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2 Jun 2008 : Column 794W—continued


Figures for 2007-08 have not been included as this information has not yet been audited.

The following table details the cost of maintaining a press office function in each RDA. The press offices sit within a larger general marketing function, therefore the relevant costs of maintaining the press office function (staff salaries plus on costs) are shown. However, it is not possible to draw a direct correlation between the cost of the press office and the number of FTE staff because in many cases RDA staff fulfil other responsibilities in addition to press office duties.

Figures for 2007-08 have not been included as this information has not yet been audited.

Cost of RDA press offices
£000
1999-2000 2000-01 2001-02 2002-03 2003-04 2004-05 2005-06 2006-07

AWM(1)

22,000

25,483

86,635

112,776

139,601

154,886

158,293

EEDA(2)

4,637

25,468

16,576

25,047

29,710

46,562

92,985

97,643

EMDA(3)

45,000

48,295

55,803

55,811

52,462

LDA(4)

118,817

137,580

213,188

287,882

207,863

NWDA(5)

37,195

87,370

107,558

128,473

186,063

171,444

194,795

ONE(6)

106,305

111,900

117,790

135,103

175,242

92,478

153,208

195,380

SEEDA(7)

13,827

43,203

57,396

L98,557

149,572

191,185

154,046

SWRDA(8)

93,159

110,662

156,970

170,797

205,537

283,839

YF(9)

51,525

53,692

71,902

88,547

100,907

110,088

(1) AWM press office costs for 1999-2000 (ie staff salary and on-costs) are archived and are available only at disproportionate cost.
(2) In 1999-2000 the EEDA press office function was only carried out for the fourth quarter of the financial year. In 2001-02 the press office function was carried out by one FTE member of staff, but was vacant during quarter two of the financial year, reflected by lower costs for that year.
(3) EMDA press office costs for 1999-2000 to 2001-02 are archived and are available only at disproportionate cost. Recent changes in the EMDA payroll system mean that it is not possible to calculate on costs such as national insurance and pension contributions for historic salary records, therefore the figures provided relate to pure salary costs only.
(4) LDA press office costs for 2000-01 and 2001-02 (ie staff salary and on-costs) are archived and are available only at disproportionate cost
(5) NWDA press office costs for 1999-2000 (ie staff salary and on-costs) are archived and are available only at disproportionate cost. In 2000-01 the press office function was not carried out for the entire final year, reflected by reduced costs for that year.
(6) At ONE North East, the press office also carries out public relations functions on behalf of the agency, which accounts for the higher than average, costs in the first four years listed.
(7) SEEDA press office costs for 1999-2000 (ie staff salary and on-costs) are archived and are available only at disproportionate cost.
(8) SWRDA press office costs for 1999-2000 and 2000-01 (ie staff salary and on-costs) are archived and are available only at disproportionate cost.
(9) YF press office costs for 1999-2000 and 2000-01 (ie staff salary and on-costs) are archived and are available only at disproportionate cost.

2 Jun 2008 : Column 795W

Public Houses

Sir Nicholas Winterton: To ask the Secretary of State for Business, Enterprise and Regulatory Reform what progress his Department has made in implementing those recommendations made by the Trade and Industry Committee on Public House Ownership in 2004 that were accepted by the Government; if he will introduce proposals for legislation to implement those recommendations in full; and if he will make a statement. [206880]

Mr. Thomas: There was just one recommendation made to Government in the House of Commons Trade and Industry Committee’s report on pub companies published on 8 December 2004.

My predecessor wrote to the Chairman of the Committee in February 2005. The Government agreed that a voluntary code could go some way to resolving concerns of tenants about their contractual relationships with pub companies. However, the Government saw difficulties with imposing a statutory code of practice upon the industry which would prescribe the terms and conditions for what are commercial arrangements.

Any competition concerns that arise in relation to the behaviour of the pub companies would be a matter for the competition authorities.

Sir Nicholas Winterton: To ask the Secretary of State for Business, Enterprise and Regulatory Reform if he will bring forward legislative proposals to regulate public house leasing to require public house owners to (a) inform their tenants how their rents are calculated, (b) prevent tenants being financially disadvantaged by the creation of a tie, (c) cease the practice of upward-only rent review and (d) remove the tie on assessment with prizes machines; and if he will make a statement. [206881]

Mr. Thomas: The arrangements under which the rent may be varied during the course of a business tenancy are a matter of agreement between the pub landlord and the lessor during negotiations and will be set out in the lease document. The lessor can only vary the rent in accordance with these agreed arrangements. Leases generally make provision for dispute resolution, which pub landlords can use to challenge the lessor’s proposals if they consider them too high.

On the question of upward only rent reviews, the Government are concerned to promote more flexibility in the commercial property market. Hence last year, at the Government’s request, the property industry introduced a stronger code of practice which makes
2 Jun 2008 : Column 796W
recommendations to landlords on rent reviews, among other things. Although the code, ‘The Code for Leasing Business Premises in England and Wales 2007’, is voluntary, Communities and Local Government will be keeping an eye on the market and have not ruled out legislation as an option. The code can be found at:

On the subject of beer ties I refer the hon. Member to my answer to written parliamentary question 2007/2709.

With regards to amusements with prizes machines, the possessor of an on-premises alcohol licence, whether the lessee of a tied premises or an owner of a free house, is automatically entitled to offer up to two category C or D gaming machines (known before the introduction of the Gambling Act 2005 as Amusement with Prizes machines), and to apply for an enhanced entitlement from the licensing authority under section 283 of the Act. The Government have no plans to review these provisions.

Public Houses: Competition

Sir Nicholas Winterton: To ask the Secretary of State for Business, Enterprise and Regulatory Reform if he will bring forward proposals for legislation to remove ties from leased public houses tied to brewers owning more than 500 pubs; if he will (a) commission an investigation into the supply tie and (b) refer the matter of the supply tie and rent formulation to the Competition Commission; and if he will make a statement. [206879]

Mr. Thomas: Ensuring that markets operate freely and fairly is a matter for the independent competition authorities, rather than for the Government. The UK competition framework has established the Office of Fair Trading (OFT) as an independent statutory body which is responsible for ensuring that markets operate competitively, and it has the powers to investigate and take action if companies are abusing a dominant position in a market or behaving anti-competitively.

Renewable Energy

Mr. Peter Ainsworth: To ask the Secretary of State for Business, Enterprise and Regulatory Reform what estimate his Department has made of the (a) amount and (b) value of renewable energy sold to customers in (i) the domestic sector, (ii) the commercial sector and (iii) the public sector in each of the last two years; and if he will make a statement. [206100]

Malcolm Wicks [holding answer 16 May 2008]: Renewable energy sources can be used to generate electricity or heat.

Thousand tonnes of oil equivalent
2005 2006

Electricity generation (renewables and wastes used to generate electricity)

4,018

4,232

Final consumption of renewables and wastes

612

603

Of which:

Domestic

256

263

Public administration

100

87

Commercial

10

10

Source:
Digest of United Kingdom Energy Statistics 2007, tables 7.1 and 7.2.

2 Jun 2008 : Column 797W

Electricity generated from renewable sources is fed into the transmission and distribution grids along with electricity from fossil fuel and nuclear sources. For this reason, the amount of electricity sourced from renewables cannot be allocated to individual consuming sectors. Therefore the value of renewable electricity sold by sector is not available. The level of renewable heat sold is small, so price information is not collected, thus no value information is available.

Mr. Peter Ainsworth: To ask the Secretary of State for Business, Enterprise and Regulatory Reform what mechanisms are in place to monitor the take-up of renewable energy by (a) domestic, (b) commercial and (c) public sector energy consumers; and if he will make a statement. [206102]

Malcolm Wicks [holding answer 16 May 2008]: Tables 7.1, 7.2 and 7.3 of the Digest of United Kingdom Energy Statistics 2007 provides final consumption data by sector for renewables and waste and also data for renewables and wastes used for electricity generation in 2006, 2005 and 2004, respectively. Corresponding tables for earlier years are also available on the BERR energy statistics website at:

The data in chapter 7 of DUKES are sourced from an ongoing study by AEA Energy and Environment on behalf of the Department for Business, Enterprise and
2 Jun 2008 : Column 798W
Regulatory Reform to update a database containing information on all relevant renewable energy sources in the United Kingdom. This database is called RESTATS—the Renewable Energy STATisticS database at:

A copy of this document is available in the Libraries of the House.

Renewable Energy: Housing

Justine Greening: To ask the Secretary of State for Business, Enterprise and Regulatory Reform what estimate he has made of the number of household grants that will be claimed under the Low Carbon Buildings Programme for (a) solar photovoltaics, (b) wind turbines, (c) small hydro, (d) solar thermal hot water, (e) ground source heat pumps, (f) biomass room heaters and stoves and (g) wood-fuelled boiler systems in (i) 2008 (ii) 2009 and (iii) 2010. [202197]

Malcolm Wicks: Given that there have been approximately 4,300 domestic installations funded through the Householder Stream of the Low Carbon Buildings Programme to date, we would estimate there to be approximately a further 8,000 domestic installations funded through the programme to scheme closure should all of the available funds be committed.

Details are shown in the following table:

Technology 2006-07 (Actual) 2007-08 (Actual) 2008-09 (Estimate) 2009-10 (Estimate) 2010-11 (Estimate) Phase 1 total (Estimate)

Biomass room heater/stove (automated wood pellet feed)

1

8

11

9

6

35

Ground source heat pump

69

181

319

261

151

981

Small scale hydro

0

2

9

5

1

17

Solar photovoltaic

228

452

357

521

447

2,005

Solar thermal hot water

1,263

1,388

1,090

1,894

1,682

7,317

Wind turbine

177

345

218

347

270

1,357

Wood fuelled boiler system

34

104

182

156

111

587

Total

1,772

2,480

2,157

3,193

2,696

12,299


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