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3 Jun 2008 : Column 860W—continued

White Fish: Conservation

Bill Wiggin: To ask the Secretary of State for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs (1) what estimate he has made of bass stocks in (a) the Tamar, (b) the Solent, (c) the Thames and (d) nationwide in each year since 1977; and if he will make a statement; [207590]

(2) if he will make a statement on the spawning stocks for bass in the UK. [207595]


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Jonathan Shaw: Bass are highly mobile and migratory fish and the exact identity of stocks is not well understood. Around the UK bass stocks are generally assessed in four units, namely the North sea, the eastern English channel, the western English channel and the UK west coast and not in terms of specific estuaries. However pre-recruit surveys (i.e. surveys of juvenile fish before they recruit to the fishery) have been carried out in the Tamar, Solent and Thames.

Bill Wiggin: To ask the Secretary of State for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs (1) when he plans to introduce measures to conserve bass stocks for anglers; and if he will make a statement; [207591]

(2) what his policy is on the designation of bass as a wholly recreational stock; and if he will make a statement. [207592]

Jonathan Shaw: There are a number of measures in place to conserve bass stocks for all those with an interest in the stock. These include a minimum landing size of 36 cm, a prohibition on the use of enmeshing nets with a mesh size of between 65 and 89 mm, and a ban on fishing from boats for bass in 37 areas around the coast of England and Wales where undersized fish are particularly vulnerable to capture, known as bass nursery areas.

Bass is a particularly important stock for the inshore fishing fleet. Given the current pressures faced by this fleet and the relatively healthy state of the stock at present, I could not justify designating bass as a wholly recreational stock. However, I have announced a package of new measures that will provide benefits for stocks of bass and more widely for anglers. This includes a review of bass nursery areas and inshore netting restrictions and for consultation on the designation and design of new areas. We are also funding research exploring the use of restricted areas to benefit recreational anglers.

Bill Wiggin: To ask the Secretary of State for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs what estimate he has made of the total bass biomass in UK waters in each year since 1997; and if he will make a statement. [207593]


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Jonathan Shaw: Bass stocks around the UK were last assessed by the International Council for the Exploration of the Sea (ICES) in 2004 and more recently by the Centre for Environment, Fisheries and Aquaculture Science (CEFAS) in 2006 and 2008. The latest assessments suggest that since 1997 the biomass of bass in UK waters has continued to increase in all areas.

Bill Wiggin: To ask the Secretary of State for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs what bass sampling his Department undertakes; and if he will make a statement. [207594]

Jonathan Shaw: The Marine and Fisheries Agency samples commercial landings of bass in accordance with the European Commission data collection regulation. Samples of scales and length information are processed by the Centre for Environment, Fisheries and Aquaculture Science (CEFAS) to provide information on population length and age structure. In recent years, CEFAS has processed around 2,000 scale samples and 4,000 length measurements per year.

CEFAS also carries out pre-recruit surveys (i.e. surveys of juvenile fish before they recruit to the fishery) in the Thames and Solent and commissions a pre-recruit survey in the Tamar. As part of a new R and D programme, CEFAS will also be investigating the utility of data from power station intake screens to provide new recruitment indices.

Home Department

Airports: Security

John Thurso: To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department pursuant to the Answer of 1 April 2008, Official Report, column 738W, on airports: security, what records are kept of passengers arrested while attempting to pass through UK airport security; how many passengers were arrested in the last 12 months; and how many of those have been (a) charged and (b) convicted of an offence. [204195]

Mr. McNulty: The information requested is not held centrally. The police use their powers at an airport in the same way as at any other location as appropriate. Information held by the Ministry of Justice on the number of arrests is based on aggregated data reported by the 43 police forces in England and Wales. Data are collected centrally by main offence group such as violence against the person, sexual offences, drugs offences, etc. It is not possible to determine from these data the circumstances or location of an arrest, such as an airport.

Alcoholic Drinks: Crime

Mr. Spring: To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department how many cautions were issued for public drinking offences in Suffolk in each of the last five years. [201497]

Mr. Coaker: The number of cautions issued in Suffolk for public drinking offences can be found in the following table. Additionally, Penalty Notices for Disorder (PNDs) were rolled out to all police forces in 2004. The data shows that in 2004, 302 persons received a PND for public drinking offences in Suffolk. In 2005 the figure was 404, and in 2006 the figure was 376.


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Number of offenders cautioned for public drinking offences in Suffolk police force area, 2002 to 2006( 1,2,3)
Cautioned

2002

268

2003

240

2004(4)

188

2005

81

2006

70

(1) These data are on the principal offence basis.
(2) Every effort is made to ensure that the figures presented are accurate and complete. However, it is important to note that these data have been extracted from large administrative data systems generated by the courts and police forces. As a consequence, care should be taken to ensure data collection processes and their inevitable limitations are taken into account when those data are used.
(3) The data above include the following offences and statutes;
Being found drunk in a highway or other Public place whether a building or not, or a licensed premises—Licensing Act 1872 sec 12.
Alcohol consumption in designated public places—Criminal Justice and Police Act 2001 sec 12.
Any person who in any public place is guilty, while drunk, of disorderly behaviour—Criminal Justice Act 1967 sec.91.
(4) The Penalty Notice for Disorder (PND) scheme was rolled out to all police forces in 2004. Three offences in the scheme relate to “public drinking”.

Ms Keeble: To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department what assessment her Department has made of the effect on crime levels of binge drinking. [206018]

Mr. Coaker: The Government take the issue of crime committed by individuals when drunk, or through binge drinking, very seriously. The Government are aware that drinking among young people under the age of 18 is associated with criminal and disorderly behaviour. Nearly half of all 10 to 17-year-olds who drink once a week or more, admitted to some sort of criminal or disorderly behaviour. Of young people aged 18 to 24, those who binge drink were far more likely to admit to committing criminal or disorderly behaviour during or after drinking.

The Government have taken a number of actions in order to combat this issue, including introducing the Tackling Violent Crime Programme (TVCP) which was launched in November 2004. Additionally, local areas are now required to address alcohol-related issues within their crime and disorder reduction partnerships (CDRP) strategies. The Government have produced guidance to assist local areas in producing their strategies, and the Government offices for the regions are co-ordinating this requirement within their specific region. The Government have also recently published “A practical guide for dealing with alcohol related problems” which is aimed at local alcohol practitioners and gives advice about the tools and powers available to tackle alcohol-related crime.

The Government are working to improve the way alcohol-related offenders are dealt with in custody and in the community. The National Offender Management Service is taking this work forward which includes; the publication of an alcohol pack for offenders under probation supervision, disseminating across the national probation service learning points from alcohol best practice projects, as well as work to develop two alcohol treatment programmes for prisons.

Additionally, the Government have funded four alcohol arrest referral pilots. These schemes aim to
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offer custody-based interventions from a trained worker in order to reduce reoffending. These pilots will be rolled out to 10 new areas, which will ensure that the under 18s will also benefit from these interventions.

Alcoholic Drinks: Misuse

Ms Keeble: To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department what records she holds on levels of binge drinking by (a) men and (b) women over the last 10 years, broken down by age groups. [206765]

Mr. Coaker: The Home Office does not routinely collect records on levels of binge drinking by age and gender although a number of ad hoc studies have been published over the past decade. These are as listed.

It is also worth noting that there is no universally agreed definition of binge drinking, but the term has generally been used to describe a pattern of drinking that involves drinking alcohol to excess over a short period of time.

Alcoholic Drinks: Young People

Mr. Graham Stuart: To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department how many people were (a) cautioned, (b) prosecuted and (c) given a penalty notice for disorder for selling alcohol to people under the age of 18 years in each constituency in Yorkshire and the Humber in each of the last five years; and if she will make a statement. [192900]

Mr. Coaker: Information held on the court proceedings and PND databases cannot be broken down by constituency area, therefore information has been provided by police force area.

The number of persons issued with a caution, penalty notice for disorder, or proceeded against at magistrates courts for the offence of selling alcohol to people under the age of 18 years in Humberside, North Yorkshire, South Yorkshire, and West Yorkshire police force areas for the years 2002 to 2006 can be viewed in tables 1 and 2 as follows.


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N umber of persons issued with a caution, or proceeded against at magistrates courts for certain alcohol offences in the Humberside, North Yorkshire, South Yorkshire and West Yorkshire police force areas for the years 2002 to 2006( 1,2,3,4)
Proceeded against Cautions( 5)
Force 2002 2003 2004 2005( 3) 2006( 3) 2002 2003 2004 2005( 3) 2006( 3)

Humberside

0

0

11

2

6

0

1

0

0

0

North Yorkshire

0

7

22

3

41

0

0

0

1

0

South Yorkshire

0

0

5

18

10

0

38

35

25

8

West Yorkshire

14

1

21

15

17

0

0

0

1

0

(1) These data are on the principal offence basis.
(2) Data include the following offence descriptions and corresponding statutes:
Holder of occasional permission or his agent knowingly selling to,
knowingly allow consumption by or allowing any person to sell,
intoxicating liquor to a person under 18. Selling etc intoxicating liquor to person under 18 for consumption on the premises.
Licensing (Occasional Permissions) Act 1983 Schedule (Sec 3) para 4(1). Licensing Act 1964 Sec 169(1).
Sale of alcohol to a person Under 18,
Licensing Act 2003 S.146(1).
Wholesaler selling intoxicating liquor to a person under 18,
Licensing Act 1964 Sec 181A(1) as added by Licensing Act 1988 Sec 17.
Allow sale of alcohol to an individual under 18,
Licensing Act 2003 Sec 147(1) and (5).
(3) The Licensing Act 2003 came into force on 24 November 2005.
(4) Every effort is made to ensure that the figures presented are accurate and complete. However, it is important to note that these data have been extracted from large administrative data systems generated by the courts, other agencies, and police forces. As a consequence, care should be taken to ensure data collection processes and their inevitable limitations are taken into account when those data are used.
(5) From 1 June 2000 the Crime and Disorder Act 1998 came into force nationally and removed the use of cautions for persons under 18 and replaced them with reprimands and final warnings.
Reprimands and final warnings are included in the above data.
Source:
Court proceedings data held by RDS—Office for Criminal Justice Reform—Ministry of Justice

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