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9 Jun 2008 : Column 54W—continued

Diabetes: Health Services

Keith Vaz: To ask the Secretary of State for Health what percentage of doctors do not design care plans for those with diabetes. [208301]

Ann Keen: The information requested is not collected centrally. However, the Healthcare Commission’s National Survey of People with Diabetes 2007 states that across all primary care trusts 34 per cent. to 61 per cent. of people with diabetes had agreed a plan to manage their condition.

To respond to this the Department, in partnership with Diabetes UK and the National Diabetes and Kidney Support Team, has set up a self management working group to support the national health service in developing and spreading all the elements of self management, including care planning.

We are clear that the process of care planning is a key way of supporting people to self-manage their condition on a day-to-day-basis, and that all people with diabetes should have the opportunity to be equal partners in their care.

Keith Vaz: To ask the Secretary of State for Health what arrangements are made by primary care trusts to provide emotional and psychological support for adults with diabetes. [208302]

Ann Keen: Decisions about the provision of emotional and psychological support for adults with diabetes are for local primary care trusts. However, we recognise the importance it has in enabling people with diabetes to self-manage their condition on a day-to-day basis. The Department of Health has therefore begun work in collaboration with Diabetes UK to identify what needs to be done to enable the NHS and local care services to meet the psychological and emotional needs of all people with diabetes to support self care.

Keith Vaz: To ask the Secretary of State for Health what mechanisms exist for those with diabetes who exhibit complications to be monitored by their local primary care trust. [208303]

Ann Keen: The “Quality and Outcomes Framework” has identified an extra 200,000 people with diabetes in the last two years, who are now able to access the support and treatment they need to manage their condition. QOF data also shows that the number of people meeting targets for blood pressure, HbA1c (blood glucose) and cholesterol is rising year on year.

The “Diabetes National Service Framework” highlights the importance of people with diabetes having annual checks. This provides the opportunity
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for the results of key test and measurements to be discussed, and for any complications to be identified as early as possible.

Keith Vaz: To ask the Secretary of State for Health when the Government's report on progress in attaining the national service framework standards for diabetes will be published. [208304]

Ann Keen: We are planning to publish our progress report on the National Diabetes Service Framework during summer 2008.

Diabetes: Screening

Sandra Gidley: To ask the Secretary of State for Health (1) what steps his Department is taking to encourage all primary care trusts to establish a programme for the early detection of diabetes; [208062]

(2) what estimate he has made of the number of primary care trusts with a programme for the early identification of diabetes; and if he will make a statement. [208063]

Ann Keen: The Prime Minister announced in January the Government’s intention to develop a programme to assess people’s risk of heart disease, stroke, diabetes and kidney disease. “Putting Prevention First Vascular Checks: risk assessment and management”, published on 1 April 2008, showed that a vascular checks programme for those aged between 40 and 74, would be clinically and cost effective. Copies of the publication are available in the Library.

There is already a considerable amount of prevention and risk management activity taking place in general practice in relation to individual vascular conditions such as chronic heart conditions and diabetes. The Vascular Checks Programme will ensure that all those between the age of 40 and 74 have the opportunity of a vascular check which will include the identification of those at risk of Type 2 diabetes and include a glucose test where appropriate. We are now working with stakeholders to design the programme for delivery from 2009-10.

Doctors: Housing

Matthew Taylor: To ask the Secretary of State for Health what proportion of junior doctors have been housed in NHS-provided accommodation in (a) Cornwall, (b) each parliamentary constituency in Cornwall, (c) the south-west and (d) England since 1979. [208325]

Ann Keen: This information is not collected centrally.

Matthew Taylor: To ask the Secretary of State for Health how much the provision of accommodation for junior doctors in (a) Cornwall, (b) each parliamentary constituency in Cornwall, (c) the south-west and (d) England has cost the NHS since 1979. [208326]

Ann Keen: This information is not collected centrally.


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Sandra Gidley: To ask the Secretary of State for Health what recent assessment he has made of the adequacy of junior doctors' accommodation; and if he will make a statement. [209197]

Ann Keen: This information is not collected centrally.

Sandra Gidley: To ask the Secretary of State for Health how many junior doctors were provided with NHS-funded accommodation by his Department in each of the last five years. [209198]

Ann Keen: This information is not collected centrally.

Epilepsy: Finance

Mr. Hancock: To ask the Secretary of State for Health what financial support his Department provided for National Epilepsy week 2008. [207861]

Ann Keen: The Department has not funded the National Epilepsy week.

Health Professions: Foreigners

Mr. Clifton-Brown: To ask the Secretary of State for Health when he expects to publish the results of the consultation on proposals for managing applications for medical careers from medical graduates from outside the European Economic Area. [208209]

Ann Keen: In July 2008.

Health Services: Children

Anne Milton: To ask the Secretary of State for Health what correlation there is between the children’s national service framework and the Children’s Plan; what plans he has to review the former; and if he will make a statement. [208228]

Ann Keen: The “National Service Framework for Children, Young People and Maternity Services” (the NSF) concentrates on the health and wellbeing of children, whereas the “Children’s Plan: Building brighter futures” is about ensuring that Britain is the best country in the world in which to be a child. There will also be a Child Health Strategy, which will not supersede the NSF but be about ensuring the implementation of the standards already set out in the NSF. Increasingly, local authorities and primary care trusts will be judged on their implementation of the NSF. Copies of both the NSF and the Children’s Plan are available in the Library.

Health Visitors

Mike Penning: To ask the Secretary of State for Health how many health visitors worked in the NHS in each year since 1997. [208458]

Ann Keen: The number of health visitors employed by the national health service in each year since 1997 is shown in the following table.


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Health visitors employed in the NHS (England) as at September each year (headcount and full-time equivalent)
Headcount Full-time equivalent

1997

12,410

10,025

1998

12,572

10,068

1999

12,800

10,161

2000

12,827

10,046

2001

13,053

10,186

2002

12,774

9,912

2003

12,984

9,999

2004

13,303

10,137

2005

12,818

9,809

2006(1)

12,034

9,376

2007

11,569

9,056

(1) More accurate validation in 2006 has resulted in 232 headcount duplicate records being identified and removed from the non-medical census.
Source:
Department of Health Non-Medical Workforce Census

Hospital Wards: Gender

Mike Penning: To ask the Secretary of State for Health how many patients have been placed on mixed sex wards at (a) Hemel Hempstead, (b) Watford and (c) St. Albans hospitals since May 2006. [208460]

Ann Keen: The information requested is not held centrally.

The Department is committed to reducing mixed sex accommodation to an absolute minimum. On those occasions where the need to treat and admit takes precedence over complete gender separation, everything possible should be done to maximise privacy and dignity.

Hospitals: Closures

Mr. Gummer: To ask the Secretary of State for Health what guidance he issues to primary care trusts on ceasing to purchase services from hospital units earmarked for possible closure before the consultation on such closure has been concluded. [209885]

Ann Keen: This is entirely a matter for primary care trusts to determine.

Human-Animal Hybrid Embryos

Mr. Burrowes: To ask the Secretary of State for Health whether specific consent was obtained from the donor or donors of the human fibroblast cells used to clone animal-human hybrid embryos at Newcastle University. [209804]

Dawn Primarolo: We understand from the Human Fertilisation and Embryology Authority (HFEA) that the university of Newcastle Upon Tyne, under licence R0179, are currently using human embryonic stem cells (derived from research project R0145) to create hybrid embryos. Research project R0145, carried out at the Centre for LIFE at Newcastle, involves deriving stem cells from poor quality embryos which are not suitable for treatment. Patients donating embryos to this research project would have given consent for their embryos to be used in stem cell research. It is a condition of the UK Stem Cell Bank Steering
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Committee that consent forms signed by donors of material to be used in the creation of stem cell lines unequivocally state that donors have no control over any future uses of stem cell lines derived from donated material.

In the future the group plan to use dermal fibroblasts (skin cells), donated by patients recruited by dermatologists at Newcastle, to create hybrids. The HFEA and Local Research Ethics Committee would need to approve the patient information and consent forms used for obtaining consent from these patients.

The Human Fertilisation and Embryology Bill contains provisions to require that explicit consent for the creation of human admixed embryos is obtained.

Incontinence: Medical Equipment

Greg Mulholland: To ask the Secretary of State for Health (1) when he expects to publish the consultation into the arrangements under Part IX of the Drug Tariff for the Provision of Stoma and Incontinence Appliances in primary care; [209794]

(2) what the reasons are for the time taken to publish the revised proposals under Part IX of the Drug Tariff, concerning arrangements for the provision of stoma and incontinence appliances in primary care. [209795]

Ann Keen: A further consultation “Proposed new arrangements on the arrangements under Part IX of the Drug Tariff for the provision of stoma and incontinence appliances—and related services—in Primary Care”, was published on 9 June 2008 and copies have been placed in the Library. The closing date for responses is 9 September 2008.

It had been intended that publication would take place at the end of May but the reclassification of the 5,000-plus items under review took longer than expected.

Lung Diseases

Mr. David Anderson: To ask the Secretary of State for Health (1) what recent representations his Department has received on the incidence of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease; [209830]

(2) what steps the Government has taken to raise awareness of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease; [209831]

(3) what assessment his Department has made of the potential for pulmonary rehabilitation and follow-on exercise classes to reduce the number of emergency hospital admissions for patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease. [209832]

Ann Keen: The Department is currently considering advice from the Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease (COPD) External Reference Group on proposed markers of good practice from prevention through to end of life care. This advice will be considered by Ministers and options developed for implementation. These will include options for early diagnosis of people with COPD and raising awareness of the disease. There is good evidence that pulmonary rehabilitation and regular exercise can drive significant improvements in the health status of people with COPD, with subsequent reduction in the number of emergency hospital admissions.


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Maternity Services

Mike Penning: To ask the Secretary of State for Health on how many (a) full and (b) part days NHS maternity units were closed to new admissions (i) because the unit had reached full capacity and (ii) for another reason in 2007; and if he will make a statement. [208424]

Ann Keen: This information is not collected centrally.

Nurses: Diabetes

Keith Vaz: To ask the Secretary of State for Health (1) how many diabetes specialist nurses there are in the NHS; [208305]

(2) what assessment he has made of research at the University Hospitals of Leicester NHS Trust on the effects on costs of employing more diabetes specialist nurses in accident and emergency centres; [208306]

(3) how many diabetes specialist nurses will be employed in the NHS in 2008-09. [208307]

Ann Keen: Information on the number of diabetes specialist nurses employed in the national health service is not collected centrally. Workforce planning is a matter for local determination as local NHS organisations are best placed to assess the health care needs of their local population.

It is vital that people with diabetes in hospital are identified and treated accordingly, and diabetes specialist nurses can play a valuable role in this. In March 2008 the National Diabetes Support Team published “Improving emergency and inpatient care for people with diabetes”, which highlights the importance of the diabetes specialist team, including specialist nurses, in reducing length of stay and improving outcomes for people with diabetes.


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