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9 Jun 2008 : Column 102W—continued



9 Jun 2008 : Column 103W

9 Jun 2008 : Column 104W
Table 10.2: Average time served in prison by prisoners discharged from determinate sentences on completion of sentence or on licence, young offenders, England and Wales 2006
Months
Average time served Percentage of sentence served
Length of sentence( 1) Number of persons discharged( 2, 3) Average length of sentence Including remand time Excluding remand time Including remand time Excluding remand time

Male and female young offenders

All lengths of sentence less than indeterminate

12,500

9.8

4.9

4.2

51

43

Up to and including 3 months

2,800

1.9

1.0

0.9

55

49

Over 3 months up to and including 6 months

4,700

4.8

2.5

2.1

52

45

Over 6 months less than 12 months

1,900

8.6

4.2

3.5

49

41

12 months

700

12.0

6.1

5.3

50

44

Over 12 months up to and including 18 months

700

17.0

8.3

7.2

49

43

Over 18 months up to and including 3 years

1,000

28.4

13.6

11.7

48

41

Over 3 years less than 4 years

300

42.4

20.5

17.5

48

41

4 years

100

48.0

28.0

24.8

58

52

Over 4 years less than indeterminate

100

59.7

34.4

31.0

58

52

Male young offenders

All lengths of sentence less than indeterminate

11,700

9.9

5.0

4.3

51

43

Up to and including 3 months

2,600

1.9

1.0

0.9

55

49

Over 3 months up to and including 6 months

4,400

4.8

2.5

2.1

52

45

Over 6 months less than 12 months

1,800

8.6

4.2

3.6

49

41

12 months

700

12.0

6.1

5.3

51

44

Over 12 months up to and including 18 months

700

17.0

8.4

7.3

49

43

Over 18 months up to and including 3 years

1,000

28.5

13.7

11.7

48

41

Over 3 years less than 4 years

300

42.4

20.5

17.5

48

41

4 years

100

48.0

28.2

25.1

59

52

Over 4 years less than indeterminate

100

59.6

34.4

31.0

58

52

Female young offenders

All lengths of sentence less than indeterminate

800

8.0

3.8

3.2

47

40

Up to and including 3 months

300

2.0

1.0

0.9

50

45

Over 3 months up to and including 6 months

300

4.8

2.4

2.1

50

43

Over 6 months less than 12 months

100

8.5

3.7

3.2

43

38

12 months

30

12.0

6.0

5.2

50

43

Over 12 months up to and including 18 months

20

16.9

7.2

6.2

42

37

Over 18 months less than indeterminate

70

33.6

15.7

13.5

47

40

(1) On discharge: the sentence may change after reception if there are further charges or an appeal.
(2) Excludes discharges following recall after release on licence, non-criminals, persons committed to custody for non-payment of a fine and persons reclassified as adult prisoners.
(3 )Rounded to the nearest 100 or to the nearest 10 for numbers less than 100.
Data Sources and Quality:
These figures have been drawn from administrative IT systems. Care is taken when processing and analysing the returns, but the detail collected is subject to the inaccuracies inherent in any large-scale recording system. See Technical appendix of report for fuller information.

Prisoners Release

Mr. Garnier: To ask the Secretary of State for Justice how many prisoners released on licence did not complete a risk of harm screening and a risk management plan prior to release in each of the last 10 years for which figures are available. [208046]

Mr. Hanson: Risk of harm screening and risk management plans were introduced as part of the Offender Assessment System (OASys). The roll-out of OASys began in 2003 and is being delivered to offenders serving custodial sentences of more than 12 months. Data on the number of prisoners released on licence without a risk of harm screening and/or a risk management plan is not collated centrally. To provide this information would require manual cross checking of separate databases, which could be carried out only at disproportionate cost.

Prisoners: Electronic Tagging

David T.C. Davies: To ask the Secretary of State for Justice if he will bring forward plans to upgrade or replace the existing system for tracking prisoners who have been released with a tag. [209035]

Mr. Hanson: Electronic monitoring (EM) has been operating throughout England and Wales since 1999, following earlier pilot schemes. It is available at all stages of the criminal justice system. Adults or juveniles can be monitored on bail, as a court-ordered community sentence or release from prison. There are no plans to upgrade or replace the existing system, but we keep all processes and technology under review.

Prisoners: Ex-servicemen

Dr. Murrison: To ask the Secretary of State for Justice what estimate he has made of the proportion of the prison population who are veterans of the armed forces. [209076]

Mr. Hanson: I refer the hon. Member to my answer to the hon. Member for Eastleigh (Chris Huhne) on 13 May 2008, Official Report, column. 1512W.

Data from nationally representative surveys of some 2,000 sentenced prisoners near release in all prisons in England and Wales conducted in 2001, 2003 and 2004 show the proportion of prisoners who had previously served in the armed forces as 6 per cent., 4 per cent. and 5 per cent. respectively.

Information relating to prisoners in Scotland and in Northern Ireland is a matter for Scottish Executive and the Northern Ireland Prison Service respectively.

Prisons: Electronic Surveillance

Andrew Mackinlay: To ask the Secretary of State for Justice pursuant to the answer of 2 June 2008, Official Report, columns 849-50W, on prisons: electronic surveillance, what regime of authorisation and oversight of personal covert surveillance operations in prisons was in force in 1999; and if he will make a statement. [209485]

Mr. Straw: Prior to the introduction of the Regulation of Investigatory Powers Act, 2000, there was no legislation regarding covert surveillance in prisons nor was there independent scrutiny of any such operations. Covert surveillance operations in 1999 required authority of the Home Secretary.


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