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23 Jun 2008 : Column 83W—continued

Economic and Monetary Union

Mr. Maude: To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department on what date the euro changeover plan of (a) her Department and (b) each of its agencies was last updated; and if she will place in the Library a copy of the most recent version of each plan. [210843]

Mr. Byrne: The Home Office produced its euro changeover plan in December 2002; related arrangements for its agencies were included in the Home Office Plans.

A copy of the plan has been placed in the Library.

Essex Police: Bureaucracy

Mr. Burns: To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department what estimate she has made of the average amount of time each week that police officers in Essex Police spent (a) on patrol and (b) dealing with paperwork in the last 12 months. [211239]

Mr. McNulty [holding answer 17 June 2008]: The latest available data are for 2006-07 and are set out in the following table.


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Essex police—time spent on patrol and paperwork
2006-07 Percentage

Time Spent on Patrol

11.80

Time Spent on all Paperwork

24.70

Time Spent on Incident Related Paperwork(1)

11.60

(1) Also included in time spent on paperwork.

Time on patrol on its own does not provide an accurate picture of frontline police activity. In 2006-07 Essex police officers spent 64.8 per cent. of their time on frontline duties. The measurement of time on patrol only refers to the time when an officer is patrolling but engaged in no other duty. Any activity that an officer responds to while on patrol (such as street crime or a burglary) is recorded separately against the other activity and not shown as patrol. In the last three years the Essex police has returned 1,000 police officers to frontline duties from back office functions.

We are committed to reducing the time spent on paperwork by police officers, as is Essex police. The force has made a pledge to attend the scene of every crime and take a full witness statement from all victims, dependent on their individual needs which may contribute to the extra time spent on paperwork.

I am told by Essex police that comparing 2007-08 with the previous year shows 8,000 fewer victims of crime in the county, 1,000 more crimes detected, 13,500 fewer incidents of antisocial behaviour, and an additional 3,500 persons arrested. This is welcome and shows that the force is making Essex a safer place in which to live.

My right hon. Friend the Home Secretary has already accepted Sir Ronnie Flanagan’s recommendation to remove lengthy Stop and Account forms, and will also consider more proportionate and streamlined stop and search and crime recording forms. We are continuing with consultation on reforms of the Police and Criminal Evidence Act 1984, streamlining the Criminal Justice process, and investing £50 million in new mobile data technology.

Helicopters: Tewkesbury

Mr. Laurence Robertson: To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department whether a police helicopter was flying at grid reference GR 214 384, over land at Fiddington, adjacent to Clayton Lane, near Tewkesbury, on 4 December 2007 between 4.15 p.m. and 4.45 p.m. [211234]

Mr. McNulty [holding answer 16 June 2008]: This would normally be a matter for the police, or police forces concerned. I have, however, been informed on this occasion that there were no police helicopters flying at grid reference GR 214 384, over land at Fiddington, adjacent to Clayton Lane, near Tewkesbury, on 4 December 2007 between 4.15 p.m. and 4.45 p.m.

Immigration: Detention Centres

Damian Green: To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department what the maximum number of persons is that can be held on the immigration detention estate. [212345]


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Mr. Byrne: The immigration detention estate is comprised of dedicated male, female and family accommodation, giving a normal total capacity of 2,550 places.

An ongoing refurbishment and repair programme has temporarily reduced the current capacity to 2,477 places.

Internet: Advertising

Daniel Kawczynski: To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department (1) if she will review the guidance note her Department has issued on the compatibility of targeted online advertising with existing legislation, with particular reference to the online marketing tool, Phorm; [210914]

(2) what reports she has received on the compatibility of the internet marketing tool Phorm with existing legislation; and if she will make a statement; [210915]

(3) what investigations have been carried out by (a) her Department and (b) police forces into the use of the internet marketing tool Phorm. [210916]

Mr. McNulty: In response to requests from some companies in the communications industry for a Home Office view on targeted online advertising and the applicability of the Regulation of Investigatory Powers Act 2000 (RIPA), a note was issued in February this year. The note was produced without reference to any particular technology or application. It was not intended for publication, but was disseminated by one of the companies. It can be found at:

The note expressed a generalised view on whether RIPA was relevant to targeted online advertising. However, it was not formal guidance nor was it a definitive statement of the law. The Home Office has subsequently received a number of representations and reports from interested parties who have expressed their view on this matter. Those representations have not changed the Home Office view, as set out in the note.

The Home Office has not undertaken any investigations into any targeted online advertising services. Investigations of this nature would be a matter for the police, although we are not aware of any such investigations.

Jean Charles de Menezes

Mr. Amess: To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department what discussions (a) she, (b) Ministers in her Department, (c) her special advisers and (d) officials in her Department had with the Commissioner of the Police for the Metropolis about Jean Charles de Menezes in each week since January 2006; what the (i) location and (ii) duration of each meeting was; whether a record of each meeting was kept; who attended each meeting; what the cost was of each meeting, broken down by (A) administrative and (B) other costs; and if she will make a statement. [192488]


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Mr. McNulty [holding answer 18 March 2008]: Regular discussions take place between the Commissioner of Police for the Metropolis and Ministers and senior Home Office officials on matters of mutual interest. During the period in question these will have included on occasion the tragic case of Mr. de Menezes.

Lincolnshire Police Authority

Mr. Hogg: To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department when she plans to make a statement on the precept levied by the Lincolnshire Police Authority. [211587]

Mr. McNulty: The Lincolnshire police authority have submitted written representations as to why their budget increase was not excessive and have also made oral representations at a joint meeting with my hon. Friend, the Minister for Local Government, and me.

We are currently considering those representations and will make an announcement as soon as possible.

Metropolitan Police: Public Relations

Mr. Greg Knight: To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department what information her Department has on the amount spent by the Metropolitan Police on public relations in each of the last four years. [209325]

Mr. McNulty [holding answer 10 June 2008]: This is an operational matter for the Metropolitan Police Service.

MI5: Political Impartiality

Dr. Julian Lewis: To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department pursuant to the oral answer of 9 June 2008, Official Report, column 16, what criteria govern the range of subjects on which it is appropriate for the Security Service to express a professional view without contravention of its political neutrality. [210476]

Mr. McNulty [holding answer 16 June 2008]: The Security Service is the UK's security intelligence agency. It works to protect the UK against covertly organised threats by obtaining, collating, analysing and assessing secret intelligence relating to threats to national security.

Section 1 of the Security Service Act 1989 establishes the functions of the Security Service as:

It is on these functions that it is appropriate for the Service to advise the Government, normally in private. This in no way conflicts with the duty placed on the Director General, by section 2(2)(b),


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This requirement for political neutrality is reflected in the Home Secretary's reply of 9 June. There might from time to time be circumstances in which a statement is made for public information. It is for the Director General to decide when and in what circumstances to issue such a statement in consultation with the Secretary of State, other agencies or Departments, or the police, as appropriate.

Missing Persons: Cheshire

Helen Southworth: To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department how many reports of missing people were made to Cheshire constabulary in 2007, broken down by local authority area; how many of them related to (a) vulnerable adults, (b) children under the age of 12, (c) children aged 12 to 16 and (d) young people aged 17 to 18 years; and how many of the reports of a missing person under the age of 18 years related to a child or young person (i) in the care of a local authority, (ii) with a learning disability and (iii) with a physical disability. [207239]

Mr. McNulty: This is a matter for Cheshire constabulary. Statistics on the number and age of individuals who are reported missing from home are not currently collected centrally.

One of the priorities for the Missing Persons Bureau is the development of a national picture of missing persons, including the relevant statistical information. The National Policing Improvement Agency is working with key stakeholders, including Missing People and the Missing Persons Strategic Oversight Group, to take this work forward.

Missing Persons: Cumbria

Mr. Martlew: To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department how many reports of missing people were made to Cumbria constabulary in 2007, broken down by local authority area of origin; how many of them related to (a) vulnerable adults, (b) children under the age of 12 years, (c) children aged 12 to 16 years and (d) young people aged 17 to 18 years; and how many of the reports of a missing person under the age of 18 years related to a child or young person (i) in the care of a local authority, (ii) with a learning disability and (iii) with a physical disability. [207306]

Mr. McNulty: This is a matter for Cumbria constabulary. Statistics on the number and age of individuals who are reported missing from home are not currently collected centrally.

One of the priorities for the Missing Persons Bureau is the development of a national picture of missing persons, including the relevant statistical information. The National Policing Improvement Agency is working with key stakeholders, including Missing People and the Missing Persons Strategic Oversight Group, to take this work forward.

Missing Persons: Derbyshire

Judy Mallaber: To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department how many reports of missing people were made to Derbyshire constabulary in 2007, broken down by local authority area; how many of them related
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to (a) vulnerable adults, (b) children under the age of 12, (c) children aged between 12 and 16 and (d) young people aged 17 to 18 years; and how many of the reports of a missing person under the age of 18 years related to a child or young person (i) in the care of a local authority, (ii) with a learning disability and (iii) with a physical disability. [207773]

Mr. McNulty: This is a matter for Derbyshire constabulary. Statistics on the number and age of individuals who are reported missing from home are not currently collected centrally.

One of the priorities for the Missing Persons Bureau is the development of a national picture of missing persons, including the relevant statistical information. The National Policing Improvement Agency is working with key stakeholders, including Missing People and the Missing Persons Strategic Oversight Group, to take this work forward.

Missing Persons: Devon

Linda Gilroy: To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department how many reports of missing people were made to Devon and Cornwall constabulary in 2007, broken down by local authority area of origin; how many of them related to (a) vulnerable adults, (b) children under the age of 12 years, (c) children aged 12 to 16 years and (d) young people aged 17 to 18 years; and how many of the reports of a missing person under the age of 18 years related to a child or young person (i) in the care of a local authority, (ii) with a learning disability and (iii) with a physical disability. [207304]

Mr. McNulty: This is a matter for Devon and Cornwall constabulary. Statistics on the number and age of individuals who are reported missing from home are not currently collected centrally.

One of the priorities for the Missing Persons Bureau is the development of a national picture of missing persons, including the relevant statistical information. The National Policing Improvement Agency is working with key stakeholders, including Missing People and the Missing Persons Strategic Oversight Group, to take this work forward.

Missing Persons: Durham

Hilary Armstrong: To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department how many reports of missing people were made to Durham constabulary in 2007, broken down by local authority area; how many of them related to (a) vulnerable adults, (b) children under the age of 12, (c) children aged between 12 and 16 and (d) young people aged 17 to 18 years; and how many of the reports of a missing person under the age of 18 years related to a child or young person (i) in the care of a local authority, (ii) with a learning disability and (iii) with a physical disability. [207772]

Mr. McNulty: This is a matter for Durham constabulary. Statistics on the number and age of individuals who are reported missing from home are not currently collected centrally.

One of the priorities for the Missing Persons Bureau is the development of a national picture of missing persons, including the relevant statistical information.
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The National Policing Improvement Agency is working with key stakeholders, including Missing People and the Missing Persons Strategic Oversight Group, to take this work forward.

Missing Persons: Gloucestershire

Mr. Drew: To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department how many reports of missing people were made to Gloucestershire constabulary in 2007, broken down by local authority area; how many of them related to (a) vulnerable adults, (b) children under the age of 12, (c) children aged 12 to 16 and (d) young people aged 17 to 18 years; and how many of the reports of a missing person under the age of 18 years related to a child or young person (i) in the care of a local authority, (ii) with a learning disability and (iii) with a physical disability. [207798]

Mr. McNulty: This is a matter for Gloucestershire constabulary. Statistics on the number and age of individuals who are reported missing from home are not currently collected centrally.

One of the priorities for the Missing Persons Bureau is the development of a national picture of missing persons, including the relevant statistical information. The National Policing Improvement Agency is working with key stakeholders, including Missing People and the Missing Persons Strategic Oversight Group, to take this work forward.


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