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7 July 2008 : Column 1234W—continued

State Retirement Pensions

Jenny Willott: To ask the Secretary of State for Work and Pensions (1) what estimate he has made of the gross annual cost of increasing the basic state pension to £124.05; and if he will make a statement; [215019]

(2) what estimate he has made of the annual cost of increasing the basic state pension to £124.05, net of reductions in income-related benefits and additional tax revenue; and if he will make a statement. [215020]

Mr. Mike O'Brien: The estimated gross annual additional cost of increasing the full rate of basic state pension to £124.05 per week is around £18 billion in 2008-09.


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The estimated net annual additional cost of increasing the full rate of basic state pension to £124.05 per week, net of both reductions in income related benefits and additional tax revenue, is around £13 billion in 2008-09.

Unemployment: Greater London

Ms Buck: To ask the Secretary of State for Work and Pensions what assessment he has made of the effectiveness of measures to reduce (a) child poverty and (b) worklessness in Regent’s Park and Kensington North constituency. [214355]

Mr. Timms: Work is the best route out of poverty. For example, children in working households are much less likely to be in poverty than those living in households where no one is working. The Government have made considerable progress in tackling worklessness through national back to work programmes such as new deal as well as local initiatives like the London Childcare Affordability Pilots.

Since 1997 claimant unemployment in the Regent’s Park and Kensington North constituency has fallen by 55 per cent. and the number of lone parents claiming benefit has fallen by 13 per cent. The new deal has helped into work over 5,000 people in the constituency, 1,000 of whom have been helped by the new deal for lone parents. The proportion of children living in families dependent on out of work benefits has fallen by 2.4
7 July 2008 : Column 1236W
percentage points from 45.4 per cent. in 2004 to 43 per cent. in 2007. Information on levels of poverty are not available below Government office regional level.

Winter Fuel Payments

John Battle: To ask the Secretary of State for Work and Pensions pursuant to the answer of 12 June 2008, Official Report, column 431W, on winter fuel payments, whether the extra money referred to will be exclusively for vulnerable groups. [215489]

Mr. Mike O'Brien: In winter 2008-09 most persons aged 60 or over in the qualifying week (15-21 September 2008) and ordinarily resident in Great Britain will be eligible for the additional payment to help with rising fuel bills. Persons aged 60-79 will receive up to £50 and persons aged 80 or over up to £100. Payments will be made alongside the 2008-09 winter fuel payment.

Home Department

Assaults on Police

Mr. Evans: To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department how many assaults on police officers on duty in (a) Lancashire and (b) England there were in each year since 2000. [210908]

Mr. McNulty [holding answer 13 June 2008]: The requested data are collected on behalf of Her Majesty's Inspectorate of Constabulary and were published each year in their annual report up to 2004-05.

The available data are given in the following table.

There are plans to publish latest figures in the near future.

Assaults( 1) on police officers 1999-2000 to 2004-05( 2,3)
Force 1999-2000 2000-01 2001-02 2002-03 2003-04 2004-05

Lancashire

294

318

296

331

462

521

England

11,807

(4)11,073

11,237

12,462

(5)11,569

12,796

(1) Data collated on behalf of and published by HMIC. Serious assaults are those for which the charge would be under Sections 18 and 20 of the Offences Against the Person Act 1861. Other assaults include those with minor or no injury. Recording practices may vary over time and between forces.
(2) Financial year runs 1 April to 31 March inclusive.
(3) HMIC have advised that assaults data will no longer be published in their annual report and that the data for 2004-05 is the last series of these data to be published there.
(4) Metropolitan Police was unable to provide data in 2000-01.
(5) Greater Manchester was unable to provide data in 2003-04.

Asylum

Jenny Willott: To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department what procedures are in place to inform applicants or their legal representatives when their case is being considered by the Case Resolution Directorate, if questionnaires have not been sent to the applicant; and if she will make a statement. [199957]

Mr. Byrne: I refer the hon. Member to the answer given on 11 June 2008, Official Report, column 332W.

Harry Cohen: To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department how many unresolved asylum applications are not being considered under the New Asylum Model; and by what date she plans to resolve unresolved asylum applications not being considered under the New Asylum Model. [214769]

Mr. Byrne: We have previously estimated that there are around 400,000 to 450,000 electronic and paper records of unresolved asylum applications that are not being considered under the New Asylum Model, although this is difficult to assess accurately as many case records are dependants, duplicates or errors. This figure does not therefore equate to numbers of asylum applicants. At the end of November 2007, our total conclusions stand at around 52,000 cases. We have made good progress and remain committed and on track to conclude these cases by summer 2011. Lin Homer will shortly update the Home Affairs Select Committee on performance over the last six months.


7 July 2008 : Column 1237W

Harry Cohen: To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department how many dependants are included on asylum applications that are to date unresolved and not being considered under the New Asylum Model; and of these how many are under 18 years of age. [214770]

Mr. Byrne: To analyse the whole pool for this information would incur disproportionate costs. Further, it would be difficult to provide an accurate estimate given the errors present in the database. Of the 52,000 cases that were concluded by November 2007, around 10,000 were dependants, although this gives no indication of the number of dependants in the remaining caseload.

Harry Cohen: To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department how many (a) £5 cash support payments for children under 12 months, (b) £3 cash support payments for children aged one to three years and (c) £3 cash support payments for women who are pregnant are paid under support arrangements for those with unresolved asylum applications. [214771]

Mr. Byrne: The latest available information indicates that in the week commencing 23 June 2008 the numbers of extra cash support payments ordered for persons in receipt of support under section 95 of the Immigration and Asylum Act 1999 were: 1,230 payments for children aged under 12 months, 2,498 payments for children aged one to three years and 74 cash support payments for pregnant women. It is estimated that about 5 per cent. of payments ordered in any one week are not collected.

This is based on management information which is not a national statistic and is subject to change.

Harry Cohen: To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department how many cash support payments are paid to (a) single people aged between 16 and 18 years and (b) single people under 16 years of age under support arrangements for those with unresolved asylum applications. [214772]

Mr. Byrne: The latest available information indicates that in the week commencing 23 June 2008 there were 709 persons aged 16 or 17 years and 10,784 persons aged under 16 in receipt of support under section 95 of the Immigration and Asylum Act 1999 for whom cash payments were ordered. It is estimated that about 5 per cent. of payments ordered in any one week are not collected.

This is based on management information which is not a national statistic and is subject to change. It does not cover unaccompanied asylum seeking children who are supported by local authorities.

Dr. Kumar: To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department what mechanisms her Department has in place to monitor the treatment of failed asylum seekers after they return to their home country. [215087]

Mr. Byrne: The UK Border Agency does not proactively monitor the treatment of individual failed asylum seekers who return to their home country unless there are exceptional circumstances that warrant doing so. Rather, we do not return those who are at risk.


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Mr. Clappison: To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department pursuant to the answer of 13 June 2008, Official Report, columns 336-7W, on asylum, how many dependants of asylum seekers received indefinite leave to remain as a result of the October 2003 exercise. [215245]

Mr. Byrne: Information on the dependants of asylum claimants who were granted leave to remain under the 2003 family indefinite leave to remain exercise is not available and could be obtained only by examination of individual case records at disproportionate cost.

Information on principal asylum claimants who were granted leave to remain under the 2003 family indefinite leave to remain exercise is available from Table 12.1 in the annual Statistical Bulletin Asylum Statistics United Kingdom. Copies of these publications are available from the Library of the House and from the Home Office Research, Development and Statistics website at:

Asylum: Somalia

Jeremy Corbyn: To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department how many persons from Somalia (a) arrived in the UK, (b) sought asylum, (c) were granted refugee status and (d) were deported to Somalia in each of the last five years. [214618]

Mr. Byrne [holding answer 2 July 2008]: The latest available information requested is shown in the following tables. Initial decisions do not necessarily relate to applications made in the same period. Removals do not necessarily relate to refused applications decided in the same period. Destination data for persons removed from the UK have only been collated since 2004, so this information is not available for earlier years. Removal figures only relate to those removed to Somalia and not to other destinations. Leave to enter the UK data are not yet available for 2007.

Information on immigration control is published annually and asylum information is published annually and quarterly. Copies of these publications are available from the Library of the House and from the Home Office Research, Development and Statistics Directorate website at:

Total Somalia nationals given leave to enter the United Kingdom, 2002 to 2006( 1)

Number of journeys

2002

10,200

2003

7,460

2004

5,330

2005

5,610

2006

3,540

( 1) Provisional figures. Rounded to three significant figures.

Asylum applications( 1) received in the United Kingdom, excluding dependants, and initial decisions( 2) on applications, 2003 to 2007, nationals of Somalia . Principal applicants
Applications

Total Port In country

2003

5,090

660

4,430

2004

2,585

305

2,280

2005

1,760

250

1,510

2006(3)

1,845

245

1,600

2007(3)

1,620

265

1,350


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7 July 2008 : Column 1240W

Decisions

Total decisions Grants of asylum Grants of ELR( 4) Grants of HP( 4) Grants of DL( 4) Total refusals Certified refusals Other refusals 3rd ctry refusals( 5) Non-compliance refusals( 6)

2003

6,050

1,665

160

5

390

3,835

140

3,140

90

465

2004

3,275

455

n/a

10

455

2,355

(7)

1,930

235

190

2005

1,850

660

n/a

5

190

1,000

0

830

100

70

2006(3)

1,725

655

n/a

5

160

905

(7)

695

160

50

2007(3)

1,615

795

n/a

5

105

710

5

595

80

35

(1 )Figures rounded to nearest 5.
(2 )Information is of initial decisions, excluding the outcome of appeals or other subsequent decisions.
(3 )Provisional figures.
(4 )Humanitarian protection and discretionary leave replaced exceptional leave to remain from 1 April 2003.
(5 )Refused on the grounds that the applicant had arrived from a safe third country.
(6 )Paragraph 340 of Immigration Rules. For failure to provide evidence to support the asylum claim within a reasonable period, including failure to respond to invitation to interview.
(7 )1 or 2.
Note:
n/a = not applicable.
Source:
Immigration Research and Statistics

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