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21 July 2008 : Column 885W—continued

Lorries: Accidents

Paul Flynn: To ask the Secretary of State for Transport how many and what percentage of reported motorway traffic incidents involved a heavy goods vehicle with left-hand drive in (a) 2005, (b) 2006 and (c) 2007; and what percentage of those incidents were attributed to poor visibility or blind spots on such vehicles. [220553]

Jim Fitzpatrick: The number and percentage of reported personal injury motorway traffic accidents involving a left-hand drive heavy goods vehicle and the percentage of these accidents where the heavy goods vehicle had ‘vehicle blind spot’ as a contributory factor are shown in the table.

2005 2006 2007

Number of motorway injury accidents involving at least one left-hand drive heavy goods vehicle (HGV)

593

513

470

Percentage of all motorway injury accidents involving at least one left-hand drive HGV

7

6

6

Percentage of motorway injury accidents involving at least one left-hand drive HGV where the HGV had ‘vehicle blind spot’ as a contributory factor

40

40

36


Motor Vehicles: Accidents

John Battle: To ask the Secretary of State for Transport how many reported deaths there were in (a) Leeds West constituency, (b) Leeds Metropolitan District and (c) Yorkshire and Humberside as a result of traffic accidents in each of the last five years. [220714]

Jim Fitzpatrick: The numbers of fatalities resulting from personal injury road accidents in (a) Leeds West constituency, (b) Leeds city council and (c) Government office region of Yorkshire and Humberside, for the last five years are given in the table:

Number of fatalities

Leeds West Constituency( 1) Leeds city council Government office of Yorkshire and the Humber

2003

3

45

318

2004

5

45

311

2005

1

27

302

2006

1

40

304

2007

3

34

281

(1) Based on 2004 parliamentary boundaries

21 July 2008 : Column 886W

Motor Vehicles: Fuels

Mr. Drew: To ask the Secretary of State for Transport what legislative changes are required to extend the target dates for the renewables transport fuel obligation. [220061]

Jim Fitzpatrick: The Government has stated that it intends to consult formally on slowing down the rate of increase in the renewable transport fuel obligation (RTFO), taking the level to 5 per cent. (by volume) by 2013-14, in line with the Gallagher review's recommendation.

Subject to the outcome of this consultation, any changes to the level of the RTFO would need to be made through an amendment to the RTFO Order 2007 (SI no 3072). The draft amending order would be subject to the affirmative resolution procedure, and would therefore require a debate on its content in both Houses of Parliament.

Motorways

Mr. Lancaster: To ask the Secretary of State for Transport what assessment she has made of the effects on (a) safety and (b) access to incidents for emergency services of the opening of hard shoulders on motorways to general use. [220754]

Mr. Tom Harris: A detailed safety assessment, including the impact on access to incidents for emergency vehicles, was completed prior to the implementation of the M42 Active Traffic Management Pilot.

All aspects of the use of the hard shoulder as a running lane have been monitored on the M42 Active Traffic Management Pilot for the last 12 months. These early results indicate a significant improvement in safety and a reduction in incidents.

Bob Spink: To ask the Secretary of State for Transport what assessment she has made of the risks to the operation of hard shoulder running on motorways arising from power failures to (a) CCTV cameras and (b) control rooms. [220837]

Mr. Tom Harris: The hazard analysis and risk assessment for the M42 active traffic management pilot scheme included an assessment of the impact of power supply failures to equipment at the roadside (including closed circuit television) and at the Regional Control Centre. The impact of power supply failure on active traffic management was assessed by the Highways Agency who concluded that there was no case for additional emergency supplies for the operation of the signs and signals.

The Regional Control Centre is provided with emergency power supplies to allow continued operation in the event of a power failure. Any section of the motorway with hard shoulder running operates in fail safe mode which means that a power failure does not introduce any additional hazard.

Motorways: Accidents

Stephen Hesford: To ask the Secretary of State for Transport how many accidents have occurred on motorways since 2005. [219919]


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Mr. Tom Harris: There has been a total of 22,240 road traffic accidents on motorways in the three year period 2005 to 2007 that have resulted in personal injury. The statistics include all motorways that are the responsibility of the Highways Agency. The latest figures available are for 2007.

Railway Network: Bicycles

Mr. Wallace: To ask the Secretary of State for Transport what guidance her Department issues to train operating companies on the carriage of bicycles on trains. [220649]

Mr. Tom Harris: The Department's cycling policy document and the rail White Paper published last year set out our policy. We want all TOCs to take into account the wider benefits of cycling when considering both investments in cycle facilities and their own rules for carrying cycles.

The White Paper also announced the setting up of a task force to look into how bike and rail journeys can be better integrated. The task force includes ATOC, Network Rail, Passenger Focus, Cycling England and Transport for London. I look forward to hearing about their progress later this year.

Railways

Stephen Hammond: To ask the Secretary of State for Transport (1) with reference to the answer to the hon. Member for Epsom and Ewell (Chris Grayling) of 29 March 2007, Official Report, column 1694W, on railways, if she will place in the Library copies of the equivalent data for 2007-08; [219414]

(2) pursuant to the answer of 19 June 2008, Official Report, column 1068W, on railways: rolling stock, for what reason and on what date her Department ceased to hold and collate this information. [219434]

Mr. Tom Harris: I refer the hon. Member to my answer of 19 June. This information has never been routinely collected in the Department.

Railways: Electrification

Stephen Hammond: To ask the Secretary of State for Transport pursuant to the Answer of 19 June 2008, Official Report, column 1066W, on railways: electrification, how many staff were engaged in this work in each month of the last two years. [217527]

Mr. Tom Harris: The Department for Transport does not hold information in the form requested. A number of officials within the Department are currently supporting the industry’s work on electrification, in particular by providing technical and economic advice. This is to meet the Secretary of State’s aim of developing a prioritised list of potential routes for electrification by the end of the year.

Railways: Finance

Mrs. Villiers: To ask the Secretary of State for Transport what estimate she has made of the effect of currency fluctuations on the cost of the Intercity Express programme. [212296]


21 July 2008 : Column 888W

Mr. Tom Harris: The effects of currency fluctuations on the Intercity Express programme costs were considered in the business case and will be taken into account during the assessment of bids.

Norman Baker: To ask the Secretary of State for Transport pursuant to the answer of 19 June 2008, Official Report, columns 1066-7W, on railways: finance, how much of the financial allocation for rail (a) has been allocated in 2008-09 and (b) was allocated in 2007-08 to (i) each train operating company and (ii) Network Rail. [219802]

Mr. Tom Harris [holding answer 17 July 2008]: Funding for the railways is made up of a combination of direct Government grants to Network Rail, subsidy and premium payments to and from train operating companies (TOCs), along with income from the farebox. The bulk of Network Rail's income, as determined by the Office of Rail Regulation, is in turn made up of those Government grants and track access charges levied on the train operating companies (TOCs). A proportion of the income from subsidy and farebox revenue will go towards paying track access charges to Network Rail.

In view of this it is not possible to allocate Government funding for the railway to individual railway beneficiaries. That said, payments and premiums to and from individual TOCs and grant payments to Network Rail for 2007-8 will be published shortly by the Office of Rail Regulation in National Rail Trends. In addition, a table showing contracted payments and premiums to and from all TOCs who have extant contracts with the Government is available in the Library of the House.

Railways: Overcrowding

Stephen Hammond: To ask the Secretary of State for Transport pursuant to the answers of 19 June 2008, Official Report, column 1067W, on railways: overcrowding, when her Department's formula to determine train capacity, derived from dividing the interior size of a passenger vehicle by 0.45 square metres, was first used; and whether the divisor in the formula has ever varied from 0.45 square metres. [214781]

Mr. Tom Harris [holding answer 1 July 2008]: The standard of 0.45 square metres for determining train capacity was first used by the Office for Passenger Rail Franchising in 2000, and continues to apply today.

There are two specific variations: Class 376 trains, operating on Southeastern services; and for services operated by Stagecoach South West Trains to and from London Waterloo.

New (Class 376) purpose-built vehicles ordered for Southeastern are configured to serve short-distance Metro passenger flows, and the stock has been specifically configured with low density seating and appropriate grab rails for standing passengers, to ensure that passengers can stand in relative comfort for short-distance journeys; the same is true for Class 455 units operated by Stagecoach South West Trains, on services that stop within 20 minutes of leaving London Waterloo. In these cases the standard is varied to 0.35 and 0.25 square metres respectively.


21 July 2008 : Column 889W

Railways: Standards

Stephen Hammond: To ask the Secretary of State for Transport pursuant to the answer of 12 June 2008, Official Report, column 405W, to the hon. Member for Chipping Barnet (Mrs. Villiers) on railways: standards, for what reason and upon what date her Department ceased to gather data on the causes of train cancellation. [219442]

Mr. Tom Harris: Operational data on rail performance, including the reasons for each cancellation, is compiled by Network Rail and agreed with other rail industry parties.

The Department for Transport receives higher level information on rail performance, but does not monitor the operation of every train. This has been the case since the start of rail franchising in 1996.

Road Safety Act 2006

Mr. David Jones: To ask the Secretary of State for Transport when she expects the continuous insurance enforcement body provided for in the Road Safety Act 2006 to be established. [220558]

Jim Fitzpatrick: The current expectation is that DVLA will be the prime public body responsible for delivery of continuous insurance enforcement with a key role being played by the Motor Insurance Bureau which holds the motor insurance database. The detail of the scheme is still under consideration and we intend to consult later in the year, including on the potential timetable for implementation

Road Traffic Control

Stephen Hammond: To ask the Secretary of State for Transport what estimate she has made of the level of road congestion in each of the last five years, broken down by constituency. [217620]

Mr. Tom Harris: The Department for Transport does not hold data on congestion by constituency.

For the strategic roads network in England congestion is monitored using journey time reliability. Journey time reliability is the average delay for the slowest 10 per cent. of journeys measured over the period of a year. Delay is calculated as the difference between observed journey time and a reference journey time (the time that could theoretically be achieved when the traffic is free flowing).

Reliability has only been monitored since the year August 2004-July 2005. Since that time, delays for the slowest 10 per cent. of journeys have increased from 3.78 minutes per 10 miles to 3.92 minutes per 10 miles in the year June 2007-to May 2008. The yearly figures are shown in the following table.

Period Delay for strategic roads in England (minutes per 10 miles)

August 2004 to July 2005

3.78

August 2005 to July 2006

3.78

August 2006 to July 2007

4.19

June 2007 to May 2008

3.92


21 July 2008 : Column 890W

For the large urban networks congestion is monitored through change in peak period speeds. The following table shows peak period speeds across large urban areas in England in 2002, 2004 and 2006, based on surveys conducted by this Department and Transport for London:

Miles per hour

2000-03 2003-06 2006-09

London

Central

9.9

10.6

9.3

Inner

11.6

11.7

11.2

Outer

16.9

16.3


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