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22 July 2008 : Column 1246W—continued

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Prisoners: HIV Infection

David Howarth: To ask the Secretary of State for Justice what the cost was of conducting the most recent Public Health Laboratory Service survey into HIV and hepatitis rates in prisons. [220457]

Maria Eagle: The last Public Health Laboratory Service study of HIV, hepatitis B and hepatitis C prevalence in prisoners in England and Wales was conducted in 1997 and 1998. The cost to the Home Office at that time is not available.

Prisoners: Restraint Techniques

Chris Huhne: To ask the Secretary of State for Justice (1) how many (a) injuries requiring hospital treatment and (b) other injuries have been sustained as a result of the use of control and restraint techniques in each of the last five years, broken down by prison establishment; [221505]

(2) how many times control and restraint techniques have been used on adult prisoners in each of the last five years, broken down by prison establishment. [221506]

Mr. Hanson: The information requested could be obtained only at disproportionate cost and is not available centrally.

Prisons: Capacity

Mrs. Riordan: To ask the Secretary of State for Justice what spare capacity was in prisons at the most recently available date; and if he will make a statement. [220014]


22 July 2008 : Column 1247W

Mr. Straw: I have responsibility for prisons in England and Wales. Prisons in Scotland and Northern Ireland are the responsibility of the Scottish Executive and the Secretary of State for Northern Ireland respectively.

Prison population figures are published every Friday. The total prison population for England and Wales on Friday 18 July was 83,610. This included 47 prisoners held in police accommodation under Operation Safeguard. The total useable operational capacity for England and Wales on 18 July was 83,870 including 400 places through Operation Safeguard. Useable operational capacity is the total number of prisoners that the estate can readily be expected to hold. It assumes an operating margin of 2,000 places to ensure prisoners can be managed by sex, risk category, conviction status, individual needs assessments and geographical distribution.

Prison capacity continues to expand as new places are brought into use.

Prisons: Mental Health Services

John Battle: To ask the Secretary of State for Justice which prisons have a specialist mental health facility; and if he will make a statement. [220712]

Maria Eagle: 102 prisons have in-reach teams that provide a range of services to meet the assessed needs of prisoners. PCTs are responsible for commissioning these services. Information about the facilities in which these services are provided is not held centrally. Prisoners who are severely mentally ill are transferred to appropriate hospital accommodation under the Mental Health Act. Treatment under the Mental Health Act cannot take place in prisons.

There is provision for the treatment of Dangerous and Severe Personality Disorder (DSPD) in DSPD high secure units at HMP Frankland, HMP Whitemoor, and HMP Low Newton; and particular emotional or psychological needs in Therapeutic Communities at HMP Blundeston, HMP Dovegate, HMP Gartree, HMP Grendon and HMP Send.

Prisons: Offensive Weapons

Mr. Garnier: To ask the Secretary of State for Justice if he will introduce proposals to amend the target regime affecting the Prison Service to incentivise (a) the prevention of knives and offensive weapons entering prison premises and (b) the identification and confiscation of any knives and offensive weapons found on prison premises during searches. [219441]

Mr. Straw: Establishments deploy a comprehensive range of robust searching techniques and security measures to detect both weapons being smuggled into prisons and those that may already be concealed in the establishment. Such measures include the rub down and full searching of prisoners, staff and visitors, as appropriate; the use of technical devices, such as metal detectors and x-ray machines; CCTV surveillance and, more recently, use of the bodily orifice security scanner. Routine and intelligence-led searching of living accommodation and communal areas is also widely deployed.

Weapons found within prisons will be seized. A prisoner found in possession of a weapon will be subject to internal disciplinary proceedings and possible prosecution.
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The conveying of an offensive weapon into or out of a prison, or the passing of a weapon to a prisoner, is a criminal offence which can attract a sentence of up to 10 years and/or an unlimited fine.

Prisons: Overcrowding

Mr. Garnier: To ask the Secretary of State for Justice how many prisoners are in cells intended for (a) one and (b) two fewer people than are in the cell. [220911]

Mr. Straw: During 2007-08, 19,321 prisoners were doubled in cells certified to hold one person and 1,161 prisoners were held three to a cell certified for two people.

Prisons: Telephone Services

Mrs. Riordan: To ask the Secretary of State for Justice whether he plans to conduct a review of the cost of telephone calls from prisons. [220097]

Mr. Hanson: There are currently no plans to conduct a review of the cost of telephones calls made from prisons. The National Offender Management Service continues to discuss the cost of calls with the providers but they are not contractually obliged to reduce the cost. To do this without their agreement would require a large subsidy from the taxpayer. The current contract is in place until 2011 and the re-tendering project will commence this year. Reasonable call prices for prisoners will form part of the requirements of the new contract. However, we are implementing reductions for some international calls as part of an extension to a contract with a third party supplier.

Prisons: Waste Management

Dr. Kumar: To ask the Secretary of State for Justice what guidance he provides to prisons on reducing waste from the meals they provide. [219845]

Maria Eagle: It is the policy of the National Offender Management Service not to waste food.

Prison Service Order 5000 (Prison Catering Services) provides staff with guidance on food waste including a number of practical measures and management actions necessary to keep waste to a minimum. These include the use of pre-select menus and portion control.

Rape: Leeds

John Battle: To ask the Secretary of State for Justice what proportion of reported rape cases in Leeds resulted in convictions in each of the last 10 years. [220779]

Maria Eagle: The Home Office collects crime statistics on the number of rape offences recorded by the police in the Leeds crime and disorder reduction partnership (CDRP) area. Rape data at CDRP level are only available from 2001-02 and are shown in table 1.

Police recorded crime (notifiable) data and court proceedings data are not directly comparable. Recorded crime data, published on a financial year basis, concentrates on the number of offences and detections, whereas
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court proceedings data are published on a calendar year basis and concentrates on defendants.

The number of defendants found guilty at all courts for rape offences in West Yorkshire police force area for the years 1997 to 2006 can be viewed in table 2.

From the court proceedings database held by the Ministry of Justice, it is not possible to identify the location of offences, as the data are not collected at this level of detail. Thus West Yorkshire police force area data have been provided in lieu.

These data are on the principal offence basis. The figures given in the table on court proceedings relate to persons for whom these offences were the principal offence for which they were dealt with. When a defendant has been found guilty of two or more offences, the offence selected is the one for which the heaviest penalty is imposed. Where the same disposal is imposed for two or more offences, the offence selected is the offence for which the statutory maximum penalty is the most severe.

Court proceedings data for 2007 will be available in the autumn of 2008.

Recorded rapes in the Leeds crime and disorder reduction partnership area
Financial year Number of offences

2001-02

178

2002-03

177

2003-04

227

2004-05

181

2005-06

225

2006-07

237

2007-08

224

Source:
Recorded Crime Section, Home Office.


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Number of defendants found guilty at all courts for rape offences in West Yorkshire police force area, 1997 to 2006( 1, 2, 3)

Found guilty

1997

23

1998

43

1999

41

2000

38

2001

21

2002

15

2003

30

2004

48

2005

48

2006

37

(1) These data are on the principal offence basis.
(2) Includes the following statutes and corresponding offence description:
Sexual Offences Act 1956 S.1
Rape
Sexual Offences Act 2003 S.1
Rape of a female aged under 16.
Sexual Offences Act 2003 S.1
Rape of a female aged 16 or over.
Sexual Offences Act 2003 S.1
Rape of a male aged under 16.
Sexual Offences Act 2003 S.1
Rape of a male aged 16 or over
Sexual Offences Act 2003 S.5
Rape of a female child under 13 by a male
Sexual Offences Act 2003 S.5
Rape of a male child under 13 by a male
(3) Every effort is made to ensure that the figures presented are accurate and complete. However, it is important to note that these data have been extracted from large administrative data systems generated by the courts, and police forces. As a consequence, care should be taken to ensure data collection processes and their inevitable limitations are taken into account when those data are used.
Source:
CJEAU—Office for Criminal Justice Reform—Ministry of Justice.

Reoffenders

Lady Hermon: To ask the Secretary of State for Justice how many and what proportion of defendants released early under the end of custody licence scheme have re-offended during their additional early release period. [220051]

Mr. Straw: All defendants released under the end of custody scheme are sentenced offenders.

The available information on numbers of offenders released on ECL and those recalled because of alleged re-offending is published monthly, in the statistical bulletin End of Custody Licence releases and recalls, available from the Library of the House and the Ministry of Justice website at the following address:

(The same publication includes details of the eligibility criteria for offenders released under the scheme).

There were 402 individuals alleged to have committed offences during their period of ECL, notified to NOMS Public Protection Unit, for the period 29 June 2007 to 31 May 2008. This represents 1 per cent. of the total number of offenders released under the scheme for the same period, 28,879.

These figures have been drawn from administrative IT systems, which, as with any large-scale recording system, are subject to possible errors with data entry and processing.

Road Traffic Offences

Mr. Amess: To ask the Secretary of State for Justice (1) how many (a) males and (b) females were convicted of offences in England and Wales under sections (i) 14(3), (ii) 15(2) and (iii) 15(4) of the Road Traffic Act 1998 in (A) 2005 and (B) 2006; [219569]

(2) how many (a) males and (b) females aged (i) 17 to 24, (ii) 25 to 30, (iii) 31 to 35, (iv) 36 to 40 and (v) over 40 years were (A) prosecuted and (B) convicted of (1) failing to comply with a road sign, (2) offences under sections (x) 14(3), (y) 15(2) and (z) 15(4) of the Road Traffic Act 1998, (3) failing to provide a breath specimen for analysis, (4) failing to stop for a police constable and (5) disobeying a police constable stopping traffic in (aa) Essex Police area and (bb) Southend Police area in (AA) 2005 and (BB) 2006. [219570]

Maria Eagle: Available data for Essex police force area and England and Wales for the offences requested, for 2005 and 2006 are contained in tables which have been placed in the Library. It is not possible to identify convictions in Southend Police area as the data are not collected at this level of detail by the Ministry of Justice.

The figures given in the table on court proceedings relate to persons for whom these offences were the
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principal offence for which they were dealt with. When a defendant has been found guilty of two or more offences, the offence selected is the one for which the heaviest penalty is imposed. Where the same disposal is imposed for two or more offences, the offence selected is the offence for which the statutory maximum penalty is the most severe.

Information for 2007 will be available in the autumn of 2008.

Secure Training Centres: Restraint Techniques

Mr. Cox: To ask the Secretary of State for Justice if he will publish the review of restraint in juvenile secure settings. [219702]

Mr. Hanson: I refer the hon. Member to my previous answer to my hon. Friend the Member for Northampton, North (Ms Keeble) on 15 July 2008, Official Report, column 367W.

The Government are giving careful consideration to the recommendations of the chairs of the independent review of restraint in juvenile secure settings, Andrew Williamson and Peter Smallridge. We intend to publish the chairs' full report alongside our response to its recommendations by the end of October.

Supreme Court

Hywel Williams: To ask the Secretary of State for Justice what the (a) original and (b) current expected opening date of the new Supreme Court building is. [220610]

Mr. Straw: The initial planned opening date for the Supreme Court was October 2008. This was reviewed once detailed survey work and planning conditions were finalised. The amount of work required and the quality of refurbishment necessary would not have been possible in that time-frame. It was announced in March 2006 that the Supreme Court would therefore open in October 2009 to ensure there would be no encroachment into judicial hearing time.

The revised schedule of works allows sufficient time to complete a high-quality refurbishment of a historic listed building and deliver a world-class organisation that properly meets the expectations of the public, the Law Lords, the legal profession and court users. The programme is on target to deliver this in October 2009.


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