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29 Sep 2008 : Column 2352W—continued

Police Patrolling

Mr. Bone: To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department what the average time spent by a police officer on street patrol in (a) Northamptonshire and (b) England and Wales was in each of the last 10 years. [224072]

Mr. McNulty [holding answer 17 September 2008]: Information on time spent on patrol by police officers has only been collected since 2003-04. Values for Northamptonshire are set out in table A and values for England and Wales in table B.

Time spent on patrol refers only to time when an officer is patrolling, but engaged in no other duty. Activity (such as advice to a member of the public) carried out while on patrol is recorded separately. The percentage of time spent on patrol needs to be considered alongside other activities. We use the front-line policing measure to provide a fuller picture of police officer activity, and figures for this measure for England and Wales are also given in the tables.

The measure assesses time spent by police officers on core policing duties such as patrol, responding to 999 calls, as well as activities of CID and specialist officers. While these officers are not always visible to the public, they are none the less carrying out core policing duties.

I am told by Northamptonshire police that they have invested significantly in proactive crime fighting activities to address serious and organised crime, major crime and terrorism. This focused activity has contributed to a reduction in crime for the people of Northamptonshire, but is not included in time on patrol.

I am also told that in Northamptonshire, police responses to incidents requiring a rapid emergency response have risen by 20 per cent. This represents almost 9,000 more prioritised emergency responses to the public in 2007-08 compared to 2004-05. Public satisfaction at police response to incidents in Northamptonshire is also rising, and public confidence in policing in
29 Sep 2008 : Column 2353W
Northamptonshire (as measured by the British crime survey) has risen by almost 10 per cent. in the past 18 months.

Table A: Time spent on patrol and front-line policing measure, Northamptonshire, 2003-04 to 2007-08
Percentage

Time spent on patrol( 1, 2) Front-line policing measure( 3)

2003-04

13.9

66.7

2004-05

15.0

59.7

2005-06

13.1

65.4

2006-07

11.5

64.3

2007-08

10.2


Table B : Time spent on patrol and front-line policing measure, England and Wales , 2003-04 to 2007-08
Percentage

Time spent on patrol( 1, 2) Front-line policing measure( 3)

2003-04

14.2

63.6

2004-05

15.3

62.3

2005-06

14.0

63.6

2006-07

13.6

64.2

2007-08

(4)13.8

(1) Data was not collected before 2003. The information is taken from activity analysis, which is collected by all forces over a two-week period in each year and provides a snapshot of how officers are deployed.
(2) Includes only officers on foot/car/beat patrol, CID and traffic officers. These values exclude PCSOs.
(3) Data was not collected before 2003. 2007-08 data not yet available.
(4) Data does not include Derbyshire and Staffordshire.

Police: Greater London

Lyn Brown: To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department how much on average it costs to employ a police constable in the London borough of (a) Newham, (b) Hackney and (c) Tower Hamlets annually. [223527]

Mr. McNulty [holding answer 15 September 2008]: Average pay and pay-related cost of employing a full-time police officer (of rank sergeant or below) are calculated based on the 2006-07 Annual Survey of Hours and Earnings (ASHE) at regional level. This information is not available at police force area level.

It has been estimated that the average pay and pay related cost of employing a full-time police officer in 2006-07 was approximately £45,830 in England and Wales.

The cost of training and non-pay related costs such as premises, supplies and transport are not included in this estimate.

Lyn Brown: To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department what the capital spend on the police service in the London boroughs of (a) Newham, (b) Hackney and (c) Tower Hamlets was in each of the last five years. [223530]

Mr. McNulty [holding answer 15 September 2008]: The information requested is not held centrally.

The management of the police estate and allocation of resources are matters for the Metropolitan Police Authority and the Commissioner, who are responsible for assessing local needs.


29 Sep 2008 : Column 2354W

Police: International Co-operation

Mr. Grieve: To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department pursuant to the written ministerial statement of 25 April 2008, Official Report, columns 119-21WS, on the Justice and Home Affairs Council, (1) how many times UK officers have been part of joint investigation teams performing operations in other member states in the last five years; [219490]

(2) how many times joint investigation teams have performed operations in the UK in the last five years; [219491]

(3) what powers European police officers acting as part of the joint investigation teams have on UK territory. [219492]

Jacqui Smith: We are aware of just one joint investigation team operation having been established under the provisions of the Convention on Mutual Assistance in Criminal Matters 2000 involving United Kingdom law enforcement. This was a joint United Kingdom and Netherlands drugs investigation which took place in 2005, to which there was a successful outcome.

All members of a joint investigation team would be subject to the laws of the country in which the team is operating. Law enforcement officials from another member state act in a support and advisory capacity and would not have police powers when the team is operating in the United Kingdom. Teams operating in the United Kingdom would be under the strict control of a United Kingdom team leader.

Police: Labour Turnover

Mr. Crausby: To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department what the percentage change in the number of full-time police officers in Bolton North East has been since 1997. [223670]

Mr. McNulty [holding answer 15 September 2008]: The information requested is not collected centrally.

Data on police personnel strength are collected by police force area, and have additionally been collected by Basic Command Unit (BCU) level from 2003 onwards.

The number of full-time equivalent (FTE) police officers in Greater Manchester police has increased by 14.6 per cent., between 31 March 1997 and 31 March 2008.

The number of FTE police officers in the Bolton BCU has increased by 3.0 per cent., between 31 March 2003 and 31 March 2008.

Police: Manpower

Mr. Bone: To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department how many police officers there were in each police force in each of the last 10 years; and how many police officers there were per 1,000 population in each police force area in each year. [223630]

Mr. McNulty [holding answer 15 September 2008]: The information requested is published in the annual Home Office Statistical Bulletin series “Police Service Strength, England and Wales”, copies of which are available online and in the Library of the House.

The latest bulletin contains data correct as at 31 March 2008, and can be downloaded from:


29 Sep 2008 : Column 2355W

Table 4 shows police officer strength by force and the number of police officers per 100,000 population.

Police: Public Participation

James Brokenshire: To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department to what extent she plans to implement the recommendations contained in the report by Louise Casey, “Engaging Communities in Fighting Crime”. [223503]

Mr. Coaker [holding answer 15 September 2008]: Following the Casey review, the Home Secretary announced that we will immediately take forward Community Champions, and the Policing Green Paper "From the Neighbourhood to the National: Policing Our Communities Together" sets out our response in more detail. This includes the police service commitment to implement crime maps for every area and the new standard for the police service—The Policing Pledge—by the end of the year. The Government have appointed Louise Casey to a new role of Neighbourhood Crime and Justice Adviser based in the Home Office to help implement her proposals.

Racially Aggravated Offences

Mr. Ruffley: To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department how many racially-motivated crimes were recorded in each police force area in each of the last five years. [223522]

Mr. Coaker [holding answer 15 September 2008]: The available statistics relate to racially or religiously aggravated offences recorded by the police and are given in the following table. It is not possible to separately identify those of a racial nature from those of a religious nature.


29 Sep 2008 : Column 2356W
Total racially or religiously aggravated offences( 1) recorded by the police in England and Wales, 2003-04 to 2007-08
Number
Police force area 2003-04 2004-05 2005-06 2006-07 2007-08

Avon and Somerset

1,256

1,431

1,326

1,337

1,027

Bedfordshire

207

266

339

308

292

British Transport Police

652

946

1,088

1,188

1,316

Cambridgeshire

384

398

322

351

365

Cheshire

400

438

569

557

536

Cleveland

251

288

528

464

390

Cumbria

116

186

232

219

187

Derbyshire

600

474

494

492

554

Devon and Cornwall

588

694

818

809

696

Dorset

166

254

214

291

294

Durham

138

154

258

304

245

Dyfed-Powys

126

154

118

167

125

Essex

760

807

796

922

913

Gloucestershire

167

215

283

326

264

Greater Manchester

2,864

3,203

3,398

3,677

3,637

Gwent

240

233

289

269

234

Hampshire

415

570

1,120

1,326

1,320

Hertfordshire

730

859

985

954

846

Humberside

438

488

417

655

407

Kent

480

609

798

935

858

Lancashire

1,085

1,183

1,363

1,238

1,042

Leicestershire

809

980

1,007

1,055

941

Lincolnshire

179

169

200

143

101

London, City of

60

48

75

83

73

Merseyside

943

1,061

1,420

1,423

1,100

Metropolitan Police

9,468

9,444

8,769

8,226

7,353

Norfolk

268

333

343

340

265

Northamptonshire

413

389

455

422

455

Northumbria

974

886

834

924

729

North Wales

278

331

396

356

316

North Yorkshire

54

133

205

234

172

Nottinghamshire

619

551

566

715

793

South Wales

794

735

713

555

611

South Yorkshire

259

471

1,032

1,037

927

Staffordshire

600

646

805

889

760

Suffolk

297

244

240

329

328

Surrey

482

510

845

588

305

Sussex

552

575

710

991

776

Thames Valley

1,104

1,154

1,128

1,483

1,233

Warwickshire

187

222

293

379

416

West Mercia

674

609

527

499

503

West Midlands

2,479

2,413

3,071

3,338

3,249

West Yorkshire

1,874

2,140

2,898

2,691

2,493

Wiltshire

244

220

260

253

196

England and Wales total

35,674

38,114

42,547

43,742

39,643

(1 )There are currently seven racially or religiously aggravated offence classifications within the recorded crime series. They are as follows: less serious wounding, harassment, assault without injury, criminal damage to a dwelling, criminal damage to a building other than a dwelling, criminal damage to a vehicle and other criminal damage.

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