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Children: Advertising

Mr. Jim Cunningham: To ask the Secretary of State for Children, Schools and Families what recent steps the Government have taken to regulate advertising aimed at children. [222678]

Jim Knight: All commercial broadcasters are subject to statutory standards codes governing broadcast advertising which they must comply with as a condition of their licence. Non-broadcast advertising in the UK is strictly controlled through industry self-regulation, administered by the Advertising Standards Authority (ASA).

Both the broadcast and non-broadcast advertising codes contain strict rules relating specifically to general children’s advertising as well as specific rules preventing the promotion of products such as alcohol and cigarettes, as well as restricting food promotion to children.

Changes introduced by Ofcom in February 2007 strengthened the rules for broadcast advertising of foods high in fat, salt and sugar—which may not be advertised in or adjacent to programmes commissioned for, principally directed at or likely to appeal particularly to audiences below the age of 16. Ofcom also set out new rules on the content of advertisements targeted at primary school children. These rules ban the use of celebrities and characters licensed from third-parties (such as cartoons), promotional claims (such as free gifts) and health or nutrition claims.

Non-broadcast advertising rules, including on the internet, were also strengthened in 2007.

The new rules protect all children, defined as persons under 16. In addition, ASA/Committee of Advertising Practice have placed tougher restrictions on food or drink product adverts that are directly targeted at primary school or pre-school children through their content.

Mr. Jim Cunningham: To ask the Secretary of State for Children, Schools and Families what recent steps the Government have taken to assess the effect of advertising on children. [222679]

Jim Knight: This Government launched an independent assessment of the impact of the commercial world, with open calls for evidence, on 7 April 2008. The assessment is examining children’s commercial world in the broadest sense, including: products; commercial messages; shopping; the market for children’s good and services; and any further involvement that children may have. The assessment is not restricted to advertising.

The assessment is being led by Professor David Buckingham—Professor of Education at the Institute of Education, London university. He is the founder and director of the Centre for the Study of Children, Youth and Media. The assessment panel is made up of leading experts from a range of disciplines.

We think it is important that we reach a consensus as to what is changing for children with regard to the commercial world; how those changes impact on children, both positive and negative, and what children and parents really think.

This assessment will report back to DCSF and DCMS in spring 2009.


8 Oct 2008 : Column 672W

Departmental Manpower

Mr. Hunt: To ask the Secretary of State for Children, Schools and Families how much was spent on salaries for press and communications officers in (a) his Department, (b) its NDPBs and (c) its agencies in each of the last three years. [224548]

Sarah McCarthy-Fry: The information is as follows.

Departmental Standards

Michael Gove: To ask the Secretary of State for Children, Schools and Families what targets were not achieved by his Department in each of the last 10 years. [224811]

Sarah McCarthy-Fry: The Department published its autumn performance report on 7 December 2007 and copies are available in the House Library (Cm 7279). The autumn performance report shows assessments of progress against my Department’s Spending Review public service agreement (PSA) targets. Annex B contains summary tables showing final assessments for PSA targets from 1998. The 2008 departmental report (Cm7391) published on 19 May 2008 included latest assessments of progress against Spending Review 2004 PSA targets and the 2008 autumn performance report due to be published later this year will include final assessments for those Spending Review 2004 PSA targets which have now come to an end.

Michael Gove: To ask the Secretary of State for Children, Schools and Families if he will place in the Library a list of the (a) targets and (b) quantifiable aims which his Department is committed to meeting. [224925]

Sarah McCarthy-Fry: The Department published its Children’s Plan on 11 December 2007 which set out the vision for children and children’s services, our delivery plans for the next three years and put those in the context of our longer term ambitions for improving children and young people’s lives. The Department leads on five cross-governmental PSAs for children and young people which were announced in CSR07. They are:


8 Oct 2008 : Column 673W

A series of indicators underpin each PSA, a number of which make up part of the local government National Indicator Set. All the indicators are brought together through the Every Child Matters (ECM) outcomes framework. The 2008 autumn performance report due to be published later in the year, will for the first time, include reporting against the 2007 comprehensive spending review PSAs which the Department leads on. PSA Delivery Agreements are available on the HM Treasury website at:

Grammar Schools

Mr. Laws: To ask the Secretary of State for Children, Schools and Families what (a) legislative changes and (b) departmental approval would be needed to open a new grammar school; and if he will make a statement. [224666]

Jim Knight: The law prohibits the introduction of any new selection by ability. We intend no change to this. Local parents can decide whether each existing grammar school continues, and ballot accordingly.

Grammar Schools: Disadvantaged

Mr. Laws: To ask the Secretary of State for Children, Schools and Families (1) what proportion of pupils attending grammar schools was known to be eligible for free school meals in (a) 1978, (b) 2007 and (c) 2008; and if he will make a statement; [224672]

(2) what proportion of pupils was entitled to free school meals in (a) grammar schools, (b) academies and (c) all other maintained schools in each year from 1997 to 2008; and if he will make a statement. [224674]

Jim Knight: The requested information could be provided only at disproportionate cost.

Head Teachers: Temporary Employment

Mr. Graham Stuart: To ask the Secretary of State for Children, Schools and Families how many schools in Yorkshire and the Humber have temporary headteachers; and if he will make a statement. [223819]

Jim Knight: The information is not available in the format requested.

In January 2008, there were 40 head teacher posts in Yorkshire and the Humber Government office region that were either vacant or temporarily filled. In England, there were 550.

Posts were counted where there is no incumbent who is expected to return to the post, whether or not it is filled or on a temporary basis, whether or not advertised or an appointment has been made and not yet taken up.


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Head Teachers

Michael Gove: To ask the Secretary of State for Children, Schools and Families how many headteachers between the ages of 55 and 60 years there are in maintained schools in each local authority. [224798]

Jim Knight: The information is not available in the format requested.

Information for the proportion of full-time heads employed in local authority maintained schools in England by age group is available from the Departments website (table D4) at the following web link:

Joint Advisory Council for Qualifications

Mr. Laws: To ask the Secretary of State for Children, Schools and Families (1) what the remit of the Joint Advisory Council for Qualifications will be; and if he will make a statement; [225118]

(2) whom he expects to appoint as the (a) chair and (b) chief executive of the Joint Advisory Council for Qualifications; and if he will make a statement; [225119]

(3) when he expects the Joint Advisory Council for Qualifications to be in operation; and if he will make a statement; [225120]

(4) where the Joint Advisory Council for Qualifications will be based; and if he will make a statement. [225121]

Jim Knight: The remit of the Joint Advisory Committee for Qualifications Approval (JACQA) is to give advice to the Secretary of State on which 14-19 qualifications should be publicly funded, in line with the policy set out in the 14-19 qualifications strategy, which we published in March this year. We will publish a formal remit for the Committee in advance of its first meeting, which we expect to take place in December this year.

The Committee will be co-chaired by and jointly responsible to the Qualifications and Curriculum Development Agency (QCDA) and the Learning and Skills Council (LSC). These organisations will also provide a joint secretariat to the Committee. The secretariat is currently considering the logistical arrangements for the Committee's inaugural meeting. The Committee will not exist on a statutory basis, and will not have any executive or decision-making powers. It will therefore not have a chief executive officer.

National Curriculum Tests

Mr. Laws: To ask the Secretary of State for Children, Schools and Families what representations were received by (a) his Department, (b) the Qualifications and Curriculum Authority and (c) the National Assessment Agency on the arrangements for administration and marking of the key stage tests for 2008 in (i) 2006 and (ii) 2007; and if he will make a statement. [221790]

Jim Knight: The Department received correspondence in 2006 and 2007 about aspects of the national curriculum tests but nothing specific to the administration and
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marking of Key Stage tests for 2008. Ministers meet with Teachers’ Unions on a regular basis, where national curriculum tests will feature on the agenda.

The Qualifications and Curriculum Authority (QCA) is responsible for the development and administration of National Curriculum tests. The National Assessment Agency (NAA) administers the tests and manages the delivery contract, on QCA’s behalf. In 2006, NAA undertook a procurement exercise and received representations from prospective contractors. In both 2006 and 2007 the NAA received representations from schools, local authorities, parents and our social partners on a variety of matters about national curriculum tests.

Mr. Laws: To ask the Secretary of State for Children, Schools and Families (1) how many prospective markers for (a) key stage two and (b) key stage three failed the tests for marking quality at the (i) standardisation stage and (ii) monitoring stage in (A) science, (B) mathematics and (C) English in each year from 2005 to 2008; and if he will make a statement; [221791]

(2) how many markers were employed to mark the key stage (a) two and (b) three tests in (i) English, (ii) mathematics and (iii) science in (A) 2006, (B) 2007 and (C) 2008; and if he will make a statement. [221792]

Jim Knight: The Qualifications and Curriculum Authority (QCA) is responsible for the development and administration of national curriculum tests. The National Assessment Agency (NAA) administers the tests and manages the delivery contract, on QCA’s behalf. David Gee, Managing Director of the NAA has written to the hon. Member and a copy of his letter has been placed in the Library.

Letter from David Gee, dated 4 October 2008:

2005 2006 2007 2008

No. failed standardisation KS2 E

(1)

(1)

(1)

9

No. failed standardisation KS2 M

(1)

(1)

(1)

0

No. failed standardisation KS2 S

(1)

(1)

(1)

6

No. failed standardisation KS3 R

(1)

(1)

(1)

21

No. failed standardisation KS3 W

(1)

(1)

(1)

13

No. failed standardisation KS3 M

(1)

(1)

(1)

1

No. failed standardisation KS3 S

(1)

(1)

(1)

11

(1) This information was not requested in the Edexcel contract

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No. failed during marking (stopped) 2006 2007 2008

No. stopped KS2 E

22

3

(1)5 (9)

No. stopped KS2 M

16

30

(1)5 (9)

No. stopped KS2 S

14

11

(1)20 (24)

No. stopped KS3 R

37

25

(1)35 (51)

No. stopped KS3 W

51

27

(1)50 (65)

No. stopped KS3 M

70

21

(1)8 (13)

No. stopped KS3 S

70

73

(1)28 (51)

(1) First number indicates the number of markers that were stopped after failing both attempts at a benchmark set and were stopped. The number in brackets represents the number of markers who failed either two benchmark sets or failed the first attempt and never attempted the second.

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