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14 Oct 2008 : Column 1152W—continued


Figures for 2007 will be published in November 2008. Further information can be found in table D2 of the “School Workforce in England (including pupil: teacher ratios and pupil: adult ratios), January 2007 (Revised)” Statistical First Release accessible via the link:

Teachers: Qualifications

Michael Gove: To ask the Secretary of State for Children, Schools and Families (1) how many teachers took a primary (a) B.Ed or BA and (b) PGCE with a language specialism in each of the last three years for which figures are available; [225835]

(2) how many teachers took (a) a PGCE, (b) a BEd or BA, (c) a SCITT and (d) another teacher training route at primary level with a specialism in (i) Mandarin, (ii) Japanese, (iii) Urdu, (iv) Italian, (v) French, (vi) Spanish and (vii) German in each of the last five years. [225837]

Jim Knight: The available information is given in the table and shows recruitment to undergraduate and postgraduate initial teacher training (ITT) courses in primary modern languages for the last five years for which data are available. There are currently no primary ITT courses which specialise in Mandarin; Japanese or Urdu.

Over the last five years nearly 4,000 trainees in total graduated through ITT courses in primary modern languages. More trainees will be funded for these courses, including a projected 900 in 2008/09.

The Training and Development Agency for Schools is also piloting this year, in partnership with 10 ITT providers, additional routes to boost the primary work force teaching languages. A projected 3,000 trainees will go through these courses in 2008/09. Of these trainees, about one third are postgraduate trainees and two thirds are undergraduate trainees.


14 Oct 2008 : Column 1153W

14 Oct 2008 : Column 1154W
Number of new entrants on primary modern foreign language ITT courses between 2003/04 and 2007/08
Total number of new entrants

Primary—French Primary—German Primary—Italian Primary—Spanish Primary—Portuguese Primary—total modern foreign languages

2003/04

Undergraduate

60

10

0

10

0

80

Postgraduate

280

30

0

50

0

360

O f which:

School centred (SCITT)

0

0

0

0

0

0

Total

330

40

0

60

0

430

2004/05

Undergraduate

60

30

0

30

0

130

Postgraduate

290

60

20

60

0

440

O f which:

School centred (SCITT)

(1)

0

0

0

0

(1)

Total

360

90

20

100

0

570

2005/06

Undergraduate

60

10

0

20

0

90

Postgraduate

320

70

30

140

10

570

of which:

School centred (SCITT)

(1)

0

0

0

0

(1)

Total

380

80

30

160

10

650

2006/07

Undergraduate

70

20

0

20

0

110

Postgraduate

320

80

40

160

10

600

O f which:

School centred (SCITT)

0

0

0

0

0

0

Total

390

100

40

180

10

710

2007/08( 2)

Undergraduate

90

10

0

30

0

120

Postgraduate

330

80

40

140

0

590

O f which:

School centred (SCITT)

0

0

0

0

0

0

Total

420

90

40

170

0

710

(1) Less than five.
(2) Figures for 2007/08 are provisional and are subject to change.
Notes:
1. Coverage includes universities and other HE institutions, SCITT and OU, but excludes employment based routes.
2. Figures include trainees who are re-sitting all or part of their ITT programme.
3. Figures trainees on courses of one to five year durations.
4. Figures are individually rounded to the nearest 10 and may not sum to total.
Source:
TDA ITT Trainee Number Census

Michael Gove: To ask the Secretary of State for Children, Schools and Families how many and what percentage of teachers teaching (a) mathematics, (b) physics, (c) chemistry and (d) biology who were awarded a golden hello in each year since 2000 were still in the teaching profession (i) one, (ii) two, (iii) three, (iv) four and (v) five years after receiving the award. [226050]

Jim Knight: The requested information could be produced only at a disproportionate cost.

Teachers: Vetting

Mr. Drew: To ask the Secretary of State for Children, Schools and Families what advice the Department gives to local authorities on whether (a) head teachers, (b) teaching staff, (c) non-teaching school staff and (d) governors should be checked by the Criminal Records Bureau prior to commencing their duties or subsequent to so doing. [225427]

Beverley Hughes: Advice on this issue can be found in paragraphs 4.24, 4.25, and 4.58 of Safeguarding Children and Safer Recruitment in Education which came into effect in January 2007. CRB disclosures for new appointments to head teacher, teaching and non teaching posts should be obtained before staff begin work. If this is not possible they should be obtained as soon as possible after appointment. Such appointments will be conditional upon receipt of a satisfactory CRB disclosure. We do recognise that occasionally there can be problems obtaining disclosures prior to starting work. Head teachers, principals and local authorities therefore have the option to allow people to start work while waiting for a disclosure to be processed. In such cases they need to ensure that the individual is appropriately supervised and that all other checks including a List 99 check have been completed. Disclosures are not required if the person is moving from a similar post in a school, local authority or FE college and there has not been a break in employment of more than three months. Governors are not required to have an enhanced disclosure unless their duties include regular work in the presence of children, or who care for, train, supervise or are in sole charge of children. Governors who do not require a disclosure are asked to sign a declaration confirming their suitability to fulfil their role. Governors will be required to register with the new mandatory work force vetting scheme administered by the Independent Safeguarding Authority.

Teachers: Working Hours

Michael Gove: To ask the Secretary of State for Children, Schools and Families what estimate he has made of the number of hours per week (a) teachers and (b) headteachers spent on administrative functions required by (i) the local education authority, (ii) his Department and (iii) other organisations in the most recent period for which figures are available. [226051]

Jim Knight: Estimates of the average number of hours per week spent by teachers and head teachers on individual activities are published by the Office of Manpower Economics (OME). The available information on average time spent on general administrative tasks is shown in the following table:

Average hours spent per week on general administrative support by full-time head teachers and classroom teachers
Primary schools Secondary schools

Head teacher Classroom teacher Head teacher Classroom teacher

Keeping records on pupil performance (e.g. for National Curriculum school records, examination boards etc)

0.2

0.5

0.1

0.4

Keeping records or department records (excluding those on pupil performance

0.6

0.1

0.1

0.1

Organising resources and premises (e.g. buildings, equipment, books, computers)

0.8

0.8

0.3

0.6

Displaying/mounting pupils' work or information for pupils

0.1

0.6

0.1

Setting up/tidying classroom, lab or other teaching area

0.2

2.0

0.9

Simple clerical activity (e.g. photocopying)

0.2

0.4

0.1

0.4

Other kinds of administrative activities

1.8

0.3

2.5

0.6

Total admin

3.9

4.7

3.0

3.1

Total all working activities

55.2

52.2

59.5

49.9

Percentage of all working activities spent on admin

7

9

5

6

Source:
Teachers' Workloads Diary Survey, March 2008

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