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23 Oct 2008 : Column 513W—continued


Leave to remain applications received for the London borough of Bexley 1 April 2008 to 30 September 2008

Number of applications

Borough of Bexley

1,075

Note:
Figures are rounded to the nearest five.

The figures quoted are not provided under National Statistics protocols and have been derived from local management information and are therefore provisional and subject to change.

Immigration: Children in Care

Keith Vaz: To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department what estimate she has made of the number of under 18-year-olds that arrived unaccompanied in the UK and were taken into care but subsequently went missing in (a) 2007 and (b) 1997. [229035]

Sarah McCarthy-Fry: I have been asked for reply.

The numbers of children looked after who went missing from local authority care in each of the last five years are shown in the following tables. Further information can be provided only at a disproportionate cost.

(a) The number of children looked after who went missing from care for 24 hours or more, in each of the years ending 31 March 2003 to 2007, including asylum-seeking children, was as follows:

Number

2003

990

2004

730

2005

860

2006

890

2007

950


These figures account for all children looked after excluding children looked after under an agreed series of short term placements.

(b) The number of asylum-seeking children who went missing from care for 24 hours or more, in each of the years ending 31 March 2003 to 2007, was as follows:


23 Oct 2008 : Column 514W

Number

2003

70

2004

50

2005

70

2006

110

2007

90

Note:
For both answers, where a child went missing from his or her agreed placement, for 24 hours or more, on more than one occasion during the same year, he or she has been counted only once.

The figures show the number of children looked after that went missing for a period of 24 hours or more. Some of these may have subsequently returned to care.

Immigration: Criminal Records

Mr. Clappison: To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department what guidelines have been issued by her Department on the grant of indefinite leave to remain (ILR) under the legacy exercise to individuals with criminal convictions in the UK or in another country; what checks are carried out to ascertain the existence of a criminal record in (a) the UK and (b) another country in the case of those being considered for ILR under this exercise; and in this exercise how many people have been (i) found to have a criminal record in the UK, (ii) found to have a criminal record in another country, (iii) refused ILR because of a criminal record in the UK and (iv) refused ILR because of a criminal conviction in another country. [188653]

Mr. Woolas: All decisions are made on a case by case basis under existing law and policy. The UK Border Agency’s website, as follows, provides details of policy and guidance that staff follow. This information is published as part of our commitment to freedom of information. Information on the number of cases found to be of those with criminal records in the UK and abroad (i-ii) and information on those refused ILR because of a criminal record in the UK and abroad (iii-iv) could be obtained by examination of individual case records only at disproportionate cost.

Offenders: Deportation

Keith Vaz: To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department what the average period of time was between a foreign national prisoner finishing their sentence and being deported in the last 12 months; and if she will make a statement. [196771]

Mr. Woolas: The Chief Executive of the UK Border Agency advised the Home Affairs Committee in her letter of 23 July that the Agency is now removing or deporting around a fifth of all individuals direct from prison an average of 180 days before their release date. For the remaining individuals it is taking the Agency around 130 days, on average, to deport or remove them from the UK.

Offenders: Genetics

Mr. Ruffley: To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department how many DNA samples were taken from people (a) charged and (b) cautioned (i) in each police area and (ii) in total in each of the last five years; and if she will make a statement. [198596]


23 Oct 2008 : Column 515W

Meg Hillier: The Criminal Justice Act 2003 (which came into effect in 2004) amended the Police and Criminal Evidence Act to give police the power to take a DNA sample from anyone arrested for a recordable offence and held in a police station. Since then, DNA samples have usually been taken following arrest, rather than at the later stages when a person is charged or cautioned. Information on the number of those from whom a DNA sample is taken who are later (a) charged and (b) cautioned is not available.

Official Residences

Mr. Hoban: To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department what the cost of (a) maintenance, (b) electricity, (c) heating and (d) other bills for the ministerial residence in South Eaton Place has been since it was vacated. [221191]

Mr. Woolas: I refer the hon. Member to replies given on 17 March 2008, Official Report, column 807W and 28 April 2008, Official Report, column 100W.

Police: Football

Keith Vaz: To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department (1) how football clubs are charged for the cost of policing during games; who is responsible for the level of such charges; and what criteria are used in such decisions; [227564]

(2) what her policy is on the scope of policing costs that football clubs should be liable for; and if she will make a statement; [227565]

(3) what estimate she has made of the proportion of costs of policing football matches and related fan movements not met by football clubs. [227566]

Mr. Alan Campbell: Policing at football matches in England and Wales is a special police services as provided for by section 25(1) of the Police Act 1996. That section provides that the local chief officer of police determines the need for and scale of any police deployment while the local police authority determines the scale of charges imposed for such deployments, section 25(1) is currently subject to judicial proceedings involving Greater Manchester Police and Wigan Athletic Football Club. We will consider carefully the interpretation of the court when it is available.

No record is held centrally of the cost of all football-related policing activity. 41 per cent. of all matches played in England and Wales during the 2007-08 football season were designated as 'police-free' on the basis of police risk assessment.

Sex Establishments: Regulation

Mr. Ellwood: To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department what powers are available to local authorities wishing to regulate the establishment of lap dancing clubs. [228889]

Mr. Alan Campbell [holding answer 21 October 2008]: Lap dancing clubs that supply alcohol or provide entertainment in the form of music or dance must obtain an appropriate permission under the Licensing Act 2003 (the 2003 Act). If, following representations and a hearing, the licensing authority believes an application
23 Oct 2008 : Column 516W
for a licence under the 2003 Act is contrary to the promotion of the four licensing objectives (prevention of crime and disorder, public safety, prevention of public nuisance and the protection of children from harm) it may refuse the application or grant the licence subject to conditions.

Lap dancing clubs are also subject to the law relating to public decency (Indecent Displays Act 1981) and brothel keeping (Sexual Offences Act 1956).

The planning system also provides local authorities with powers to help manage the number of lap dancing clubs in an area, having regard to local circumstances and any other material considerations. Following consultation with local authorities, the Home Secretary recently announced the Government’s intention to give local communities a stronger say over the establishment of lap dancing clubs in their area. A number of measures are currently being considered in order to achieve this.

Smuggling: Meat

Mr. Paice: To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department how many meat detection sniffer dogs were in use at ports and airports in Great Britain on (a) 1 January and (b) 1 July in each year since 2002. [228519]

Mr. Woolas: Detector dogs trained to identify products of animal origin (POAO) including meat were introduced by DEFRA in 2002, and were transferred to HMRC in April 2003. The number of POAO Detector dogs in use at ports and airports in Great Britain on 1 January and 1 July in each year since 2002 is set out as follows:

Number of dogs in use on 1 January Number of dogs in use on 1 July

2002

0

2

2003

2

2

2004

5

6

2005

10

10

2006

10

11

2007

11

11

2008

9

9


These dogs are employed on a mobile basis across Great Britain. The actual number available for deployment can differ according to the need to train new dogs and handlers, and to replace dogs through retirement and ill health.

We cannot disclose further information about the deployment of the dogs as this would provide information of value to those seeking to circumvent border controls, thereby prejudicing the prevention and detection of crime.

UK Border Agency: Data Protection

Mr. Lancaster: To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department what measures are in place to ensure that sensitive financial data required by the UK Border Agency to be sent overseas by those sponsoring applicants for visas is protected. [228648]

Mr. Woolas: Where an applicant states that they will be maintained and accommodated in the UK by their sponsor, it is reasonable to expect the applicant to
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provide evidence of their sponsor's ability to do so. All supporting documents, including any documents provided by an applicant about their sponsor, are treated confidentially and in accordance with the provisions of the Data Protection Act by all UK visa-issuing posts overseas.

Health

Advisory Group on Hepatitis

Mr. Laxton: To ask the Secretary of State for Health what the (a) date of appointment and (b) expected
23 Oct 2008 : Column 518W
date of end of term of office is of each member of (i) the Advisory Group on Hepatitis and (ii) the Joint Committee on Vaccination and Immunisation. [229620]

Dawn Primarolo: The information requested is shown in the following tables.

Advisory Group on Hepatitis
Name Date of appointment( 1) Date of end of term( 2)

Professor Howard Thomas (Chair)

1 November 1999

31 December 2008

Professor William Irving (Vice Chair)

1 July 1998

30 June 2009

Professor Margaret Bassendine

1 August 2005

31 July 2011

Mrs. Joan Bell

1 March 2007

28 February 2010

Professor Graham Foster

1 August 2005

31 July 2010

Mr. Christopher Liffen

1 August 2005

31 July 2010

Dr. Alan Mitchell

1 August 2005

31 July 2011

Dr. Peter Moss

1 August 2005

31 July 2011

Dr. Elizabeth Murphy

1 February 2008

31 January 2011

Dr. Christopher Packham

4 April 2008

3 April 2011

Mr. Raymond Poll

1 August 2005

31 July 2010

Dr. R. Nicholas Pugh

1 March 2007

28 February 2010

Professor Richard Tedder

1 April 2000

31 December 2009

Dr. C.Y. William Tong

1 March 2007

28 February 2010


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