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27 Oct 2008 : Column 654W—continued



27 Oct 2008 : Column 655W
Table 3: Spend per head in Primary Care Trusts 2006-07 to 2007-08
£
PCT name 2006-07 2007-08

Bath and North East Somerset PCT

1,178.32

1,271.20

Bournemouth and Poole PCT

1,295.07

1,397.54

Bristol PCT

1,360.55

1,542.74

Cornwall and Isles of Scilly PCT

1,240.05

1,417.12

Devon PCT

1,286.92

1,410.25

Dorset PCT

1,248.86

1,371.87

Gloucestershire PCT

1,190.68

1,297.50

North Somerset PCT

1,243.56

1,381.53

Plymouth Teaching PCT

1,382.88

1,497.40

Somerset PCT

1,229.22

1,337.75

South Gloucestershire PCT

1,170.28

1,254.85

Swindon PCT

1,200.43

1,322.45

Torbay Care PCT

1,358.22

1,543.58

Wiltshire PCT

1,136.41

1,200.34

Notes:
1. The England figure includes expenditure reported in the audited health authority and strategic health authority summarisation schedules for 1997-98 to 2007-08, plus the audited PCT summarisation schedules 2001-02 to 2007-08 and the dental and pharmaceutical services expenditure for England reported by the former Dental Practice Board and Prescription Pricing Authority and the current NHS Business Services Authority.
2. PCT expenditure is from the audited summarisation schedules 2001-02 to 2007-08.
3. Population figures are ONS estimates 1997-98 to 2007-08.
4. Note that the expenditure reported by PCTs does not represent all NHS spending, e.g. strategic health authority and dental and pharmaceutical services expenditure is not included, therefore figures for the PCTs are not comparable with the all England totals.
5. Two tables have been provided for the PCTs owing to the reorganisation of the NHS in 2006 resulting in mainly new merged PCTs.

Hepatitis

Mr. Laxton: To ask the Secretary of State for Health what estimate he has made of prevalence of hepatitis B in each primary care trust; and if he will make a statement. [229590]

Dawn Primarolo: Estimates of hepatitis B prevalence at primary care trust level are not available. The Department estimates that about 0.3 per cent. of the United Kingdom population is chronically infected with hepatitis B virus (about 180,000 people).

Mr. Laxton: To ask the Secretary of State for Health whether he plans to commission research in the next 12 months on the anticipated incidence of all types of chronic hepatitis B over the next decade; and if he will make a statement. [229591]

Dawn Primarolo: The Medical Research Council funds a portfolio of basic and underpinning research relating to chronic hepatitis B, which may lead to further understanding of the condition. Research specifically related to the anticipated incidence of chronic hepatitis B over the next decade in this country is not currently being funded.

The Health Protection Agency gathers information on a sample proportion of persons in the United Kingdom infected with and affected by chronic viral hepatitis as part of its remit for monitoring infectious disease in this country. This information includes analysis of hepatitis B virus both for definition of the type and for evidence of drug resistance.

Mr. Laxton: To ask the Secretary of State for Health how many notifications there were for (a) hepatitis A, (b) chronic hepatitis B, (c) hepatitis C, (d) hepatitis
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D, (e) hepatitis E, (f) hepatitis F, (g) hepatitis G and (h) hepatitis H in each year since 2000; and if he will make a statement. [229592]

Dawn Primarolo: The information requested for hepatitis A, and acute and chronic hepatitis B and C is shown in the following table.

Statutory notifications of hepatitis A, B and C, annual totals, England and Wales; 2000 to 2007
Hepatitis A notifications Hepatitis B notifications Hepatitis C notifications

2000

1,271

1,035

1,042

2001

1,138

1,028

1,061

2002

1,381

1,073

1,340

2003

1,194

1,151

1,574

2004

784

1,215

1,851

2005

513

1,325

2,120

2006

433

1,165

2,194

2007

333

1,265

2,040

Notes:
1. Viral hepatitis is a notifiable disease. A registered medical practitioner attending a patient is under a statutory requirement to notify cases or suspected cases of viral hepatitis to the proper officer.
2. Data on hepatitis D are not collected. Hepatitis D is a defective virus that replicates only in the presence of the hepatitis B virus.
3. Notifications of hepatitis E are not recorded separately and are included under the category of other viral hepatitis.
4. Hepatitis F is a hypothetical hepatitis virus. Several hepatitis F virus candidates emerged in the 1990s. Further investigations failed to confirm the existence of the virus, and it was delisted as a cause of infectious hepatitis.
5. Data are not routinely collected on hepatitis G. Extensive worldwide investigation has failed to identify any association between the hepatitis G virus and hepatitis, and its clinical significance is unknown.
6. There is currently no virus designated as hepatitis H.
Source:
Health Protection Agency

Home Care Services

Greg Mulholland: To ask the Secretary of State for Health how many people seeking registration as domiciliary care providers in each region (a) met and (b) did not meet the required standard at each stage in the registration process in each of the last five years. [229243]

Phil Hope: We are informed by the Commission for Social Care Inspection (CSCI) that the information requested on how many applications for registration as domiciliary care agencies were successful at each stage of the process is not collected.

The following table shows the numbers of applications for registration which were approved and refused by CSCI or withdrawn by the applicant(s) in each of the last five years.

Service applications for domiciliary care agencies
Approved Refused Withdrawn

2004-05

739

5

45

2005-06

646

11

32

2006-07

510

4

37

2007-08

526

6

29

2008-09

214

4

18

Total

2,635

30

161


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Incontinence: Medical Equipment

Greg Mulholland: To ask the Secretary of State for Health how many (a) healthcare professionals, (b) primary care trust representatives, (c) strategic health authority representatives, (d) patients and (e) others responded to the June 2008 consultation on changes to Part IX of the Drug Tariff; and if he will make a statement. [230528]

Phil Hope: The Department received 85 formal responses to the June consultation entitled “Proposed new arrangements under Part IX of the Drug Tariff for the provision of stoma and urology appliances—and related services—in Primary Care. June 2008”. A breakdown is shown in the following table.

Respondent Number

Health care professionals

13

Primary care trust representatives

18

Strategic health authority representatives

0

Patients

16

Others

38

Total

85


Influenza: Vaccination

Sandra Gidley: To ask the Secretary of State for Health how many people received the influenza vaccination in each of the last five years, broken down by (a) age group and (b) primary care trust. [229566]

Dawn Primarolo: There are two age groups in the influenza vaccination programme; all people aged 65 years and over; those aged under 65 years in a clinical risk group.

This information is contained in the following documents which have been placed in the Library.

Data for the 2008-09 season will be available in the new year.

Mr. Crausby: To ask the Secretary of State for Health what recent representations he has received on reducing the age limit to 60 years for free influenza injections; and if he will make a statement. [229614]

Dawn Primarolo: I can confirm that the Department has received correspondence on this issue and these have been and continue to be responded to, but there have been no recent meetings.

The aim of the influenza immunisation policy is to reduce the serious morbidity and mortality due to influenza by immunising those people most likely to have a severe or complicated illness due to influenza.

The Joint Committee on Vaccination and Immunisation (JCVI) keeps the risk groups recommended influenza vaccination under regular review. This includes the review
27 Oct 2008 : Column 658W
of risk groups recommended influenza vaccination because of a clinical condition and also the review of the most appropriate age(s) at which to recommend influenza vaccination.

Learning Disability: Health Services

Mr. Jim Cunningham: To ask the Secretary of State for Health (1) what recent steps the Government have taken to improve the quality of care provided to patients with learning disabilities; [229878]

(2) what steps the Government plan to take to train NHS medical staff to improve services for patients with learning disabilities. [229879]

Phil Hope: “Promoting Equality” (2007), which has been placed in the Library, sets out the Department's action plan to improve access to and quality of health care for people with learning disabilities. Since then, we have taken a number of steps to improve the NHS's response for people with learning disabilities.

The NHS Operating Framework for 2008-09 (a copy of which has already been placed in the Library) challenges primary care trusts to take local action to improve the quality of national health service care and equality of access to care for people with learning disabilities. This includes developing and implementing personalised plans to address the health and care needs of people with learning disabilities. We have recently agreed new arrangements for general practitioner practices to provide annual health checks for people with learning disabilities known to local authorities. We have also launched a national awareness and education programme for the NHS about the Disability Equality Duty.

With regard to training for medical staff, the Department is currently considering how best to work with education commissioners and education providers to ensure that training for doctors and other health care professions addresses the needs of people with learning disabilities.

Our forthcoming strategy on learning disabilities will respond in full to the recommendations of the Independent Inquiry on Access to Healthcare for People with Learning Disabilities and will set out further steps to address these issues.


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