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3 Nov 2008 : Column 220W—continued


Driving Offences: Mobile Phones

Paul Holmes: To ask the Secretary of State for Justice how many prosecutions have been brought for offences related to the use of a mobile telephone whilst driving in each police force area in the latest year for which figures are available. [231407]

Maria Eagle: Available information on prosecutions in 2006 (latest available) taken from the Court Proceedings Database held by my Department, is provided in the table. Data for 2007 should be available at the end of November this year.

The majority of “use of hand held mobile phone while driving” offences are dealt with under the fixed penalty notices scheme. The table does not include fixed penalty notices but does include cases where fixed penalty notices were issued but not paid and subsequently referred to court.


3 Nov 2008 : Column 221W
Proceedings at magistrates courts for the offence of use of hand held mobile phone while driving( 1,2) by police force area, England and Wales, 2006
Police force area Total court proceedings( 2)

Avon and Somerset

54

Bedfordshire

76

Cambridgeshire

52

Cheshire

36

Cleveland

20

Cumbria

57

Derbyshire

35

Devon and Cornwall

52

Dorset

4

Durham

16

Essex

71

Gloucestershire

10

Greater Manchester

183

Hampshire

69

Hertfordshire

65

Humberside

45

Kent

(3)

Lancashire

62

Leicestershire

26

Lincolnshire

30

London, City of

24

Merseyside

46

Metropolitan Police

685

Norfolk

31

Northamptonshire

(3)

Northumbria

98

North Yorkshire

34

Nottinghamshire

17

South Yorkshire

43

Staffordshire

19

Suffolk

21

Surrey

92

Sussex

(3)

Thames Valley

211

Warwickshire

20

West Mercia

88

West Midlands

121

West Yorkshire

52

Wiltshire

38

Dyfed Powys

15

Gwent

6

North Wales

30

South Wales

28

England and Wales

2,682

(1) Offences under the Road Vehicles (Construction and Use) Regulations 1986, Regulations 110 (1), 110 (2) and 110 (3).
(2) May include cases where fixed penalty was originally issued but not paid and subsequently referred to court.
(3) Nil.
Note:
It is known that for some police force areas, the reporting of court proceedings in particular those relating to summary motoring offences, may be less than complete.

Electoral Commission: Powers of Entry

Mr. Tyrie: To ask the Secretary of State for Justice what powers of entry the Electoral Commission has; what powers it has to enter the homes of (a) election agents and (b) candidates in elections; and in what way powers of entry regarding these groups will change if the provisions of the Political Parties and Elections Bill are enacted. [232942]

Mr. Wills: The Commission has powers under section 146 (3) of the Political Parties, Elections and Referendums Act 2000 to enter premises and take copies of information relating to income and expenditure from a registered political party, a recognised third party and a permitted participant in a referendum. This power can be exercised by the Commission for the purposes of carrying out its functions. At present, the power to enter premises does not apply to election agents or candidates in elections (except candidates at a local election in Scotland). However, the Commission does currently have powers under section 146(1) to require the disclosure of documents relating to income and expenditure from election agents or candidates. It is a criminal offence under section 146(5) to fail to comply with such a requirement.


3 Nov 2008 : Column 222W

The Bill repeats the existing power to enter in clause 1(5) of Schedule 19A (to be inserted into the Political Parties, Elections and Referendums Act 2000 by Schedule 1 to the Bill). It also extends it to candidates (other candidates in Scottish local government elections), election agents, regulated donees (including MPs) and regulated participants. The result is that the original PPERA power for the Commission to enter premises for the purposes of carrying out its functions will now apply to election agents and candidates, alongside the other individuals and organisations listed in paragraph 1(1) in Schedule 19A.

In addition, the Political Parties and Elections Bill seeks to provide new powers for use by the Commission when it undertakes an investigation into a suspected breach of PPERA. To this end the Bill provides the Commission with new powers to request information, to put questions and to apply for a warrant to enable it to enter premises when carrying out an investigation into a suspected offence or other contravention of the 2000 Act. These powers are capable of applying to election agents and candidates who have such information in the same way that they may apply to anyone else. However, we have also introduced a number of important safeguards for the use of these new powers. In relation to entry of premises under this new power, the Commission will need to apply for a warrant under paragraph 3 of Schedule 19A. There is no automatic right of entry. For a warrant to be issued, the Commission must demonstrate on oath to a justice of the peace that it have reasonable grounds for believing that an offence has been committed (or other contravention of PPERA has occurred). They must also establish that documents are on the premises that were withheld following an earlier request or that are otherwise relevant to the investigation. When entering the premises, they must be accompanied at all times by a constable.

As I made clear in the Second Reading debate on the Bill, we have heard the force of opinion in the House on the issue of the Commission's powers and will consider what can be done to address it.

Judicial Pension Fund

Paul Rowen: To ask the Secretary of State for Justice how many judges will have received payments from the Judicial Pension Fund in 2008 by the end of the year. [231139]

Mr. Straw: Data on the number of members of the judicial pension scheme, including pensioners, are available in the published resource accounts. The figures published for 2006-07 show that there were 918 judicial pensioners. Copies of the accounts are held in the House of Commons Library.

National Offender Management Service: Per Capita Costs

Mrs. Gillan: To ask the Secretary of State for Justice what the estimated cost of each Director of Offender Management in the National Offender Management Service for 2009-10 is. [232631]


3 Nov 2008 : Column 223W

Mr. Malik: Following pilots in London and Wales, plans are now in place to appoint Directors of Offender Management (DOMs) who will be responsible for the delivery of prison and probation services in all the English regions and in Wales.

The posts will be at director level (senior civil servant pay band two) and all 10 DOM posts are expected to be filled by April 2009.

The pay scale for a senior civil servant (pay band 2) director starts at £81,600 up to a ceiling of £160,000 per annum.

Mrs. Gillan: To ask the Secretary of State for Justice what the cost has been of each regional offender manager in the National Offender Management Service since their inception in 2004. [232632]

Mr. Malik: The following table shows the resource expenditure recorded against each regional offender manager (in Wales, director of offender management) for 2005-06 to 2007-08. For 2004-05, figures are not separately identifiable. The costs include the regional offender managers, their immediate staff and non-pay costs. Accommodation costs are met centrally and not included. In 2006-07 some other programme costs (e.g. grants to service providers and private prison controllers) may be included and are not separately identifiable. Costs related to private sector prisons' controllers are not included in figures for 2005-06 and 2007-08.

Resource expenditure recorded against each r egional o ffender m anager (in Wales, d irector of o ffender m anagement) for 2005-06 to 2007-08
£
Regional offender m anagers/ d irectors of o ffender m anagement 2005-06 2006-07 2007-08

ROM North East

511,569

580,889

833,842

ROM North West

521,428

1,486,540

1,344,590

ROM Yorkshire and Humberside

461,711

1,405,300

792,241

ROM East Midlands

517,534

1,082,614

925,111

ROM West Midlands

484,690

1,135,070

933,041

ROM East of England

462,669

950,336

845,960

DOM Wales

475,853

691,959

1,087,512

ROM London

531,079

551,002

910,946

ROM South East

757,449

1,066,078

1,030,384

ROM South West

686,966

1,115,545

1,066,824

Total

5,410,948

10,065,333

9,770,449


Offenders: Deportation

Damian Green: To ask the Secretary of State for Justice how many foreign national prisoners were being held in prisons awaiting deportation after their due release date on 1 October 2008. [231575]

Mr. Hanson: No information is held centrally for 1 October as information is gathered weekly from prisons every Monday.

However, on 29 September 2008, 467 time served foreign national prisoners were being held in prison custody, and on 6 October, 436 were being held. These prisoners were being considered for either deportation or removal from the UK.


3 Nov 2008 : Column 224W

Offenders: Greater London

Mr. Randall: To ask the Secretary of State for Justice what estimate he has made of the number of persistent offenders there were in (a) the London borough of Hillingdon and (b) Uxbridge constituency in the latest period for which figures are available; and if he will make a statement. [231808]

Mr. Hanson: There are two statistical counts of persistent offenders used in the criminal justice system.

The first count is of persistent young offenders (PYOs). A PYO is a young person aged 10 to 17 who has been sentenced guilty of recordable offences on three or more separate occasions, and within three years of the last of these is arrested by the police for a further recordable offence.

During the three month period from April to June 2008, there were 7,389 criminal court cases across England and Wales in which PYOs were found guilty and sentenced. In the London metropolitan area there were 804 such cases. Of these, 17 were in the borough of Hillingdon. Counts of cases against offenders are not collected at any level lower than this borough.

Further information on PYOs can be found on the Ministry of Justice website:


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