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4 Nov 2008 : Column 330W—continued


Population data were published on the Ministry of Justice website on 31 October 2008 in line with standard practice:

This information is updated quarterly.

I refer the hon. Member to the answer he was given on 15 October 2008, Official Report, column 1235W.

These figures include prisoners held on remand or serving custodial sentences, as well as those held under the Immigration Act 1971 (including those in the immigration removal centres of Dover, Haslar and Lindholme).

In September’s data around 77 per cent. of prisoners for whom nationality is unrecorded are remand prisoners. Unrecorded nationalities account for 1 per cent. of the overall population.

These figures have been drawn from administrative IT systems, which, as with any large scale recording system, are subject to possible errors with data entry and processing.

Repossession Orders: Mortgages

Chris Huhne: To ask the Secretary of State for Justice how many (a) immediate and (b) suspended orders for possession have been made in mortgage repossession proceedings in each region in each of the last five years. [231556]

Bridget Prentice: The following table shows the numbers of outright and suspended orders made for mortgage possession in each region in England and Wales since 2003.

These figures do not indicate how many houses have been repossessed through the courts, since not all the orders will have resulted in the issue and execution of warrants of possession.


4 Nov 2008 : Column 331W

4 Nov 2008 : Column 332W
Number of mortgage( 1) possession orders( 2) made in HM Courts Service regions, and in England and Wales

2003 2004 2005 2006 2007 Total

Suspended orders

London

3,252

3,996

6,489

6,914

6,129

26,780

Midlands

4,705

5,222

7,174

8,585

8,968

34,654

North East

3,579

3,687

5,360

6,967

7,009

26,602

North West

4,003

3,805

5,043

6,714

7,179

26,744

South East

4,933

5,759

8,174

8,647

8,000

35,513

South West

2,305

2,593

3,750

4,114

3,757

16,519

Wales

1,729

1,527

2,156

2,700

2,991

11,103

England and Wales

24,506

26,589

38,146

44,641

44,033

177,915

Outright orders

London

2,742

3,792

6,621

8,298

7,945

29,398

Midlands

2,936

3,715

5,943

8,816

10,069

31,479

North East

2,427

2,549

4,279

6,643

8,043

23,941

North West

2,635

2,687

4,072

6,499

7,890

23,783

South East

3,268

4,291

7,046

9,046

9,824

33,475

South West

1,425

1,940

3,068

4,001

4,421

14,855

Wales

1,099

1,120

1,789

2,736

3,208

9,952

England and Wales

16,532

20,094

32,818

46,039

51,400

166,883

All orders

London

5,994

7,788

13,110

15,212

14,074

56,178

Midlands

7,641

8,937

13,117

17,401

19,037

66,133

North East

6,006

6,236

9,639

13,610

15,052

50,543

North West

6,638

6,492

9,115

13,213

15,069

50,527

South East

8,201

10,050

15,220

17,693

17,824

68,988

South West

3,730

4,533

6,818

8,115

8,178

31,374

Wales

2,828

2,647

3,945

5,436

6,199

21,055

England and Wales

41,038

46,683

70,964

90,680

95,433

344,798

(1 )Mortgage possession data include all types of lenders whether local authority or private.
(2 )The court, following a judicial hearing, may grant an order for possession immediately. This entitles the claimant to apply for a warrant to have the defendant evicted. However, even where a warrant for possession is issued, the parties can still negotiate a compromise to prevent eviction.
Notes:
1. Includes suspended orders and orders made.
2. Does not include the small number of possession actions entered in the High Court. Source:
Ministry of Justice

Shoplifting

Miss McIntosh: To ask the Secretary of State for Justice what plans he has to introduce restorative justice in relation to shoplifting offences. [231640]

Mr. Straw: Restorative justice can be used in relation to shoplifting offences. It is for local criminal justice boards and local criminal justice agencies to consider how best to use their funding to meet their targets and local needs. Restorative justice, for a variety of offences, is an established part of the work of youth offending teams and a number of areas have established schemes to deliver adult restorative justice. Where a scheme is available, its use in relation to a given case should depend on whether the victim chooses to participate and, where appropriate, the sentence of the court.

Young Offender Institutions

Mr. Malins: To ask the Secretary of State for Justice how many hours per day were spent by inmates (a) in cell and (b) out of cell in each young offender institution in the latest period for which figures are available. [232186]

Mr. Hanson: The National Offender Management Service does not record the time prisoners spend in or out of their cells but does measure the time cells are unlocked. The following table shows the average time unlocked per prisoner per weekday, in all young offenders institutions across England and Wales between April and September 2008. Data are provisional and subject to validation.

Average time unlocked per prisoner per weekday
Prison Average time unlocked per prisoner per weekday

Ashfield

9.7

Aylesbury

7.0

Brinsford

(1)

Castington

8.8

Cookham Wood

18.6

Deerbolt

7.0

Feltham

9.5

Glen Parva

8.3

Hindley

9.2

Huntercombe

6.6

Lancaster Farms

7.8

Northallerton

7.6

Portland

7.9

Reading

7.5

Rochester

7.6

Stoke Heath

8.5

Swinfen Hall

7.8

Thorn Cross

12.5

Warren Hill

9.7

Wellington

10.1

Wetherby

10.7

(1) Data not available

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