Previous Section Index Home Page

5 Nov 2008 : Column 469W—continued


Table B: Proceedings and average fines imposed at magistrates courts for the offence of driving without a licence( 1) , England and Wales 1997-2006

Total proceedings Average fine (£)

1997

217,490

65

1998

225,324

59

1999

236,188

58

2000

254,077

61

2001

259,742

61

2002

277,107

64

2003

305,339

66

2004

311,006

68

2005

272,954

69

2006

230,647

71

(1.) Offence under the Road Traffic Act 1988 s. 87 (1) and (2) as amended.
Notes:
1. It is known that for some police force areas, the reporting of court proceedings in particular those relating to summary motoring offences is less than complete.
2. Every effort is made to ensure that the figures presented are accurate and complete. However, it is important to note that these data have been extracted from large administrative data systems generated by the courts and police forces. As a consequence, care should be taken to ensure data collection processes and their inevitable limitations are taken into account when those data are used.

Railways

Mr. Stephen O'Brien: To ask the Secretary of State for Transport what progress has been made towards increasing rail use by 50 per cent. by 2010 as referred to in his Department’s Transport Ten Year Plan of 2000; what the baseline year is against which this target is being measured; and how many passenger kilometres were travelled in each year since 2000. [232007]

Paul Clark: As shown in the following table, rail passenger kilometres have grown by 28 per cent. since 2000-01, the base year for forecasting used in the 10-year plan.


5 Nov 2008 : Column 470W
Great Britain 2000-01 to 2007-08

Passenger kilometres (billions)

2000-01

38.2

2001-02

39.1

2002-03

39.7

2003-04

40.9

2004-05

41.8

2005-06

43.2

2006-07

46.2

2007-08

49.0

Growth between 2000-01 and 2007-08 (percentage)

28

Source:
ORR

Railways: Overcrowding

Norman Baker: To ask the Secretary of State for Transport what criteria his Department relied upon when the decision was made to redefine to 10 people standing for every 100 seats what constitutes overcrowding on the railways. [229953]

Paul Clark [holding answer 27 October 2008]: No decision was made to redefine the Department for Transport’s planning criteria for train crowding. It remains unchanged from the earlier Strategic Rail Authority national criteria for crowding which, with the exception of CENTRO services before 2007, has been in place nationally since 2002.

The previous Centra standard was based on traditional compartment-style slam door trains with no designed standing space for passengers. These trains have now been replaced with modern sliding door trains.

Roads: Repairs and Maintenance

Mr. Stephen O'Brien: To ask the Secretary of State for Transport what progress has been made towards achieving the target of widening 5 per cent. of the strategic road network by 2010, as stated in the Transport 10 Year Plan of 2000 issued by his Department’s predecessor; against what baseline this target is measured; and what percentage of the strategic road network was widened in each year since 2000. [232014]

Paul Clark: The 10-year plan published in July 2000 set out a broad package of measures for improving transport. Over the 10-year period, individual projects in the Highways Agency’s programme would flow from the outcome of multi modal studies and decisions taken through regional transport strategies. Although the plan gave an indicative figure for widening the strategic road network, this is not a target that the Government monitors performance against.

The following table provides detail of the schemes widened from 2000 to 2007 (the last full year for which data is available).


5 Nov 2008 : Column 471W
Year opened to traffic Scheme Total scheme length ( k ilometres)

2000

A30/A35 Honiton-Exeter (DBFO)

21.0

M66 Denton-Middleton (Contract 1)

6.0

M66 Denton-Middleton (Contract 3)

9.0

2001

No widening schemes completed

0

2002

No widening schemes completed

0

2003

A2/M2 Cobham to Junction 4 widening

10.6

A11 Roudham Heath-Attleborough Improvement

9.9

A1 Willowburn-Denwick Improvement

4.0

A46 Newark-Lincoln Improvement

13.0

A1033 Hedon Road Improvement

6.7

2004

A120 Stansted to Braintree Improvement

23.0

A2 Bean-Cobham Phase 1 Bean-Pepperhill

4.1

2005

A1(M) Wetherby-Walshford

5.0

M5 Junctions 17-18a Northbound Climbing Lane (Hallen Hill)

2.1

M4 Junction 18 Eastbound Diverge

3.0

M25 J12-15 Widening

11.4

2006

A1(M) Ferrybridge-Hook Moor

17.0

M60 J5-8 Widening

7.4

M5 Junctions 19-20 Southbound Climbing Lane (Naish Hill)

3.4

M5 Junctions 19-20 Northbound Climbing Lane (Tickenham Hill)

3.4

A249 Iwade-Queenborough Improvement (DBFO)

5.0

2007

A11 Attleborough Bypass

5.2

A428 Caxton Common to Hardwick Improvement

7.6

A30 Bodmin Indian Queens Improvement

11.5

A66 Carkin Moor to Scotch Corner Improvement

6.1

A66 Greta Bridge to Stephen Bank Improvement

4.7

M1 J31 to J32 Widening

2.0


5 Nov 2008 : Column 472W

Safety Belts

Norman Baker: To ask the Secretary of State for Transport what percentage of car occupants killed in road deaths were in the (a) front and (b) rear seats (i) wearing and (ii) not wearing seatbelts in the most recent year for which figures are available. [232712]

Jim Fitzpatrick [holding answer 3 November 2008]: In 2007, there were a total of 1,432 car occupant fatalities in reported personal injury road accidents. Of these, 1,256 (88 per cent.) were front seat occupants and 175 (12 per cent.) were rear seat occupants.

Research reported in the published ‘Second Review of the Government's Road Safety Strategy’ and ‘Road Safety Research Report No. 76: Trends in Fatal Car-occupant Accidents’, both published on 26 February 2007, estimates that about a third (34 per cent.) of fatally injured car occupants were not wearing their seatbelts. A further 50 per cent. of cases involved a fatality wearing a seatbelt and in 16 per cent. of cases seat belt use was either unknown/unrecorded or non applicable.

85 per cent. of fatalities not wearing a seat belt were driving or travelling in the front passenger seat; fatalities were not wearing seat belts in 58 per cent. of accidents involving a rear seat death.

The Department has just launched its latest seatbelt campaign.

Trade Unions

Mr. Hoban: To ask the Secretary of State for Transport how many civil servants in his Department were seconded to work for (a) trades unions and (b) the Trades Union Congress in each year since 2003. [229103]

Mr. Hoon: The central Department and its agencies have seconded no employees to (a) trade unions or to the (b) Trades Union Congress since 2003.

Transport: Finance

Mr. Stephen O'Brien: To ask the Secretary of State for Transport what projections his Department has made of the level of (a) private investment in and (b) public spending on (i) the railways, (ii) roads and (iii) other forms of transport infrastructure between 2009 and 2014. [232032]

Paul Clark: The long-term funding guideline (LTFG) for transport, announced as part of the outcome of the comprehensive spending review in October 2007, sets out indicative plans for total spending within the Department for Transport’s departmental expenditure limit of some £73 billion over the five years from 2009-10 to 2013-14. Of this total, some £19 billion is expected to be spent on railways (including DfT’s grant contributions towards the costs of Crossrail). £19 billion is expected to be spent on roads, along with a significant proportion of a further £4 billion identified as capital funding within ‘regional funding allocations’ (RFAs). The balance of the RFAs, plus the remaining £31 billion of the LTFG is planned to be spent on other transport services and infrastructure.


5 Nov 2008 : Column 473W

These figures do not include spending by Transport for London funded through its use of farebox revenues or Prudential Borrowing. The figures also exclude other local authority revenue funded through general grant (paid by CLG) and council tax, and any investment funded through Prudential Borrowing.

The DfT has made no comprehensive projections of levels of private investment in transport infrastructure.

Waterloo Station

Norman Baker: To ask the Secretary of State for Transport pursuant to the answer of 4 June 2008 to my hon. Friend the Member for Kingston and Surbiton (Mr. Davey), Official Report, column 946W, on Waterloo station, whether the train operating company operating longer trains will be required to pay proportionately greater track access charges to Network Rail. [232714]

Paul Clark [holding answer 3 November 2008]: Train operating companies operating longer trains will be required to pay proportionately greater track access charges to Network Rail. This is due to the track access agreement variable charges being calculated by vehicle mileage.

Northern Ireland

Departmental Older Workers

David Simpson: To ask the Secretary of State for Northern Ireland how many people aged over (a) 55 and (b) 60 years were recruited by his Department in 2007-08; and what percentage in each case this was of the number of new recruits. [228748]

Mr. Woodward: None of those people recruited to the Northern Ireland Office in 2007-08 has been over 55 years of age.

Until recently, age requirements for appointment to the civil service were that appointees should have reached the age of 16 on or before 1 July prior to the date of appointment, and be less than 65 years of age at the date of appointment. This policy has recently been reviewed and, with effect from 1 September 2008, there is no longer an upper age limit for appointees.


Next Section Index Home Page