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6 Nov 2008 : Column 635W—continued

Officials have also undertaken a major programme of consultation over the summer and have met representatives from many partnerships and partner organisations in order to update our understanding of the needs of CDRP/CSPs, including hearing about what more can
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be done to help them be effective. Our findings will inform a national support framework for partnerships. The framework will take account of the impact of the changes brought in through the minimum standards and seeks to understand the gaps in capacity and capability setting out what we will do to continue to support partnerships.

The Home Office’s Police and Partnership Standards Unit has also undertaken confidential un-graded assessments of around 30 CDRPs/CSPs over the last two and half years at the invitation of partnerships. They were assessed against their compliance with the six hallmarks contained within the Home Office publication “Delivering Safer Communities: A guide to effective partnership working, published in 2007.”

Government offices provide a link between CDRPs/CSPs and central Government. They work closely with partnerships to offer support and guidance on meeting their objectives.

Crimes of Violence

James Brokenshire: To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department how many people in each police force area have (a) been issued with a direction to leave under section 27 of the Violent Crime Reduction Act 2006 and (b) been arrested following a failure to comply with such direction since the introduction of the legislation. [222649]

Mr. Alan Campbell: The information requested on the number of directions to leave issued by the police, and arrests for failing to comply with the direction to leave is not collected centrally.

The arrests collection held by the Home Office covers arrests for recorded crime (notifiable offences) only, broken down at a main offence group level, covering categories such as violence against the person and robbery.

Offences of failing to comply with directions to leave under section 27 of the Violent Crime Reduction Act 2006 are not notifiable offences and do not form part of the arrests collection.

Criminal Records Bureau: Standards

Mr. Vara: To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department pursuant to the answer of 16 October 2008, Official Report, column 1432W, on the Criminal Records Bureau: standards, how many of the disputes resulted in the applicant's complaint being upheld and the record amended in each year. [229252]

Meg Hillier: The total number of disclosures where the details released by the Criminal Records Bureau (CRB) were disputed by the applicant and subsequently upheld is detailed in the following table.

Total number of upheld disputes Total number of disclosures issued

2003-04

1,739

2,284,688

2004-05

2,265

2,430,937

2005-06

2,669

2,770,265

2006-07

2,797

3,277,957

2007-08

2,785

3,323,251


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The CRB enhanced its recording of disputes during 2005-06. Prior to this, the CRB did not hold figures for disputes not upheld.

Information released on a disclosure can be disputed for a number of reasons including the inclusion of locally held non-conviction information which the applicant believes to be inaccurate or misleading; situations where an applicant has had their identity stolen; or the inclusion of data which an applicant was unaware would appear on the disclosure.

Departmental Internet

Damian Green: To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department how many of the (a) absolute unique and (b) total visitors to her Department’s mylifemyid website have been from computers in her Department and its agencies. [226064]

Meg Hillier: It is not possible to provide the information requested as the web analytics package that is used for mylifemyid (Google Analytics) does not provide the IP addresses of people visiting the website.

Genetics: Databases

Keith Vaz: To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department (1) how many people had a DNA sample removed from the national DNA database in (a) 2007 and (b) 1997; [229177]

(2) how many and what percentage of people who requested the removal of their sample from the national DNA database in (a) 2007 and (b) 1997 subsequently had it removed. [229178]

Mr. Alan Campbell: In relation to the number of records removed from the national DNA database each year, I refer my right hon. Friend to the answer given to the hon. Member for Cardiff, Central (Jenny Willott) on 6 October 2008, Official Report, columns 136-38W.

In relation to the number of people who have requested the removal of their record from the national DNA database, I refer my right hon. Friend to the answer given to my hon. Friend the Member for Pendle (Mr. Prentice) on 2 July 2008, Official Report, columns 909-10W.

Paul Holmes: To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department how many individuals (a) under 13 and (b) between (i) 13 and 15, (ii) 16 and 18 and (iii) 19 and 21 years of age have had their DNA profiles placed on the national DNA database. [231369]

Mr. Alan Campbell: The number of profiles added to the national DNA database by English and Welsh forces, broken down by the age ranges in the question, is given in the following table. This shows age at the time the DNA sample was taken, not the person’s current age. The position as at 30 September 2008 is shown.

As it is possible for a person’s profile to be loaded on to the NDNAD on more than one occasion, some profiles held on the NDNAD are replicates. This can occur, for example, if the person provided different names, or different versions of their name, on separate arrests, or because profiles are upgraded. Therefore, the number of individuals on the NDNAD is the number
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of subject profiles reduced by the replication rate. At present, the replication rate is estimated to be 13.3 per cent. The table shows both the number of profiles and the estimated number of individuals.

Age on load Total subject profiles Estimated individuals

Under 13

113,053

98,017

13-15

510,236

442,375

16-18

699,075

606,098

19-21

604,527

524,125


Human Trafficking: Children

James Brokenshire: To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department how many trafficked children have been identified following police raids on illegal cannabis factories in each of the last five years. [232892]

Mr. Alan Campbell: No central records are kept on juvenile offenders who may have been victims of trafficking. It is not therefore possible to give a reliable figure. However, I am aware that concerns have been raised by a number of children's charities about the arrest of children found in cannabis factories in the UK.

Guidance was issued in 2007 by the Association of Chief Police Officers (ACPO) lead on child trafficking to all chief constables requesting that children found working in cannabis factories and other such illegal and criminal activity should be properly screened to identify whether they are child victims of trafficking.

Crown Prosecution Service (CPS) guidance to crown prosecutors advises that where children are known to have been trafficked and coerced to commit criminal acts, cases should be discontinued on evidential grounds. Where the information concerning coercion is less certain, further details should be sought from the police and youth offender teams so that the public interest in continuing a prosecution can be considered carefully.

Human Trafficking: Hertfordshire

Mike Penning: To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department how many residents of Hertfordshire were (a) arrested, (b) prosecuted and (c) convicted for crimes relating to human trafficking in each of the last five years. [231908]

Mr. Alan Campbell: To date of the seven arrests and prosecutions resulting from activity related to these offences by Hertfordshire Constabulary there have been no convictions.

Identity Cards

Mr. Heald: To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department how many letters of (a) support and (b) opposition she has received on the subject of the identity card scheme in the last 12 months. [230595]

Meg Hillier: Correspondence received regarding the national identity scheme is not recorded as being in support of or in opposition to identity cards.

The volume of correspondence on the national identity scheme is recorded each month. The detail of the
6 Nov 2008 : Column 639W
correspondence received is recorded by theme. The list of themes is not exhaustive and can be added to as required. One letter can generate multiple themes.

From October 2007 to September 2008, the number one theme every month, accounting for by far the most common subject matter, has been "Wants an ID Card". Other themes which regularly feature in the top 10 themes each month are "Cost" (of the scheme and to individuals), "Civil Liberties" and "General Information".

Identity Cards: Airports

Damian Green: To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department from what point in an airport (a) airline pilots and crew who are foreign nationals and (b) airside airport workers who are UK nationals will be required to carry an identity card. [226014]

Meg Hillier [holding answer 14 October 2008]: There will be no requirement to carry an identity card, in fact the Identity Cards Act specifically precludes the requirement to carry a card.

Identity Cards: Finance

Lynne Jones: To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department pursuant to the answer of 1 September 2008, Official Report, column 1568W, on identity cards: finance, whether the costs of registering individuals' fingerprint biometrics are being attributed to the common costs of both passport and identity registration; and what the evidential basis is for the statement of 19 December 2006, Official Report, column 139WS, that around 70 per cent. of the scheme's costs are required to keep UK passports up to international standards. [224276]

Meg Hillier [holding answer 12 September 2008]: The figure of 70 per cent. has since been recalculated to reflect the updated rollout plans announced in the National Identity Scheme Delivery Plan published on 6 March 2008.

The latest six monthly Identity Cards Scheme Cost Report, published on 6 May 2008, sets out those elements of the cost estimates that relate specifically to passports, those specific to identity cards and those that are common to both.

The cost of registering individuals for passports and identity cards is included in common costs because the same technology infrastructure and business processes will be used. In many cases, the same application will result in the issue of both a passport and an identity card.

The latest Cost Report may be found at:

I would refer the hon. Member to that report.

Identity Cards: Young People

Damian Green: To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department how much her Department and the Identity and Passport Service paid Ipsos MORI for the research, compilation and publication of Identity and Passport Service, Proof of Age Research. [226063]


6 Nov 2008 : Column 640W

Meg Hillier: The amount paid to Ipsos MORI to conduct the Proof of Age research was £79,778 (excluding VAT).

Mr. Heald: To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department how many comments were received from the mylifemyid.org consultation website; how many were (a) positive and (b) negative; and if she will make a statement. [230596]

Meg Hillier: The mylifemyid.org website was set up as a research community and not as a consultation website. Members were asked specific research questions, and the responses are still being analysed. The results of the research will be published in due course.

Lancashire Constabulary: Recruitment

Mr. Gordon Prentice: To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department how many applicants to join Lancashire Constabulary as a police officer were rejected in each year since 2004; whether unsuccessful applicants are given reasons for their rejection on request; and if she will make a statement. [230087]

Mr. Coaker: Chief police officers are responsible for recruitment to their forces. They operate within a set of nationally agreed standards. Information provided by Lancashire police on the number of applications rejected from 2007 is shown in the following table; there is no information available for the number of applications rejected prior to 2007. Chief officers are not required to give reasons for rejecting applications although in most circumstances, candidates will be informed of the reasons for their rejection.

Lancashire police , n umber of rejected applications to become a police officer, 2007 to 31 October 2008
Recruitment period Applications rejected

January 2007

820

April 2007

673

September 2007

702

February 2008

(1)698

August 2008

(1)548

(1 )February and August applications are still under consideration and figures reflect rejected applications to date.

Offences Against Children: Internet

Margaret Moran: To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department how many investigations of suspected terrorism offences leading to arrests have revealed the use of online images of child abuse to convey information; and if she will make a statement. [230272]

Mr. Coaker: This is an operational matter for the Metropolitan Police Counter Terrorism Command.


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