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Michael Gove: To ask the Secretary of State for Children, Schools and Families how many initial teacher training providers over-recruited for (a) mathematics, (b) science, (c) other secondary priority subjects, (d) non-priority secondary subjects and (e) primary teacher training places in each of the last five years; and what the level of over-recruitment was in each case. [233515]

Jim Knight: The requested information is given in the following table.

These figures exclude employment based routes initial teacher training (EBITT) courses. Prior to 2008-09 the Department did not set targets for EBITT, although recruitment data for EBITT courses was still taken into account in projecting the future required numbers of recruits and successful completers on each type of programme and by subject to assist in determining the targets required for mainstream ITT targets.


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12 Nov 2008 : Column 1280W
Mainstream initial teacher training (ITT): Places and recruitment by ITT specialism 2003-04 to 2007-08: England
Mainstream providers where recruitment exceeds allocation by one or more place
All Mainstream ITT Providers Total over-recruitment

Total number of mainstream providers offering the course Mainstream providers where recruitment exceeds allocation by one or more place Number of allocated places Number recruited to TT courses Number of places exceeding allocation Average number of places in each provider exceeding allocation

(a) Mathematics

2003-04

74

15

410

460

50

*

2004-05

78

9

260

290

20

*

2005-06

82

11

290

320

30

*

2006-07

82

12

330

360

30

*

2007-08

84

6

230

280

50

10

(b) Science

2003-04

77

15

750

820

70

*

2004-05

80

13

530

580

50

*

2005-06

83

12

460

490

40

*

2006-07

84

18

770

830

60

*

2007-08

84

15

760

830

80

10

(c) Other secondary priority subjects

2003-04

88

13

2,650

2,790

150

10

2004-05

91

9

1,810

1,880

60

10

2005-06

93

5

640

690

50

10

2006-07

97

7

1,550

1,600

50

10

2007-08

97

9

1,030

1,080

60

10

(d) Non-priority secondary subjects

2003-04

85

19

2,020

2,130

100

10

2004-05

88

25

2,330

2,490

160

10

2005-06

91

31

2,730

2,910

180

10

2006-07

83

38

2,330

2,540

210

10

2007-08

83

44

2,270

2,520

250

10

(e) Primary

2003-04

85

48

11,350

11,840

490

10

2004-05

90

34

9,250

9,670

410

10

2005-06

88

46

11,390

11,950

560

10

2006-07

89

38

9,410

9,750

340

10

2007-08

88

43

9,570

9,970

400

10

* less than 5.
Notes:
1. Mainstream includes universities and other higher education institutions, SCITT and OU, but excludes employment based routes.
2. Other secondary priority subjects includes: English; Maths; Science; ICT; Design and Technology; Technology; Modern Languages; Music (from September 2006); Religious Education (from September 2006) and Business Studies. Note that Business Studies is not a priority subject but is included here because the departmental target for Technology includes Design and Technology, ICT and Business Studies and cannot be split into the component parts.
3. Non-priority secondary subjects includes: Geography, History; Art; Design; physical Education; applied Science; Applied ICT; Manufacturing; Engineering; health and Social Care; Applied Business; Leisure and Tourism; Vocational—Recreation, Sport and Leisure Studies; Applied Art and Design; Music (up to September 2006) and Religious Education (up to September 2006). Excludes Business Studies—see note 2.
4. Allocation and recruitment numbers have been rounded to the nearest 10.

Targets set by the Department are at sector (not provider) level. Providers recruit to an allocation based on a bidding process. Providers are encouraged to set aspirational and challenging targets. The sum of the allocation targets may not be the same as sector level departmental targets.

Mr. Gibb: To ask the Secretary of State for Children, Schools and Families how many and what percentage of newly-qualified teachers acquired qualified teacher status through training on the graduate teacher programme in each year since 2005. [234381]

Jim Knight: The following table shows the number and percentage of trainees who successfully completed the graduate teacher programme in each year from 2004-05 to 2006-07, the most recent year for which data are available.


12 Nov 2008 : Column 1281W
Teachers gaining qualified teacher status: Qualification via the graduate teacher programme 2004-05 to 2006-07, England
O f which : trainees successfully completing the Graduate Teacher Programme

Number of teachers gaining qualified teacher status Number Percentage

2004-05

33,750

5,090

15.1

2005-06

33,100

4,600

13.9

2006-07

34,090

5,140

15.1

Notes:
1. Percentages are based on the total number of teachers gaining qualified teacher status in that year. This includes universities and other higher education institutions, SCITT and Open University as well as employment based routes and cases where QTS is granted on assessment-based training.
2. Numbers have been rounded to the nearest 10.
Source:
TDA Performance Profiles

Mr. Laws: To ask the Secretary of State for Children, Schools and Families how many and what proportion of students following a primary teaching postgraduate mainstream course receive a £4,000 bursary; and if he will make a statement. [234753]

Jim Knight: Training bursaries are payable to eligible trainees on mainstream postgraduate courses of initial teacher training. In 2007-08 there were 8,640 first year postgraduates on mainstream primary courses eligible for the primary bursary.

In principle, almost all trainees are eligible for a training bursary. To be eligible for a training bursary, a
12 Nov 2008 : Column 1282W
trainee must be a home or EU trainee on a TDA funded course and be eligible for student support. The full eligibility criteria for a bursary are set out in the Initial Teacher Training (ITT) Funding manual, available at:


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