Previous Section Index Home Page

17 Nov 2008 : Column 51W—continued


Essex Police Authority: Pay

Mr. Amess: To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department how much each official employed by Essex Police Authority has received in bonuses in each of the last three financial years; and what the grade of each official was. [233916]

Mr. Coaker: This information is not held centrally.

Mr. Amess: To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department what criteria are used to determine whether staff employed by Essex Police Authority receive a bonus; and if she will make a statement. [233917]

Mr. Coaker: This information is not held centrally.

Fixed Penalties: Cycling

Mr. Andrew Smith: To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department how many fixed penalty notices were issued for offences committed on pedal cycles in each of the last three years, broken down by police force area. [236188]

Mr. Alan Campbell: The information requested is not collected centrally.

Fixed Penalties: Proof of Identity

Mr. Frank Field: To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department how many people who received a fixed penalty notice in the last three years were later found to have given (a) a false address and (b) an incorrect address to the relevant authorities. [236066]


17 Nov 2008 : Column 52W

Mr. Alan Campbell: The information requested is not collected centrally.

Greater Manchester Police: Labour Turnover

Mr. Crausby: To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department how many police officers (a) were recruited to and (b) left Greater Manchester Police in each year since 2001. [234102]

Mr. Coaker: The available data are given in the following table.

Police officer recruits( 1) and leavers( 2) for Greater Manchester Police (FTE)( 3) from 2002-03 to 2007-08( 4)

Joiners Leavers

2002-03

113

106(5)

2003-04

978

279

2004-05

233

316

2005-06

277

421

2006-07

362

403

2007-08

426

381

(1) This and other tables contain full-time equivalent figures that have been rounded to the nearest whole number. Because of rounding, there may be an apparent discrepancy between totals and the sums of the constituent items.
(2) Includes normal retirements, medical retirements, resignations, dismissals and death but not transfers to other England and Wales forces and officers leaving after a period of secondment.
(3) Full Time Equivalent figures that have been rounded to the nearest whole number. Because of rounding, there may be an apparent discrepancy between totals and the sums of the constituent items.
(4) Financial year runs 1 April to 31 March inclusive. Data are not available prior to 2002-03.
(5) Excludes quarter one, data not available.

Identity Cards: Biometrics

Lynne Jones: To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department what estimate she has made of the number of records against which each biometric taken for the purpose of enrolment in the identity card scheme will need to be checked when the scheme is fully rolled out. [219762]

Meg Hillier: It is our intention to conduct checks on individual biometrics when people enrol, against those of other people who have previously enrolled.

The number of people eventually enrolled in the scheme will depend on the take up of identity cards, but the Identity and Passport Service currently holds some 43 million active passport records.

Lynne Jones: To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department whether the process of verification of an individual’s biometric identifiers for the identity card scheme will check the biometric against a local copy held on the card or against the biometric stored on the National Identity Register. [219764]

Meg Hillier: Verification checks of biometrics identifiers will be made against the card in most cases using the biometrics stored in the chip, for example if the facial image or fingerprint biometrics are verified as part of an immigration check at the border. Only in specific circumstances, for example if an ID card has been lost, would verification of identity take place against the biometrics held on the National Identity Register. Such checks will provide a very secure and reliable means of proving identity.


17 Nov 2008 : Column 53W

Lynne Jones: To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department what estimate she has made of the number of false matches likely if fingerprint biometrics alone are used for the biometric verification for the identity card scheme after the enrolment of (a) one million, (b) six million, (c) 40 million and (d) 60 million individuals. [219765]

Meg Hillier: The Identity and Passport Service is still in the process of procurement of specific biometric systems, hence we are unable to give an estimate of false matches that may occur. In the event of an uncertain fingerprint match the scheme will make use of human fingerprint experts to resolve uncertain fingerprint matches from the automated fingerprint matching system.

This procedure is used in all large-scale fingerprint systems to control false matches and the process will apply irrespective of the size of the database.

Lynne Jones: To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department what response she has made to the views expressed in the annual report for 2007 from the Biometrics Assurance Group on exception handling and fingerprint biometrics of the over 75 year olds for the purposes of the identity card scheme. [224278]

Meg Hillier [holding answer 12 September 2008]: Responses were only made to the specific recommendations of the Biometrics Assurance Group and as no specific recommendation was made regarding exception handling or the collection of fingerprint biometrics for the elderly, no comment was made.

Independent Police Complaints Commission

Mr. Amess: To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department (1) what recommendations of the Independent Police Complaints Commission have not been implemented in each of the last five years; what the reason was in each case; and if she will make a statement; [233899]

(2) what the Independent Police Complaints Commission's (IPCCs) target is for conclusion of investigation of a complaint against the police from the date of registration of the complaint; what the average time taken per case has been since the IPCC was set; and if she will make a statement. [233910]

Mr. Coaker: The Home Office does not hold the information requested. This is a matter for the Independent Police Complaints Commission.

Independent Police Complaints Commission: Finance

Mr. Amess: To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department what funding her Department provided to the Independent Police Complaints Commission (IPCC) in each of the last three years; what recent discussions she has had with the IPCC about future funding; and if she will make a statement. [233909]

Mr. Coaker: The Home Office has provided the following amounts towards the funding of the Independent Police Complaints Commission in the last three years:


17 Nov 2008 : Column 54W

Amounts provided towards funding (£ million)

2006-07

31.2

2007-08

32.2

2008-09

34.2


We continue to work closely with the IPCC to ensure that they are sufficiently funded both now and in the future to achieve their objectives while ensuring value for money and appropriate efficiency and effectiveness.

Police National Missing Person Bureau

Mr. Ruffley: To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department what recent assessment she has made of the effectiveness of the operation of the Police National Missing Person Bureau; and if she will make a statement. [234476]

Mr. Coaker: The National Policing Improvement Agency's (NPIA) Missing Persons Bureau has been developing its services to police forces, partners and stakeholders. This includes examining the protocols for the capture, storage and matching of DNA in missing persons' cases, and work with the Department for Children, Schools and Families (DCSF) on their Action Plan on Young Runaways, launched in June 2008. The Bureau has a change programme with over 40 enhancements designed to develop its response to missing person investigations.

A new national child rescue alert system is being developed and will enable the Bureau to launch United Kingdom-wide alerts and to participate in launching cross-border alerts with other European Union (EU) member states.

The Bureau is involved in an EU-sponsored (Justice and Home Affairs Council) joint Anglo-French alert exercise to determine if a national scheme is viable for the United Kingdom and test a hypothesis of how such a scheme might work.

The Bureau is currently liaising with the National Centre for Missing and Exploited Children (USA) and with four EU member states in this development programme.

A review is currently being carried out of the state of 'unidentified body' cases within forces and encouraging forensic reviews. Work is also being done to establish an effective DNA strategy for missing persons' enquiries and the Bureau is developing its IT system (Hermes) to enable automatic and electronic transfer of data from police forces to the Bureau and onwards to the charity Missing People.

One of the key future priorities for the Bureau is the development of a code of practice to create a national ‘picture' of missing people. A code will generate accurate and timely data to enable the new national indicator on runaways as part of the National Indicator Set for 2009-2010. This indicator (NI71) is designed to secure effective joint working between children's services, the police and other local partners to ensure that necessary data about young runaways is collected, analysed and used to assist in safeguarding children. This code of practice has been drafted and consultation ends on November 21.


17 Nov 2008 : Column 55W

A co-hosted event with the charity Missing People will be held in April 2009 to raise awareness and to share best practice.

Police Patrolling

Paul Holmes: To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department how many hours were spent on patrol by police officers in each police force area in each year since 1997. [234106]

Mr. Coaker: It is not possible to answer this question except at disproportionate cost.

Police: Bureaucracy

Paul Holmes: To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department how many hours were spent on paperwork or administrative duties by police officers in each police force area in each year since 1997. [234107]

Mr. Coaker: The information requested could be provided only at disproportionate cost.

Police: Complaints

Mr. Amess: To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department in what courts completed proceedings against police officers from Essex have taken place in each year since 1997. [233915]

Mr. Coaker: I have been informed by the Office for Criminal Justice Reform that the data held centrally on court proceedings do not contain information about the circumstances behind each case, beyond the description provided in the statute under which prosecutions are brought.

It is therefore not possible to identify the occupation of a defendant who has been prosecuted or convicted of a criminal offence. As a result the information requested on court proceedings is not available.

Sir John Stanley: To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department what publications have been made available to the general public setting out the statutory police complaint procedure; by whom these publications have been published; and if she will place copies of each publication in the Library. [234974]

Mr. Coaker [holding answer 13 November 2008]: The Independent Police Complaints Commission (IPCC), which has a guardianship role for the police complaints system under the Police Reform Act 2002, sets out on its website details of the complaints and appeals procedures at:

It also produces advice in hard copy and I am arranging for copies to be placed in the Library of the House.

Mr. Amess: To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department (1) how many complaints have been referred to the Independent Police Complaints Commission (IPCC) in (a) England and (b) Essex since the IPCC was established, broken down by police force; and how many have been upheld in each case; [233911]


17 Nov 2008 : Column 56W

(2) what complaints to the Independent Police Complaints Commission (IPCC) have been upheld since the establishment of the IPCC; what steps were taken in each case by the relevant police force to implement the relevant recommendations; and if she will make a statement; [233912]

(3) how many complaints have been made against police officers in (a) Southend and (b) Essex in each year since 1997; and what action has been taken against each of the officers concerned when complaints have been upheld. [233914]

Mr. Coaker: The Home Office does not hold the information requested. This is a matter for the Independent Police Complaints Commission.

Police: Crime

Mr. Amess: To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department how many serving police officers have been (a) prosecuted and (b) convicted of a criminal offence in each month since June 2007, broken down by (i) sex, (ii) age and (iii) police force; and how many of those convicted were (A) suspended from duty, (B) demoted, (C) dismissed and (D) cautioned. [233900]

Mr. Coaker: I have been informed by the Office for Criminal Justice Reform that the data held centrally on court proceedings do not contain information about the circumstances behind each case, beyond the description provided in the statute under which prosecutions are brought.

It is therefore not possible to identify the occupation of a defendant who has been prosecuted or convicted of a criminal offence. As a result the information requested on court proceedings is not available.


Next Section Index Home Page