Previous Section Index Home Page

17 Nov 2008 : Column 215W—continued

Midwives

Mr. Hancock: To ask the Secretary of State for Health how many midwives were working in the National
17 Nov 2008 : Column 216W
Health Service in (a) England and (b) Portsmouth in (i) each year between 1997 and 2001 and (ii) 2003 expressed as both (A) headcount and (B) full-time equivalent. [235576]

Ann Keen: The number of registered national health service midwives in England and working in Portsmouth Hospital NHS Trust in the years requested is detailed in the following table.

NHS hospital and community health services: qualified midwifery staff in England, the south central strategic health authority area and Portsmouth Hospitals NHS Trust as at 30 September each specified year
Headcount

1997 1998 1999 2000 2001 2003

England

22,385

22,841

22,799

22,572

23,075

23,941

of which

Portsmouth Hospitals NHS Trust

267

272

252

254

241

246

England

18,053

18,168

17,876

17,662

18,048

18,444

of which

Portsmouth Hospitals NHS Trust

211

211

195

194

186

188

Notes:
1. Full time equivalent figures are rounded to the nearest whole number.
2. Data Quality
Workforce statistics are compiled from data sent by more than 300 NHS trusts and primary care trusts (PCTs) in England. The NHS Information Centre for health and social care liaises closely with these organisations to encourage submission of complete and valid data and seeks to minimise inaccuracies and the effect of missing and invalid data. Processing methods and procedures are continually being updated to improve data quality. Where this happens any impact on figures already published will be assessed but unless this is significant at national level they will not be changed. Where there is impact only at detailed or local level this will be footnoted in relevant analyses.
Source:
The NHS Information Centre for health and social care Non-Medical Workforce Census.

NHS Pharmacy Education and Development Committee: Finance

Mark Simmonds: To ask the Secretary of State for Health what (a) capital, (b) revenue and (c) other funding his Department has given to the NHS Pharmacy Education and Development Committee since its inception. [235255]

Dawn Primarolo: None.

NHS: Finance

Mr. Lansley: To ask the Secretary of State for Health whether the Government plan to top-slice surpluses in NHS organisations in 2008-09. [235615]

Mr. Bradshaw: The 2008-09 National Health Service Operating Framework clearly states that in 2008-09, strategic health authorities (SHAs) may determine and agree locally with their primary care trusts (PCTs) arrangements for the transfer and lodging of resources with the SHA, provided this is within the limit of the overall SHA planned surplus. SHAs will be accountable for the management of this flexibility.


17 Nov 2008 : Column 217W

Mr. Lansley: To ask the Secretary of State for Health what guidance his Department has issued to strategic health authorities on the repayment of funds top-sliced from primary care trusts in the last two years. [235616]

Mr. Bradshaw: In the Operating Framework for 2007-08 (which has already been placed in the Library) the Department stated that contributions from primary care trusts (PCTs) required to deliver the financial plans within their economy must be subject to locally agreed transparent rules, clearly covering the purpose of the reserves and the timescale over which each organisation would recover its contribution.

The Operating Framework for 2008-09 also stated that each strategic health authority (SHA) would determine locally the arrangements for transfer and lodging of resources with the SHA.

Mr. Lansley: To ask the Secretary of State for Health pursuant to the Answer of 3 November 2008, Official Report, column 87W, on NHS finance, whether NHS organisations that generated a surplus in 2007-08 are permitted to count this towards the surplus they are expected to generate in 2008-09. [235720]

Mr. Bradshaw: The Department has made clear in the 2008-09 Operating Framework that the surplus delivered by strategic health authorities and primary care trusts in 2007-08 will be carried forward to 2008-09. As a result, this surplus relating to the 2007-08 financial year is included within the financial position reported in 2008-09.

We also made clear in the 2008-09 Operating Framework that we expect the national health service should plan for a surplus at least equivalent to the surplus achieved in 2007-08.

Mr. Lansley: To ask the Secretary of State for Health pursuant to the Answer of 3 November 2008, Official Report, column 87W, on NHS finance, whether his Department expects that the 2007-08 surplus will be spent by the end of 2008-09. [235721]

Mr. Bradshaw: We made it clear in the Operating Framework 2008-09 for that surpluses generated in 2007-08 will be carried forward to 2008-09, and that the national health service should plan for a surplus at least equivalent to the surplus achieved in 2007-08.

As reported in the 2008-09 quarter 1 edition of “The Quarter”, the NHS (excluding Foundation Trusts) was forecasting an overall surplus of £1.75 billion. This forecast enables the full deployment of baseline and additional resources for 2008-09, and continues with our strategy for flexibility to respond to fluctuations in demand, while maintaining sufficient funds for investment in new services.

The surplus generated within the NHS during 2008-09 will be carried forward to 2009-10.

Mr. Lansley: To ask the Secretary of State for Health pursuant to the Answer of 3 November 2008, Official Report, columns 88-89W, on NHS finance, whether any restrictions are placed on NHS organisations as to how they spend surpluses which are carried over into the next financial year. [235728]


17 Nov 2008 : Column 218W

Mr. Bradshaw: We made clear in the Operating Framework 2008-09 that surpluses generated in 2007-08 will be carried forward to 2008-09, and that the national health service should plan for a surplus at least equivalent to the surplus achieved in 2007-08.

“The Operating Framework for 2008-09” clearly states that strategic health authorities have the flexibility to determine within their economies, the level of contingency necessary to ensure delivery of their financial plans, and where this contingency is best held.

Aside from this, the Department has placed no restrictions (further to the normal accounting rules) on how NHS organisations spend their surpluses.

NHS: Personal Records

Mr. Stephen O'Brien: To ask the Secretary of State for Health pursuant to the Answer of 3 June 2008, Official Report, columns 909-10W, on NHS: personal records, how many of the incidents recorded in the table took place on 25 December in each year. [233732]

Ann Keen: The number of incidents reported to the National Reporting and Learning System relating to nutritional care, which occurred on 25 December during 2005, 2006 and 2007 are shown in the following table:

Number of incidents

2005

5

2006

9

2007

11


NHS: Private Sector

Mr. Lansley: To ask the Secretary of State for Health with reference to page 9 of his Department's consultation document on Guidance on NHS patients who wish to pay for additional private care, which relevant national audits he expects clinicians to contribute to. [235612]

Mr. Bradshaw: Recommendation 11 of Professor Richards's report, ‘Improving Access to Medicines for NHS Patients’, states that:

A copy of the report has been placed in the Library.

On 4 November, my right hon. Friend the Secretary of State accepted this recommendation, and asked Professor Richards to lead this piece of work. The reference in the consultation document to "relevant national audits" is therefore a reference to the outcome of this work.

NHS: Telephone Numbering

Paul Rowen: To ask the Secretary of State for Health how much revenue the national health service received from the use of revenue sharing telephone numbers in each of the last five years. [236297]

Mr. Bradshaw: This information is not held centrally.


17 Nov 2008 : Column 219W

NHS: Temporary Employment

Mr. Lansley: To ask the Secretary of State for Health what contracts the NHS negotiates with employment agencies regarding the pay of agency staff (a) in England and (b) at regional level. [235620]

Mr. Bradshaw: This information is not collected centrally. It is the responsibility of local national health service organisations to plan and manage their demand for agency staff in the context of local business and work force planning. Many NHS organisations use the NHS Purchasing and Supplies Agency (PASA), Agency Framework Agreements to contract some of their agency staff as the PASA uses the NHS’s buying power to negotiate lower pay rates with agencies.

Obesity: Health Services

Harry Cohen: To ask the Secretary of State for Health whether he plans to introduce national guidelines for the way NHS staff deal with bariatric people. [235633]

Dawn Primarolo: The National Institute for Health and Clinical Excellence (NICE) has produced “Guidance on the prevention, identification, assessment and management of overweight and obesity in adults and children”, available at

This guidance is for both health and non-health professionals, and contains guidance on when bariatric surgery may be considered as an option.

It is up to primary care trusts as local commissioners and providers of services to determine the most appropriate methods to deliver health care to their populations, based on clinical need and effectiveness, and following medical advice.


17 Nov 2008 : Column 220W

The care and treatment of individual patients who undergo surgery remains a matter for their clinical team who will base the treatment on the most appropriate clinical evidence, and the wishes of the patient.

Organ Donation Taskforce

Gordon Banks: To ask the Secretary of State for Health when he expects the Organ Donation Taskforce next to report. [236070]

Ann Keen: The Organ Donation Taskforce has today published its report ‘The potential impact of an opt out system for organ donation in the UK’. I refer the hon. Member to the written ministerial statement on the report issued today.

Primary Care Trusts

Anne Main: To ask the Secretary of State for Health what reports he has received on the late payment of bills by primary care trusts (PCTs); and what representations his Department has received from (a) cleaning contractors and (b) hospital food contractors on the late payment of bills by PCTs. [234657]

Mr. Bradshaw: The Department routinely collects data from the national health service on the payment of bills. The latest data available for quarter 1 of 2008-09 is as follows, shows the number of NHS and non-NHS bills that were paid by each primary care trust.

NHS trusts and primary care trusts are required to comply with the Confederation of British Industry’s “Better Payment Practice Code” target of paying 95 per cent. of undisputed invoices within contract terms of 30 days where no terms have been agreed.

The Department does not collect information on the payment of bills to specific contractors.


Next Section Index Home Page