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18 Nov 2008 : Column 337W—continued


While over recent years both male and female prisoner populations have increased, generally female prisoners make up about 5 per cent. of the total prison population. In the most recent complete calendar year (2007), about 13 per cent. of prisoner on officer assaults occurred in female prisons.


18 Nov 2008 : Column 338W

Probation Service: Finance

Mr. Malins: To ask the Secretary of State for Justice what the budget of the Probation Service is in 2008-09; and what proportion of that budget is for the care and aftercare of young people in young offender institutions. [235972]

Mr. Hanson: The delegated budget for the probation service for 2008-09 is £914 million resource and £3 million capital. The detail of the proportion of the delegated budget spent on the care and after care of young people—the 18 to 21-year-old offenders—in young offender institutions is not held centrally, and could be obtained only at a disproportionate cost because of the need to survey all 36 probation boards and the six probation trusts. The probation service is not responsible for the care or after care of offenders under 18 years old who are managed by the youth offending teams.

Reoffenders

Mr. Malins: To ask the Secretary of State for Justice what the re-offending rate (a) within six months and (b) within 12 months for young men on release from young offender institutions was in each of the last four years. [235973]

Mr. Hanson: We do not collate figures on reoffending occurring within six months of leaving custody. On an annual basis we publish rates which measure reoffending over a 12-month period.

The following table shows the reoffending figures for juvenile male offenders (aged 10 to 17), who were released from custody in the first quarter of 2003, 2004, 2005 and 2006. The following table shows the proportion of offenders that committed at least one further offence and the number of further offences committed per 100 offenders.

Males

Number of releases from custody Proportion of offenders reoffending (1 year) Number of offences per 100 offenders (1 year)

2003

740

75.7

458.8

2004

751

78.3

430.2

2005

764

75.3

426.2

2006

729

78.9

421.4


The figures include offenders released from young offender institutions, secure training centres and secure children's homes.

We are unable to break the figures down to show only offenders released form young offender institutions.

The latest reoffending statistics for juveniles, ‘Reoffending of juveniles: results from the 2006 cohort’, were published on 4 September 2008 and can be obtained from the Ministry of Justice website:

We have made significant progress in reducing juvenile reoffending. The frequency rate of juvenile reoffending fell by 18.7 per cent. between 2000 to 2006.


18 Nov 2008 : Column 339W

Tim Loughton: To ask the Secretary of State for Justice pursuant to the answer of 10 November 2008, Official Report, column 874W, on reoffenders, how many offenders under 21 years old who had served (a) less than six months, (b) between six months and one year and (c) more than one year reoffended within six months of release since June 2007. [236333]

Mr. Hanson: We do not collate figures on reoffending occurring within six months of leaving custody. On an annual basis we publish rates which measure reoffending over a 12 month period. We also do not hold data on length of custodial sentence for the index offence for juveniles (aged under 18 years).

The following table shows the reoffending figures for offenders aged 18 to 20 who were released from custody in the first quarter of 2004, 2005 and 2006, by the length of sentence that they were given in court (time served in custody will be less than this). The table provides the proportion of offenders that committed at least one further offence and the number of further offences committed per 100 offenders. Offences which result in a conviction at court are counted as a reoffence.

Length of custodial sentence for index offence Year Number of releases from custody Rate of reoffending (1 year) Number of offences per 100 offenders (1 year)

Less than 6 months

2004

1,179

71.5

390.0

2005

1,038

72.2

371.5

2006

933

69.9

356.7

6 months to less than 1 year

2004

320

52.5

268.1

2005

339

52.5

233.0

2006

313

44.1

171.6

1 year and over

2004

644

43.2

180.4

2005

617

38.2

150.6

2006

586

37.7

125.6


The latest reoffending statistics for juveniles, ‘Reoffending of juveniles: results from the 2006 cohort’, were published on 4 September 2008 and can be obtained from the Ministry of Justice website:

The latest reoffending statistics for adults, ‘Reoffending of adults: results from the 2006 cohort’, were published on the same date and can be obtained from:


18 Nov 2008 : Column 340W

Secure Training Centre Rules (Amendment) Rules 2007

Mr. Burrowes: To ask the Secretary of State for Justice when his Department will publish revised draft rules to replace the Secure Training Centre Rules (Amendment) Rules 2007. [235936]

Mr. Hanson: We have applied to the House of Lords for permission to appeal against the court’s decision and await a decision on the application.

The effect of the Court of Appeal’s decision to quash the Secure Training Centre (Amendment) Rules 2007 was to reinstate Rule 38 as it read before the 2007 amendment.

Vandalism: Cemeteries

Mr. Amess: To ask the Secretary of State for Justice which Jewish cemeteries in England and Wales have been desecrated in the last two years; and if he will make a statement. [235692]

Bridget Prentice: This information is not recorded centrally. However we have been told by the Community Security Trust charity that they received reports of nine incidents of desecration of Jewish cemeteries in the United Kingdom in 2006 and six in 2007. For reasons of security and confidentiality they feel it would be inappropriate to make public details of the sites concerned.

Health

Accidents: Cycling

Mr. Lansley: To ask the Secretary of State for Health (1) what estimate his Department has made of the cost to the NHS of treating patients who were involved in cycling accidents and were not wearing a cycle helmet in the latest period for which figures are available; [235603]

(2) how many people were admitted to hospital as a result of cycling accidents in each of the last five financial years. [235607]

Mr. Bradshaw: The national health service has not been asked to identify separately the costs of treating road traffic accident victims or those injured in cycling accidents because of the burden it would impose. Where a patient receives a compensation payment for their injuries, however incurred, the NHS is able to reclaim the costs of their treatment from whoever pays the compensation. In 2007-08, over £137 million was recovered in this way.

Information on admissions to hospital as a result of cycling accidents from 2002-03 to 2006-07 is shown in the following tables.


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18 Nov 2008 : Column 342W
Total admissions to hospital as a result of cycling accidents* from 2002-03 to 2006-07, NHS Hospitals England and activity performed in the Independent sector in England commissioned by English NHS

Total admissions to hospital as a result of cycling accidents V10 Pedal cyclist injured in collision with pedestrian or animal V11 Pedal cyclist injured in collision with other pedal cycle V12 Pedal cyclist injured in collision with 2-3 wheeled motor vehicle V13 Pedal cyclist injured in collision with car pick-up truck or van V14 Pedal cyclist injured in collision with heavy transport vehicle or bus

2006-07

13,368

89

208

62

1,873

129

2005-06

13,533

71

195

59

1,800

118

2004-05

12,659

54

220

53

1,497

120

2003-04

12,049

50

176

54

1,471

118

2002-03

10,795

50

158

61

1471

117


V14 Pedal cyclist injured in collision with heavy transport vehicle or bus V15 Pedal cyclist injured in collision with railway train or railway vehicle V16 Pedal cyclist injured in collision with other nonmotor vehicle V17 Pedal cyclist injured in collision with fixed/stationary object V18 Pedal cyclist injured in noncollision transport accident V19 Pedal cyclist injured in oth and unspc transport accident

2006-07

129

1

18

518

9,191

1,279

2005-06

118

3

8

511

9,538

1,230

2004-05

120

2

19

412

9,119

1,163

2003-04

118

4

17

336

8,687

1,136

2002-03

117

0

20

377

7617

924

Notes:
ICD-10 Clinical Codes External Cause Codes:
V10 Pedal cyclist injured in collision with pedestrian or animal
V11 Pedal cyclist injured in collision with other pedal cycle
V12 Pedal cyclist injured in collision with 2-3 wheeled motor vehicle
V13 Pedal cyclist injured in collision with car pick-up truck or van
V14 Pedal cyclist injured in collision with heavy transport vehicle or bus
V15 Pedal cyclist injured in collision with railway train or railway vehicle
V16 Pedal cyclist injured in collision with other nonmotor vehicle
V17 Pedal cyclist injured in collision with fixed/stationary object
V18 Pedal cyclist injured in noncollision transport accident
V19 Pedal cyclist injured in oth and unspc transport accident
Finished admission episodes
A finished admission episode is the first period of inpatient care under one consultant within one healthcare provider. Finished admission episodes are counted against the year in which the admission episode finishes. Please note that admissions do not represent the number of inpatients, as a person may have more than one admission within the year.
Cause code
The cause code is a supplementary code that indicates the nature of any external cause of injury, poisoning or other adverse effects. The field within HES counts only the first external cause code which is coded within the episode.
Data Quality
Hospital Episode Statistics (HES) are compiled from data sent by more than 300 NHS trusts and primary care trusts (PCTs) in England. Data are also received from a number of independent sector organisations for activity commissioned by the English NHS. The NHS Information Centre for health and social care liaises closely with these organisations to encourage submission of complete and valid data and seeks to minimise inaccuracies and the effect of missing and invalid data via HES processes. While this brings about improvement over time, some shortcomings remain.
Ungrossed data
Figures have not been adjusted for shortfalls in data (i.e. the data are ungrossed).
Assessing growth through time
HES figures are available from 1989-90 onwards. During the years that these records have been collected by the NHS there have been ongoing improvements in quality and coverage. These improvements in information submitted by the NHS have been particularly marked in the earlier years and need to be borne in mind when analysing time series.
Some of the increase in figures for later years (particularly 2006-07 onwards) may be due to the improvement in the coverage of independent sector activity.
Changes in NHS practice also need to be borne in mind when analysing time series. For example, a number of procedures may now be undertaken in outpatient settings and may no longer be accounted for in the HES data. This may account for any reductions in activity over time.
Source:
Hospital Episode Statistics (HES), The NHS Information Centre for health and social care

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