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16 Dec 2008 : Column 720W—continued


Mr. Garnier: To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department how many people were charged with an offence of violence against the person in each of the last two years for which figures are available; and how many received a police caution and were not prosecuted. [242063]

Mr. Alan Campbell: Statistics on the number of persons charged with offences are not collected centrally. The available information relates to persons proceeded against and cautioned and these figures are published by the Ministry of Justice. There were 61,056 persons proceeded against for violence against the person offences in 2007 and 64,763 in 2006. The number who received a caution for violence against the person was 52,334 in 2007 and 57,273 in 2006.

Crimes of Violence: Health Services

Paul Holmes: To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department how many people aged (a) between 18 and 23, (b) between 24 and 29, (c) between 30 and 35, (d) between 36 and 40 and (e) over 41 years old have been arrested for assaulting paramedics in each month of the last five years. [243545]

Mr. Alan Campbell [holding answer 15 December 2008]: The data requested are not collected centrally.

The arrests collection held by the Home Office covers arrests for recorded crime (notifiable offences) only, broken down at a main offence group level, covering categories such as violence against the person and robbery.

It is not possible to identify assaults of a paramedic from within the “violence against the person” offence group.

Information on assaults of NHS staff is a matter for the Department of Health.

Paul Holmes: To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department how many people have been arrested in each local authority area for assaulting a paramedic in each month of the last five years. [243546]


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Mr. Alan Campbell [holding answer 15 December 2008]: The data requested are not collected centrally.

The arrests collection held by the Home Office covers arrests for recorded crime (notifiable offences) only, broken down at a main offence group level, covering categories such as violence against the person and robbery.

It is not possible to identify assaults of a paramedic from within the “violence against the person” offence group.

Information on assaults of NHS staff is a matter for the Department of Health.

Driving Under Influence: Hampshire

Sandra Gidley: To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department how many people resident in (a) Southampton, (b) Test Valley Borough and (c) the ceremonial county of Hampshire were breathalysed and recorded as below the drink-driving limit in each of the last five years. [243914]

Mr. Alan Campbell: The Home Office breath tests collection covers the number of screening breath tests taken and the number positive or refused. The available information covering the Hampshire police force area (which includes the Isle of Wight) is given in the following table.

Screening breath tests conducted and the number positive or refused, Hampshire police force area 2002-06
Number of tests Number positive /r efused

2002

35,200

4,000

2003

37,500

4,000

2004

38,400

3,800

2005

38,300

4,300

2006

34,800

3,700

Note:
Every effort is made to ensure that the figures presented are accurate and complete. However, it is important to note that these data have been extracted from large administrative data systems generated by police forces. As a consequence, care should be taken to ensure data collection processes and their inevitable limitations are taken into account when those data are used.

Information collected centrally is broken down by police force area only therefore data for Southampton and the Test Valley borough are not available. Additionally, the collection does not identify the addresses of persons tested.

Drug Seizures

Mr. Grieve: To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department when the proposed pilot scheme to test the benefits of establishing a national forensic database of drug seizures will be established; where it will take place; and what the cost of the scheme will be. [241862]

Jacqui Smith: The pilot scheme started on 6 October 2008. The collection of data will take place nationally. This data will be processed on a SOCA site in the Birmingham area. SOCA has funding of £700,000 for the pilot.

Drugs: Crime

Damian Green: To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department how many crack house closures there were in (a) Ashford and (b) Kent in each of the last five years. [243114]


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Mr. Alan Campbell: The Anti-social Behaviour Act 2003 introduced the provision for police to serve a closure notice on any premises that are believed by the police to be used for the production, supply or use of class A drugs, and which are causing serious nuisance or disorder.

The Home Office collects data on the number of closure orders issued through the voluntary Crime Disorder Reduction Partnership (CDRP) survey of antisocial behaviour tools and powers. Latest available data from this survey cover the period from October 2003 to September 2007 and show that in the Ashford CDRP area one such order was served (in 2007). There were 11 closure orders served in Kent over this period, in 2004-05 the figure was two, in 2005-06 the figure was six, in 2006-07 the figure was two, and between April and September 2007 one such closure order was served.

Data for 2007-08 will be published early in 2009.

Drugs: Crime Prevention

Mr. Grieve: To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department how much her Department plans to spend in total on tackling drugs in (a) 2008-09, (b) 2009-10 and (c) 2010-11. [241538]

Jacqui Smith: Labelled expenditure is defined as that which is included in budgets, is drug-specific and is proactive, in that it is linked to the achievement of specific policy aims. Home Office labelled expenditure for the current financial year is £160.39 million. While precise figures for Home Office labelled expenditure are not yet available for the financial years 2009-10 and 2010-11, it is expected that the figure will remain broadly stable.

In addition to labelled expenditure, the Home Office meets the costs of activity which is reactive, such as enforcement of the laws surrounding drugs.

Further details of the resources invested by Government departments are set out in an appendix to the drug strategy, which can be viewed at:

Mr. Grieve: To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department with reference to the answer of 22 October 2008, Official Report, column 442W, on drugs: crime prevention, when she expects data on crackhouse closure orders in 2007-08 to be available. [241873]

Jacqui Smith: Data on crackhouse closure orders for the 2007-08 period will be published through the CDRP survey of antisocial behaviour tools and powers, which will be available early in 2009.

Entry Clearances: Biometrics

Mr. Grieve: To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department for how long biometric information collected from a recipient of a biometric visa may be retained once the individual is no longer resident in the UK. [241537]

Jacqui Smith: The Immigration (Provision of Physical Data) Regulations 2006 allow biometric data collected as part of the visa application process to be retained for
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a maximum period of 10 years. However, there are circumstances when this period may be less. These are if a person becomes a British Citizen or a Commonwealth Citizen who has a right of abode in the UK as a result of section 2(1)(b) of the Immigration Act 1971.

Entry Clearances: Business

Mr. Grieve: To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department whether there is a limit on the number of times a person can be granted entry to the UK for six months as a business visitor. [241611]

Jacqui Smith: There is no restriction on the number of business visits a person may make to the UK, or any requirement that a specified time must elapse between successive visits. The fact that a person has made a series of visits with only brief intervals between them would not, in the absence of any other relevant factors, constitute sufficient grounds for refusal of leave to enter.

Genetics: Databases

Mr. Grieve: To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department with reference to the answer of 10 September 2008, Official Report, columns 1767-8W, on genetics: databases, of the 14,000 offences linked to DNA profiles retained since 2001, how many were detected crimes in which an offender was brought to justice. [241669]

Jacqui Smith: It has been assumed that this question refers to the written answer on 10 July 2008, Official Report, columns 1767-8W (as the Official Report for 10 September 2008 does not include a written answer at columns 1767-8W on Genetics: Databases).

The written answer on 10 July 2008, Official Report, columns 1767-8W referred to research information on the number of DNA profiles taken from persons arrested, charged but not convicted of an offence that have resulted in a DNA match, providing the police with an intelligence link on the possible identity of the offender and assisting in the detection of crimes. The research information indicated that in the period May 2001 to December 2005, an estimated 200,000 DNA samples taken from people charged with offences had been retained on the NDNAD, which would previously have had to be removed because of the absence of a conviction. From these, approximately 8,500 profiles of individuals have been linked with crime scene profiles, involving nearly 14,000 offences. These offences included 114 murders, 55 attempted murders and 116 rapes.

No information is available on how many of the 14,000 offences linked to DNA profiles retained since 2001 were detected and on whether an offender was brought to justice. It is understood that this information would have been too time-consuming for the researchers to collate; it would have involved requesting information on the outcomes of the 14,000 crimes from the 43 police forces in England and Wales and subsequent checks by forces of case record systems.

I have asked the National Policing Improvement Agency to look into the possibility of updating the research information on the number of DNA profiles taken from persons arrested, charged but not convicted of an offence that have resulted in a DNA match, providing the police with information on the possible identity of the offender.


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Mr. Frank Field: To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department how many individuals have a record on the national DNA database; and of these how many have not been convicted of any crime. [243763]

Mr. Alan Campbell [holding answer 15 December 2008]: At 30 September 2008, there were an estimated 4,631,838 persons with a profile on the National DNA Database (NDNAD). Of these, an estimated 4,355,904 persons had been sampled by forces in England and Wales.

Data on arrest and criminal histories are not held on the NDNAD, but are held on the Police National Computer (PNC). Such data are not available routinely, but the National Policing Improvement Agency obtains information periodically on the number of persons on the NDNAD who have a conviction and on the number of those who have not. This information was last obtained at the end of March 2008.

On 31 March 2008, there were an estimated 4,116,713 persons on the NDNAD sampled by police forces in England and Wales, of whom 3,832,986 persons had a record retained on PNC. Of these, over 3.25 million persons had a conviction, caution, formal warning or reprimand recorded on the PNC and around 573,600 persons had no current conviction, caution, formal warning or reprimand recorded on PNC.

The 573,600 figure includes some persons who may have had a caution or conviction record removed from PNC after five to 10 years in accordance with the Rules for Criminal Record Weeding (which applied prior to April 2006); persons who have been charged and acquitted or proceedings discontinued; persons who have been charged with a recordable offence and proceedings are on-going; and persons who have been arrested but no further action was taken against them.

The PNC records for the other 283,727 persons had been removed from the PNC for various reasons, for example, their conviction and caution records had been weeded after five to 10 years, the person had been acquitted or proceedings were discontinued.

Mr. Frank Field: To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department how many times the national DNA database has been accessed in relation to a case where (a) a conviction was made and (b) a conviction was not made; and how many convicted individuals in such circumstances had a DNA profile on the database but had no prior conviction. [243765]

Mr. Alan Campbell [holding answer 15 December 2008]: The National DNA Database (NDNAD) functions by comparing subject profiles taken from individuals against DNA crime scene profiles retrieved from unsolved crimes. It cannot be accessed directly by the police service. The NDNAD currently generates around 3,100 matches per month. Details of matches are sent to the relevant police force, providing key intelligence on the possible identity of the offender.

Information on the number of convictions in which DNA profiles from the NDNAD have been used in evidence is not collected by the Home Office, as convictions are obtained by integrated criminal investigation and not by forensic science alone.


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However, data have been collected since 1998 on the number of crimes detected in which a DNA match was available and/or played a part in solving the crime. It is estimated that over the period April 1998 to March 2008, there have been over 272,000 such detections.

Information on the number of detections/convictions in which DNA subject sample profiles on the NDNAD taken from persons with no previous convictions have been used in evidence is not available from the NDNAD, nor is it available from police force data collected by the Home Office on forensic activity and related detections. The NDNAD holds DNA profiles taken from persons arrested for a recordable offence but does not hold data on their criminal histories; this information is held on the police national computer (PNC).

Human Trafficking

Mr. Gerrard: To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department what her Department’s definition is of a person who has been trafficked. [241130]

Mr. Alan Campbell: The Department considers a victim of human trafficking to be an individual who has been subjected to the crimes set out in sections 57-60 of the Sexual Offences Act 2003 and section 4 of the Asylum and Immigration (Treatment of Claimants) Act 2004.

However, identifying if someone is a victim of human trafficking is a complex issue. It is a largely an unreported crime and there is also a need to protect against fraudulent claims. The UK is currently in the process of developing a formal identification procedure to help identify if there are reasonable grounds to believe that an individual is a victim of human trafficking. This will follow the internationally recognised definitions of human trafficking as set out in the Palermo protocol.

Damian Green: To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department what percentage of people-trafficking related (a) investigations, (b) resultant trials and (c) subsequent convictions have arisen through the activity of the Metropolitan Police Human Trafficking Unit in each year since its inception. [243145]

Mr. Alan Campbell: It is not possible to give a percentage breakdown of trials and investigations which are ongoing throughout the country.

The data provided by the UK Human Trafficking Centre indicate that of the 92 convictions secured for offences of human trafficking for sexual exploitation, 28 have been as a result of operations by the police in the Metropolitan Police Service area. It is not possible to break down the number solely related to the work of the Met’s trafficking unit as operations against this crime often involve officers from the boroughs, the clubs and vice unit as well as from the joint operations involving UKBA staff.

The number of convictions by year is as follows:


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