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21 Jan 2009 : Column 1462W—continued


Rounded numbers
2007 2008( 1)
Councils with social services responsibilities Domiciliary care( 1) Residential care( 2, 3) Domiciliary care( 1) Residential care( 2, 3)

England

646,500

190,300

661,400

182,200

North East

47,850

13,200

45,750

12,650

Darlington

1,385

530

1,415

590

Hartlepool

1,790

460

1,815

440

Middlesbrough

2,950

630

3,050

655

Redcar and Cleveland

2,495

680

2,675

680

Stockton on Tees

2,805

960

2,885

855

(1 )Data for 2007-08 is provisional.
(2) Excludes other unstaffed homes and adult placements.
(3 )Data includes clients formerly in receipt of preserved rights.
(4 )Data includes Boyd loophole residents.
(5 )Not available. Guidance was restated for 2004-05 referrals, assessments and packages of care (RAP) collection and data are not comparable.
Source:
RAP form P2s & SR1 form Table S4

Health Services: Ethnic Groups

Dr. Kumar: To ask the Secretary of State for Health what steps the Government plans to take in response to the Healthcare Commission's finding in its report, Count Me In, that people from an ethnic minority are more likely to be misdiagnosed, overmedicated and placed in seclusion. [249514]


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Phil Hope: The Healthcare Commission published its report on the 2008 Count Me In census on 27 November 2008. Count Me In does not collect information about patients’ diagnosis or medication. The census reports since 2005 show that there is no consistent picture of differential treatment with regard to seclusion. Different ethnic groups have been recorded as more or less likely to be subject to seclusion each year.

In 2005 the Department launched ‘Delivering Race Equality in Mental Health Care’ (DRE). DRE is a five-year action plan designed to improve black and minority ethnic (BME) communities’ experience of mental health services.

Hospitals: Parking

Mr. Stephen O'Brien: To ask the Secretary of State for Health what instructions he has given to trusts to (a) allow families to reclaim the cost of hospital car parking charges incurred when visiting their children and (b) provide free car parking bays in hospitals for parents visiting their children. [249783]

Mr. Bradshaw: Car parking arrangements, including charges, are a matter for individual national health service bodies, based on their own local circumstances. However, guidance from the Department to support trusts in implementing parking policies, issued in December 2006, strongly recommends NHS bodies to provide free or discounted car parking to those patients and their relatives or primary visitors who have to use the car park regularly. The Department reminded NHS bodies of this in November 2008.

Mental Health Services: Prisoners

Mr. Hands: To ask the Secretary of State for Health with reference to the answer to the hon. Member for Caernarfon of 30 October 2008, Official Report, column 1245W, how many of the 926 prisoners with mental illness who were transferred from prison to hospital in 2007 (a) remain in hospital, (b) were returned to prison and (c) absconded. [245964]

Phil Hope: This information is not collected by the Department. The Ministry of Justice (MoJ) have supplied information in respect of individual patients with mental illness transferred from the prison service to hospital.

Further to the answer to the hon. Member for Caernarfon (Hywel Williams) of 30 October 2008, Official Report, column 1245W, the MoJ have revised their data and report that the number of prisoners with mental illness and who were transferred to hospital in 2007 was 934, not 926.

Of these 934 patients, 301 remain in hospital, 167 were returned to prison and one patient absconded and is still at large. Of the remaining 465 individuals, 219 were remitted to a court to deal with as unsentenced prisoners who were awaiting a court appearance when transferred to hospital. A further 242 were either not subject to restrictions at the time of transfer, or saw their restrictions expire after transfer, and would have remained in hospital only so long as their mental condition required it. Of the remaining four individuals, one has been deported and three have died.


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These figures include six people who absconded at some point during their stay in hospital and later returned.

Mrs. Gillan: To ask the Secretary of State for Health how much his Department has spent on mental health services for prisoners in each (a) prison and (b) health authority area in each of the last five financial years; and how many prisoners received such treatment in each of these years. [247068]

Phil Hope: Information on spending on mental health services in each prison and health authority between 2002-03 and 2006-07 is shown in the tables, which have been placed in the Library. As of 2007-08, this allocation was baselined to form part of the overall prison health allocation and spending on offender mental health services is no longer referred to separately.

In addition to this recurrent funding, the Department has made two non-recurrent payments totalling £4.2 million in 2007-08 and 2008-09 to targeted establishments for mental health in-reach services.

Information on the number of prisoners receiving mental health services is not collected centrally.

Mid Essex Primary Care Trust

Mr. Burns: To ask the Secretary of State for Health what reasons were reported to him by the Chief Executive of NHS Mid Essex for the decision to change the name of the Mid Essex Primary Care Trust; and if he will make a statement. [249899]

Mr. Bradshaw: The information requested is not held by the Department.

Primary care trusts (PCTs) have the freedom to choose whether or not they make the transition to the new identity, ‘NHS Local’ (rather than ‘Local’ PCT). In order to keep costs to a minimum, we advise that the transition is made when it is practically and economically feasible to do so through planned replacement programmes. This may be by, for example, exhausting existing supplies of stationery and updating property signage.

You may wish to inquire with your local PCT for further information.

Musculoskeletal Disorders

Mr. Lansley: To ask the Secretary of State for Health what estimate he has made of the total number of people who are affected by long-standing musculoskeletal problems, broken down by (a) condition and (b) age group; and what his Department's definition of a long-standing musculoskeletal problem is. [249248]

Ann Keen: A long-standing musculoskeletal problem is defined as a non time-limited medical condition which predominately affects the muscles, joints and skeleton.

We have made no estimate of the number of people living with long-standing musculoskeletal problems, broken down by condition and age group.

Mr. Lansley: To ask the Secretary of State for Health what recent estimate he has made of the proportion of primary care consultations which relate to musculoskeletal complaints, broken down by the proportion relating to
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(a) rheumatoid arthritis, (b) osteoarthritis, (c) osteoporosis and (d) other complaints; and what assessment he has made of future trends in this proportion. [249252]

Ann Keen: Such information is not held centrally.

Musculoskeletal Disorders: Carers

Mr. Lansley: To ask the Secretary of State for Health what steps he is taking to train those carers caring for people with musculoskeletal conditions through (a) the Caring with Confidence programme and (b) other means. [249277]

Phil Hope: At a national level the training provided by Caring with Confidence is in two forms—generic and ‘tailored’. The generic training is relevant to any carer (i.e. including those caring for someone with a musculoskeletal condition) and has been available since August 2008, the ‘tailored’ training will meet the needs of specific carers i.e. those who are caring for someone with dementia, or caring for someone of black or minority ethnic background, and will become available over the coming months.

The determination of the carer groups to be provided ‘tailored’ training was made following consultation with the national carers' charities and providers of training to carers—those with musculoskeletal problems were not identified in this process. Should the need for ‘tailored’ training for carers of those with musculoskeletal conditions emerge there is flexibility to meet this need within Caring with Confidence's delivery arrangements.

Carers can also access NHS Choices, which has much information on musculoskeletal conditions.

At a local level, it is for local health service providers to ensure that people with musculoskeletal conditions and their carers receive the necessary information and support they require.

Musculoskeletal Disorders: Employment Services

Mr. Lansley: To ask the Secretary of State for Health how many people with musculoskeletal problems have participated in condition management programmes under the Pathways to Work scheme in each year since 2006-07; and what proportion of such participants he estimates returned to work after participation. [249273]

Ann Keen: The number of referrals from Jobcentre Plus to the NHS Condition Management Programmes of individuals who had musculoskeletal problems are as follows:

Referrals

2006-07

2,801

2007-08

5,974

2008 to November 2008

4,485


Job outcome figures are not collected for the Condition Management Programme.

Musculoskeletal Disorders: Health Professions

Mr. Lansley: To ask the Secretary of State for Health what assessment he has made of the extent to which NHS units treating musculoskeletal conditions in England
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include representatives of the (a) rheumatology and (b) orthopaedics medical specialties; and if he will make a statement. [249249]

Ann Keen: The Department does not collect centrally information on the representation of different disciplines in musculoskeletal departments. It is for local organisations to decide on the staffing structure of their individual departments. The national musculoskeletal coordinating group includes representation of both the British Society for Rheumatology, British Orthopaedic Association as well as other professional bodies.

Musculoskeletal Disorders: Health Services

Mr. Lansley: To ask the Secretary of State for Health how many clinical assessment and treatment services for musculoskeletal conditions there were in the NHS in (a) 2006 and (b) 2008; and if he will make a statement. [249250]

Ann Keen: The Department does not collect centrally information on the number of clinical assessment and treatment services for musculoskeletal conditions.

Mr. Lansley: To ask the Secretary of State for Health what steps he is taking to encourage faster referral from GPs to specialists of patients with serious musculoskeletal problems. [249276]

Ann Keen: The Department has developed five orthopaedic commissioning pathways which pertain to musculoskeletal conditions hip pain, knee pain, shoulder pain, chronic pain back pain and carpal tunnel syndrome. These were published as part of 43 18-week commissioning pathways that reflect national good practice. These pathways highlight the types of conditions that need to be referred for specialist assessments as well as stressing clinical urgent conditions (often referred to as red flag patients) that need emergency treatment. A further pathway is currently in development for arthritis.

The pathways are high-level service models to help support and enable commissioners and service providers to challenge existing practice, utilise service improvement tools and techniques, maximise opportunities for transformational change, provide a catalyst for local discussion and challenge in order to deliver 18-week pathways.

From the 1 January 2009, the minimum expectation of consultant-led elective services will be that no one should wait more than 18 weeks from the time they are referred to the start of their treatment, unless it is clinically appropriate to do so or they choose to wait longer.

Musculoskeletal Disorders: Surgery

Mr. Lansley: To ask the Secretary of State for Health how many and what proportion of patients with musculoskeletal problems were listed for surgery by a clinical assessment and treatment service in each year since 2005. [249242]

Ann Keen: The Department does not collect this information centrally.


21 Jan 2009 : Column 1467W

Neonatal Mortality

Mr. Drew: To ask the Secretary of State for Health how many (a) babies were delivered in each NHS trust and (b) unexplained neonatal deaths there were in each of the last three years. [248217]

Kevin Brennan: I have been asked to reply.

The information requested falls within the responsibility of the UK Statistics Authority. I have asked the authority to reply.

Letter from Karen Dunnell, dated January 2009:


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