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26 Jan 2009 : Column 92W—continued


Table 2: Number of offences recorded and detection rates for selected offences in the Metropolitan Police area—2002-03 to 2007-08( 1)
Burglary Violence against the person Theft offences( 2)
Financial year Number of offences Detection rate (percentage) Number of offences Detection rate (percentage) Number of offences Detection rate (percentage)

2002-03

113,427

13

178,782

24

463,665

8

2003-04

105,361

12

186,187

26

448,818

8

2004-05

101,474

13

201,923

43

412,264

10

2005-06

103,510

15

197,262

45

400,387

11

2006-07

96,728

16

182,354

31

365,714

10

2007-08

93,894

13

172,741

36

332,156

12

(1) The data in this table take account of the introduction of the National Crime Recording Standard in April 2002. These figures are not directly comparable with those for earlier years.
(2) Includes offences against vehicles and other thefts.

Crimes of Violence: Hillingdon

Mr. Randall: To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department how many incidents of violence against the person were recorded (a) in total and (b) per 100 population in (i) Uxbridge constituency and (ii) the London borough of Hillingdon between 1997 and 2008. [250897]

Mr. Alan Campbell: The available data relate to recorded offences of violence against the person in the Hillingdon Basic Command Unit. Data at Basic Command Unit level for violence against the person are only available from 1999-2000. Data for Uxbridge are not collected centrally.

Table 1: Recorded offences of violence against the person in the Hillingdon Basic Command Unit -1999-2000 to 2001-02( 1)

Number of offences Rate per 100 population

1999-2000

3,713

1.5

2000-01

4,094

1.6

2001-02

4,766

1.9

(1) The data in this table are prior to the introduction of the National Crime Recording Standard. These figures are not directly comparable with those for later years.

Table 2: Recorded offences of violence against the person in the Hillingdon Basic Command Unit—2002-03 to 2007-08( 1)

Number of offences Rate per 100 population

2002-03

4,983

2.0

2003-04

5,222

2.1

2004-05

5,921

2.4

2005-06

6,261

2.5

2006-07

5,911

2.3

2007-08

5,882

2.4

(1) The data in this table take account of the introduction of the National Crime Recording Standard in April 2002. These figures are not directly comparable with those for earlier years.

Driving Under Influence: Cambridgeshire

Mr. Stewart Jackson: To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department how many drink driving offences have been recorded in the area served by the Northern Basic Command Unit of Cambridgeshire Constabulary in each quarter since May 2004; and if she will make a statement. [250806]

Mr. Alan Campbell: Offences of driving while unfit through drink are summary offences and do not feature in the recorded crime statistics collected by the Home Office.


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The Home Office does collect data on recorded offences of ‘Causing death by dangerous or careless driving' (including whilst under the influence of drink or drugs). However, it is not possible to determine from the information held centrally which, if any, of these offences were committed while the offender was under the influence of alcohol.

Driving Under Influence: Hillingdon

Mr. Randall: To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department how many offences of (a) drug and (b) drink driving were recorded in (i) Uxbridge constituency and (ii) the London Borough of Hillingdon in each year since 1997. [250770]

Mr. Alan Campbell: Offences of driving while unfit through drugs or drink are summary offences and do not feature in the recorded crime statistics collected by the Home Office.

The Home Office does collect data on recorded offences of “Causing death by dangerous or careless driving (including whilst under the influence of drink or drugs)”. However, it is not possible to determine from the information held centrally which, if any, of these offences were committed while the offender was under the influence.

The available information for the above offence is given in the following table. The data relate to the Hillingdon basic command unit and data at this level are only available from 2000-01. Data for Uxbridge are not collected centrally.

Recorded offences of causing death by dangerous or careless driving (including while under the influence of drink or drugs) in the Hillingdon basic command unit

Number of offences

2000-01

0

2001-02

0

2002-03

1

2003-04

1

2004-05

2

2005-06

3

2006-07

0

2007-08

0


Drugs: Statistics

Mr. Grieve: To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department with reference to the announcement on her Department’s Research, Development and Statistics website, why the National Statistics bulletin Drug Offenders England and Wales is being withdrawn with immediate effect. [250467]

Mr. Alan Campbell: The decision to withdraw this bulletin has been made for several reasons.

Responsibility for offender statistics passed to the Ministry of Justice last year. MOJ has absorbed the drug offender series into its overall offender statistics outputs, such as the Criminal Statistics command paper. My statisticians conducted an extensive consultation exercise, both internally and externally, which revealed dwindling demand for a separate drug offenders bulletin. They have been assured by their MOJ colleagues, that any material previously published in the Drug Offenders England and Wales bulletin would continue be available either in MOJ publications or on request.


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The recommendation to withdraw this bulletin was endorsed by the national statistician, the chair of the UK Statistics Authority, the chief statistician and the chief scientific adviser in the Home Office and myself.

Electronic Surveillance

James Brokenshire: To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department which agencies outside the United Kingdom are permitted to undertake remote surveillance of the use of an individual's computer in the UK; and under what legislation such surveillance is permitted. [250874]

Mr. Coaker: None. Such activity without the system owner's permission would constitute an offence under the Computer Misuse Act 1990.

Extradition

Paul Holmes: To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department how many people have been extradited from the UK to (a) Zimbabwe, (b) Colombia, (c) Cuba, (d) Iraq, (e) Israel and (f) the Russian Federation in each year since 1997. [248615]

Meg Hillier: Statistical information of this kind is only available from 1998 onwards. In the period from 1998 to 2008, the United Kingdom extradited three persons to Israel (one in 1998 and two in 2006). There were no extraditions to the other countries listed.

Human Trafficking

John McDonnell: To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department what research her Department is using to ascertain the number of people who have been trafficked into the UK; and if she will place in the Library a copy of that research. [244930]

Mr. Alan Campbell: The covert nature of the crime makes it very difficult to provide an accurate assessment of the scale of the problem faced by the United Kingdom.

The UK Human Trafficking Centre and the Serious Organised Crime Agency continue to develop our knowledge of the scale of human trafficking through a variety of means, including analysis of the outcomes of Operation Pentameter 2 and ongoing intelligence collation. In addition to the work being undertake by these agencies, funding is in place for dedicated intelligence officers in each of the 10 Regional Intelligence Units in England and Wales to focus on organised immigration crime, including human trafficking.

We expect to have an up to date assessment of the extent of the problem faced by the UK by the end of the year.

John McDonnell: To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department under what protocols her Department operates when managing people deemed to have been trafficked. [247520]

Mr. Alan Campbell: On 17 December 2008 we ratified the Council of Europe convention on action against trafficking in human beings. By April 2009 at the latest we will introduce a reflection period of 45 days and a renewable one year residence permit for identified victims
26 Jan 2009 : Column 95W
of human trafficking. Additionally we are introducing formal identification measures under a national referral mechanism by which victims are systematically identified by a competent authority and referred to appropriate support.

This will further strengthen our existing collaborative way of identifying, referring and supporting victims.

Identity Cards: Welsh Language

Mrs. Gillan: To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department (1) whether identity cards will be produced (a) in English and Welsh, (b) in English only and (c) in Welsh only when asked for by an individual; [247079]

(2) what estimate she has made of the extra costs of producing identity cards in Welsh and English instead of in English. [247080]

Meg Hillier: The initial identity cards issued to British citizens, starting in the second half of 2009 to airside workers at a small number of airports, including Manchester and London city airports, will have headings in English and French in line with travel document standards set by the International Civil Aviation Organisation (ICAO). This follows the practice for passports.

The Government are looking at the possibility of issuing identity cards in Wales that would in addition have headings in the Welsh language and, while it cannot be for the initial cards issued from 2009, we are exploring this for the next generation of identity cards.

Details of the cost of doing so are not yet available.

Immigration: Appeals

Chris Huhne: To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department how many and what proportion of appeals against determination by the UK Border Agency and its predecessors were successful in each of the last 10 years. [249925]

Bridget Prentice: I have been asked to reply.

The latest figures are available from the Home Office Statistical Bulletin 2007 (“Control of Immigration: Statistics United Kingdom 2007”), which was published in August 2008. This bulletin indicates that, between 1998 and 2007, (a) 874,885 appeals were lodged with the asylum and immigration tribunal, or its jurisdictional predecessors, against decisions by my right hon. Friend the Secretary of State for the Home Department and (b) 250,930 of those appeals were allowed (comprising asylum, in-country, entry clearance and other non-asylum cases). The bulletin only provides figures between the years of 1997 to 2007 as figures for 2008 are not yet available.

It should be noted that the following figures relate to immigration adjudicator/judge decisions and do not include immigration appeals tribunal decisions or asylum and immigration tribunal reconsiderations of appeals for each of the last 10 years as this information is not available in the published bulletin.


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Total determined Allowed Proportion (percentage)

1998

38,200

5,200

14

1999

28,610

7,630

27

2000

27,130

5,960

22

2001

56,815

13,335

24

2002

84,260

21,910

26

2003

108,350

29,025

26

2004

109,220

34,245

31

2005

100,250

30,440

30

2006

167,310

54,860

32

2007

154,740

48,365

31

Total

874,885

250,930

29

Notes:
1. Prior to April 2005, the figures are based on data supplied by the Presenting Officers Unit within the Home Office. From April 2005 the figures are based on information supplied by the Ministry of Justice.
2. The figures for 1997, 1999, and 2000 are rounded to the nearest 10, figures for 1998 rounded to the nearest 100, and figures for 2001 onwards are rounded to the nearest five. All percentages are calculated by the Ministry of Justice using the figures contained in the bulletin and are rounded to the nearest whole number.
3. The bulletin states that some of the figures provided for 2005 and 2006 have been revised. It also states that the figures for 2007 are provisional only.

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