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29 Jan 2009 : Column 702W—continued

Railway Stations: Crime

Mr. Burrowes: To ask the Secretary of State for Transport what assessment he has made of the effects of staff presence at rail stations on rates of (a) ticket fraud and (b) other crimes at stations. [251909]

Paul Clark: Whether and how to staff stations are primarily matters for individual operators. The Department for Transport has not therefore carried out any recent study of the effect of staffing on crime. However, the National Passenger Survey includes a question about how safe passengers feel when using stations. In the most recent survey, in autumn 2008, only 8 per cent. of those questioned were dissatisfied with station security.

Roads: Accidents

Mrs. Curtis-Thomas: To ask the Secretary of State for Transport how many road traffic accidents resulted in a fatality in Crosby constituency in each of the last five years. [253184]

Jim Fitzpatrick: The number of fatalities resulting from personal injury road accidents in Crosby constituency in each of the last five years is given in the following table:

Number of fatalities

2003

1

2004

2

2005

1

2006

4

2007

0

Note:
Based on 2004 boundaries

Andrew Stunell: To ask the Secretary of State for Transport how many people were (a) injured and (b) killed in road traffic accidents in the north-west in each of the last five years, broken down by police authority area. [253195]


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Jim Fitzpatrick: The numbers of casualties that were (a) injured and (b) killed resulting from personal injury road accidents in the north-west in each of the last five years, broken down by police authority area are given in the following table.

Number of casualties
Policy authority area

2003 2004 2005 2006 2007

Cumbria

Injured

2,641

2,685

2,685

2,421

2,373

Killed

54

57

45

59

45

Lancashire

Injured

7,413

7,749

7,937

7,908

7,650

Killed

86

58

93

63

55

Merseyside

Injured

7,406

7,312

7,243

6,426

5,737

Killed

67

62

59

45

30

Greater Manchester

Injured

14,018

13,449

12,718

11,705

10,609

Killed

126

94

87

90

93

Cheshire

Injured

6,180

5,915 67

5,481

5,205

4,838

Killed

72

67

78

64

48

North West

Injured

37,658

37,110

36,064

33,665

31,207

Killed

405

338

362

321

271


Andrew Stunell: To ask the Secretary of State for Transport how many people (a) died and (b) were injured in road accidents where the cause of the accident was drink-driving in each of the last five years, broken down by police authority. [253288]

Jim Fitzpatrick: The Department for Transport publishes estimates of the number of casualties in drink-drive accidents where one or more of the motor vehicle drivers or riders involved was over the legal alcohol limit. These estimates are calculated on a national basis. Police force area estimates are not available. Figures for Great Britain are shown in the following table.

Number of casualties

Killed Injured

2003

580

18,410

2004

580

16,400

2005

550

14,850

2006

560

13,810

2007(1)

460

14,020

(1) Provisional data. Final figures will be published in August 2008.

The drink-drive estimates are published in an article entitled “Drinking and driving” in “Road Casualties Great Britain—Annual report 2007”. Copies of the report have been deposited in the Libraries of the House and it is also available at the following web address:


29 Jan 2009 : Column 704W

Roads: Repairs and Maintenance

Mr. Oaten: To ask the Secretary of State for Transport which projects in the proposed public works schedule he proposes to bring forward as part of the programme of accelerating public works; and when he expects work on each accelerated project to begin. [251172]

Mr. Hoon [holding answer 26 January 2009]: In November 2008 the Chancellor announced, as part of his pre-Budget report, that £700 million of fiscal stimulus funding was being brought forward by the Department for Transport.

£400 million of this will be used by the Highways Agency in 2009-10 to bring forward high value schemes on the strategic roads network. This includes, subject to completing statutory processes and confirmation of co-funding from the region, bringing forward by two years the start of construction for the scheme to dual the A46 from Newark to Widmerpool. In addition the funding will allow us to bring forward work to strengthen hard shoulders in advance of the implementation of hard shoulder running as well as other high value structure and asset renewal projects.

The exact schemes that will benefit from the fiscal stimulus is being developed as part of developing the Highways Agency's 2009-10 Business Plan.

The remaining £300 million is to be used for the procurement of diesel unit rolling stock as part of the Department's High Level Output Specification for the British rail network. The first part of the procurement process has begun.

Transport: Employment

Mr. Graham Stuart: To ask the Secretary of State for Transport how many of the up to 100,000 jobs the Government expects to be created he expects will result from transport capital projects; and if he will make a statement. [251841]

Mr. Hoon: Preliminary estimates suggest that approximately 37,500 jobs will be created over the next two years as a result of expenditure of £15 billion on transport capital projects. The figures are based on the Department’s evidence base of analyses of previous capital projects.

Transport: Expenditure

Mr. Graham Stuart: To ask the Secretary of State for Transport in respect of which transport infrastructure projects with a forecast cost of more than £5 million the Highways Agency has carried out feasibility studies; how much these studies have cost; how many of the schemes subject to a feasibility study were approved; and if he will make a statement. [252060]

Paul Clark: Since being established in 1994 the Highways Agency has conducted a significant number of feasibility studies which are carried out routinely for projects that are estimated to cost in excess of £5 million. This covers all major infrastructure projects categorised into widening, bypass, junction and technology schemes, consideration of high occupancy vehicle lanes and, more recently,
29 Jan 2009 : Column 705W
managed motorway improvements. Historically the Highways Agency’s operating protocols and governance arrangements have not required discrete tracking of the costs associated with feasibility work but have been managed within overall resource budget allocations provided by central Government.

Taking into account the number of feasibility studies undertaken since 1994, the amount of work required and the need to access a large number of archived records, it has been concluded that the cost associated with identifying the cost of each study is considered disproportionate.

Environment, Food and Rural Affairs

Air Pollution

Mr. Davey: To ask the Secretary of State for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs (1) what estimate he has made of levels of (a) PM10, (b) PM2.5, (c) O3, (d) NO2 and (e) NO in each of the 20 largest cities and towns in England by population size for each year between 2005 and 2012; and if he will make a statement; [249760]

(2) which cities and towns in England are currently in breach of air quality laws on (a) nitrogen dioxide, (b) ozone and (c) other nitrogen oxides; and if he will make a statement; [249761]

(3) if he will place in the Library a copy of maps of the following air pollutants for each of the 20 largest cities and towns in England by population site showing the latest estimate he has for levels of (a) PM10, (b) PM2.5, (c) nitrogen dioxide, (d) ozone and (e) nitrogen oxide. [249782]

Huw Irranca-Davies: For the purposes of assessing and reporting exceedences and breaches of air quality limit values, the UK is divided up into 43 agglomeration zones (areas with a contiguous population of over 250,000 as specified by the air quality directives) and non-agglomeration zones. There are 23 agglomeration zones in England and eight non-agglomeration zones; the latter are based on Government office regions in England.

The air quality framework directive (1996/62/EC) and four daughter directives (1999/30/EC, 2000/69/EC, 2002/3/EC, and 2004/107/EC) set out our current obligations in relation to various pollutants in ambient air. Of the pollutants mentioned, the limit values currently in force are for particles measured as particulate matter (PM10). There are also limit values for the protection of vegetation and ecosystems for nitrogen oxides (NOx), but these specifically do not apply to urban areas, or to areas near busy roads.

The limit values for nitrogen dioxide (NO2) do not come into force until 2010. The levels set for ozone (O3) are in the form of either target values, which do not have the same strict compliance criteria as limit values, or long term objectives, which have no compliance date. Other than those for the protection of vegetation and ecosystems, there are no additional limit values for other oxides of nitrogen. A new Council directive on ambient air and cleaner air for Europe (2008/50/EC) consolidates existing legislation and introduces new controls for PM2.5. The limit values for this pollutant are not yet in force.


29 Jan 2009 : Column 706W

Under the EU legislation set out above, the UK is required to monitor the air continuously for levels of PM10, PM2.5, N02, NOx (from which levels of NO can be derived), O3 and a number of other pollutants. These data are freely available from the National Air Quality Archive

This archive contains all the monitoring data collected for and by the Government in relation to air quality since 1962. It also contains details of the monitoring sites currently in use. In addition, the UK was one of a small number of member states to report modelled data alongside monitoring data. The national model used complies with the relevant data quality criteria set out in the various air quality directives, and is validated against monitored data. The annual report complied to accompany the UK submission to the European Commission on air quality is also held on the air quality archive:

This contains maps of roadside and background levels of PM10, and NO2/NOx, although these are not given on a city by city basis; such information is not readily available. Maps for O3 are held in a separate report on the same site:


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