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12 Feb 2009 : Column 2130W—continued

Carbon Dioxide (CO 2 ) Emissions

There is limited data regarding past CO2 emissions at Heathrow airport specifically. Published emissions data from DECC are at the national level only. However, data based on fuel uplifted at Heathrow is reported—this is published in the Department for Transport’s 2009 Impact Assessment “Adding Capacity at Heathrow Airport”, where aviation carbon dioxide emissions attributable to flights departing from Heathrow in 2005 are estimated at 17.2MtCO2 or 2.9 per cent. of total UK CO2. emissions.

For future years, the Government have announced a new target to get UK aviation carbon dioxide emissions in 2050 below 2005 levels for the UK as a whole.

Once aviation joins the EU Emissions Trading Scheme (ETS) in 2012, CO2 emissions from all flights departing and arriving at airports in the EU will be capped at 97 per cent. of average 2004-06 levels, with the cap tightening to 95 per cent. of average 2004-06 levels from 2013 onwards (the cap applies at the EU level, and not at individual member state or airport levels). Any aviation emissions above this cap will need to be accounted for by airlines securing reductions from other sectors within the EU ETS. So any change in the capacity of Heathrow in future years will not lead to any net increase in CO2 emissions.

Other Greenhouse Gas Emissions

Other greenhouse gas emissions are not currently reported specifically for Heathrow airport.

Heathrow Airport: Road Traffic

Mrs. Villiers: To ask the Secretary of State for Transport what estimate he has made of the additional road vehicle movements which would result from (a) an increase from 67 to 122 million passengers a year and (b) an increase of 125,000 flight movements a year at Heathrow Airport. [252660]

Jim Fitzpatrick: Forecasts of surface access demand at Heathrow are set out in BAA's ‘Surface Access Report’, published alongside the ‘Adding Capacity at Heathrow Airport’ consultation document. This is available at the following link:

The figure of 122 million passengers assumes around 702,000 flights a year in 2030, whereas we are initially supporting a maximum of 605,000 (an additional 125,000 a year). The additional number of passengers accessing the airport by road is therefore expected to be around 14 million, around half the number previously assumed.


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Norman Baker: To ask the Secretary of State for Transport what estimate his Department has made of the number of additional car journeys per day which will result from the establishment of a third runway at Heathrow, broken down by major road. [253936]

Jim Fitzpatrick: Forecasts of surface access demand at Heathrow are set out in BAA’s ‘Surface Access Report’, published alongside the 2007 ‘Adding Capacity at Heathrow
12 Feb 2009 : Column 2132W
Airport’ consultation document. This is available on the Department’s website at the following link:

Table 36 reproduced below shows the daily traffic composition for the main road corridors (A4, M4 and M25) with a third runway in 2020 and 605,000 air transport movements a year, which is the limit we are supporting initially.

Table 36: Traffic composition at air quality hotspots for the R3/T6 core scenario in 2020
Percentage
Air quality hotspot Road Map r ef Car: air passengers Cars: business Cars: non business Light goods v ehicles Heavy goods v ehicles Buses Annual average daily traffic

A4 corridor

Northern perimeter road (E of Spur)

1

4

14

32

7

3

40

5,900

A4 (E of Spur)

2

1

7

73

10

6

2

31,800

M4 corridor

A312 S of M4

3

6

5

59

22

8

1

60,700

M4 Spur

4

78

2

15

2

2

2

99,800

M4 J4b-5

5

8

12

63

8

8

0

165,300

M4 J4-4b

6

36

6

45

6

8

0

164,400

M4 J3-4

7

27

7

51

8

8

0

147,800

M4 J 2-3

8

35

7

46

8

5

1

103,800

M25 corridor

M25 J13-14

9

12

12

61

8

7

0

224,600

M25 J14-T5 Spur

10

8

14

62

8

8

0

174,100

M25 T5 Spur-J15

11

21

12

53

7

7

0

236,800

M25 J15-16

12

21

12

51

7

9

0

210,400


Passenger Focus

Sir John Stanley: To ask the Secretary of State for Transport what the cost to the public purse was of Passenger Focus in the latest 12 months for which figures are available. [256560]

Paul Clark: The total cost of Passenger Focus to the public purse in 2007-08 was £5.315 million.

Railways: Bus Services

Mrs. Villiers: To ask the Secretary of State for Transport how much his Department has spent on rail replacement bus services in each of the last 10 years. [247301]

Paul Clark: The information is not held by the Department for Transport and could be obtained only at disproportionate cost.

Railways: Employment

Stephen Hammond: To ask the Secretary of State for Transport whether he has had any discussions with train operators about the effect on their businesses of a reduction in (a) UK GDP and (b) Central London employment levels. [256007]

Paul Clark: There are regular meetings with all operators to discuss all aspects of their performance. These discussions include, where appropriate, the impacts of UK GDP and central London employment levels on revenues.

Railways: Fares

Stephen Hammond: To ask the Secretary of State for Transport whether the RP plus one per cent. formula for regulated fares may result in a negative number. [256015]

Paul Clark: Yes, the RPI plus 1 formula for regulated fares may result in a negative number.

Railways: Franchises

Stephen Hammond: To ask the Secretary of State for Transport what assumptions about (a) economic growth and (b) passenger volumes were made in the franchise agreements for the (i) East Coast Main Line, (ii) East Midlands, (iii) South West Trains, (iv) South Eastern and (v) East Anglian franchises. [255979]

Paul Clark: The information requested is commercially confidential between the Department for Transport and the respective train operators.

Railways: Snow and Ice

Mr. Burstow: To ask the Secretary of State for Transport what assessment he has made of the adequacy of contingency plans made by Network Rail and train operating companies to minimise disruption to rail
12 Feb 2009 : Column 2133W
services caused by severe weather events; when he next plans to review the implementation of those plans; and if he will make a statement. [255375]

Paul Clark: The handling of major disruptions to rail services is reviewed in detail by the industry to see what can be learned for the future. Ministers meet senior representatives of the industry regularly to discuss rail performance.

The Department for Transport will encourage the industry to implement any improvements to contingency planning which are identified following the recent bad weather.

Shipping: Carbon Emissions

Gregory Barker: To ask the Secretary of State for Transport what the Government's policy is on the development of a global emissions trading scheme for shipping under the auspices of the International Maritime Organization. [255177]

Jim Fitzpatrick: The Government are clear that shipping emissions must be tackled and that the shipping sector must operate under carbon limits. We believe that a coordinated multilateral maritime carbon emissions trading system is the best option for delivering cost-effective reductions while maintaining a thriving shipping sector.

The Government actively support the development of such a scheme under the auspices of the International Maritime Organization. If this proves impossible we would support inclusion of maritime emissions in the EU Emissions Trading Scheme. However, because of the world-wide nature of the shipping industry, the Government believe that any action by the EU should be seen as a stepping stone to future global agreements on international shipping emissions.

We are working with industry and our European partners to develop further the maritime emissions trading concept.

Taxis: Disabled People

Bob Spink: To ask the Secretary of State for Transport what assessment he has made of progress on implementation of new regulations covering access to taxis for people with disabilities. [255783]

Paul Clark: The Department for Transport published a consultation document about improving access to taxis on 2 February and this consultation will run for the statutory 12-week period. The consultation looks at ways to make taxi services more accessible to disabled people. We will consider in detail the responses to the consultation to inform the way forward.


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