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12 Feb 2009 : Column 2165W—continued

Cancer: Coventry

Mr. Jim Cunningham: To ask the Secretary of State for Health what recent steps the Government has taken to improve provision of the cancer services in Coventry. [255354]

Ann Keen: The Cancer Reform Strategy, published in December 2007, sets out guidance to the local national health service on how to improve cancer prevention, speed up the diagnosis and treatment of cancer, reduce inequalities, improve the experience of people living with and beyond cancer, ensure care is delivered in the most appropriate settings and ensure patients can access effective new treatments quickly. A copy of the strategy has already been placed in the Library. It is for primary care trusts (PCTs) to use the funds made available to them and work in partnership with strategic health authorities, local services, cancer networks and other local stakeholders to deliver these aims. Information on the work being done in the Coventry area can be obtained direct from Coventry Teaching PCT.

Through the Cancer Reform Strategy’s National Awareness and Early Diagnosis Initiative, the Department, in partnership with Cancer Research UK, is co-ordinating a programme to support local interventions to increase cancer symptom awareness, and encourage people to seek help early.

Cardiovascular System: Screening

Norman Lamb: To ask the Secretary of State for Health (1) what plans his Department has to extend the vascular checks programme beyond GP surgeries; [255744]

(2) what assessment he has made of the merits of carrying out vascular risk assessments and measurements in the workplace as part of the health, work and well-being strategy; [255746]


12 Feb 2009 : Column 2166W

(3) in what setting vascular risk assessments and measurements will be provided for people between the ages of 40 and 74 years. [256014]

Ann Keen: The vascular checks programme has been designed to be undertaken in a variety of settings to ensure that those who are not regularly in touch with formal health care can access the programme. Primary care trusts will commission the programme to reflect the needs of their population and how they access services. Primary care trusts may, therefore, commission the service from general practitioners, pharmacies or other providers which their target group access. This could include running the programme in a workplace setting.

Norman Lamb: To ask the Secretary of State for Health how people aged between 40 and 74 years old will be notified that they are eligible for vascular risk assessments and measurements. [255745]

Ann Keen: As part of preparing primary care trusts for implementation, the Department will make available a standard invitation letter and leaflet about the vascular checks programme. Until the national call and recall system is developed, primary care trusts will decide locally who and how to call people first. Current vascular checks type activity across the country suggests that for some populations other methods of invitation e.g. through telephone calls generate a better take up. Working through NHS Improvement, we are making available learning on this and other aspects of the programme across the country. Once the call and recall system is developed, people will recalled every five years for their check.

Norman Lamb: To ask the Secretary of State for Health (1) what steps his Department plans to take to measure the level of uptake of vascular risk assessment and measurements amongst people between the ages of 40 to 74 years; [255747]

(2) whether all primary care trusts in England will be required to implement the vascular checks programme from 1 April 2009. [256013]

Ann Keen: Many primary care trusts, especially in spearhead areas, already have vascular checks type programmes in place. The implementation of the vascular checks programme will be phased during 2009-10. All primary care trusts will be expected to have undertaken some activity to support the programme during this period. We are working with strategic health authorities to ensure all primary care trusts implement the programme. We are developing an evaluation strategy that will provide information on the rate and mode of implementation. As part of the evaluation, we will look at uptake amongst groups less likely to participate in the programme and those particularly likely to benefit since they are inherently likely to be at higher risk. These groups will vary from primary care trusts to primary care trusts.

Norman Lamb: To ask the Secretary of State for Health (1) what steps his Department is taking in the implementation of the vascular checks programme (a) to ensure that hard-to-reach groups receive checks and (b) to evaluate uptake among these groups; [255748]


12 Feb 2009 : Column 2167W

(2) what role the vascular checks programme will have in reducing health inequalities; and if he will make a statement. [256012]

Ann Keen: The vascular checks programme has the potential to reduce health inequalities and has been designed to form part of the Department's overall programme for tackling them. The assessment element of the programme has been designed to be undertaken in a variety of settings to help to ensure that everyone who is eligible can access the programme. In November 2008 the Department issued guidance to primary care trusts Next Steps' guidance for Primary Care Trusts which underlines the need for them to commission a programme that tackles and reduces health inequalities. A copy of the guidance has been placed in the Library.

Care Homes: Fees and Charges

Mr. Waterson: To ask the Secretary of State for Health what percentage of care home residents were asked to pay a top-up fee in (a) Eastbourne, (b) East Sussex and (c) England in each year since 2004. [257202]

Phil Hope: Information about top-up fees is not collected centrally. However, according to the Office of Fair Trading report, “Survey of Older People in Care
12 Feb 2009 : Column 2168W
Homes”, published in May 2005, 33 per cent. of the 382 United Kingdom local authority funded residents interviewed said part of their fees were paid as a third party contribution or top-up.

Care Homes: Standards

Mr. Lansley: To ask the Secretary of State for Health how many and what percentage of care homes did not meet each of the National Minimum Standards for care homes in the year ended 31 March 2008. [255595]

Phil Hope: I am informed by the Commission for Social Care Inspection (CSCI) that its inspectors assess the performance of care homes against each national minimum standard (NMS) and rate them on a four-point scale. A score of 4 indicates that a standard has been exceeded. A score of 3 shows that it has been met. A score of 2 denotes that the standard has not been met with minor shortfalls—this indicates that one of the numerous subsections in the standard has not been completely met. A score of 1 means the standard has not been met.

The following tables show the scores of care homes against the NMS for care homes for younger adults and older people, broken down by number and percentage, for the year ending 31 March 2008.


12 Feb 2009 : Column 2169W

12 Feb 2009 : Column 2170W
Scores against NMS for care homes for younger adults as at 31 March 2008( 1)
Score1 Standard not met Score-2 Standard not met with minor shortfalls Score-3 Standard met Score-4 Standard exceeded
NMS heading Number Percentage Number Percentage Number Percentage Number Percentage

Information

123

2

1,403

20

5,125

73

349

5

Needs assessment

73

1

567

8

6,175

83

668

9

Meeting needs

139

2

599

9

5,487

84

297

5

Introductory visits

35

1

200

3

5,985

91

359

5

Contract

195

3

1,161

17

5,148

78

131

2

Service user plan

162

2

1,716

23

4,567

61

1,074

14

Decision making

57

1

614

8

5,939

79

907

12

Participation

55

1

533

8

5,436

83

505

8

Risk taking

116

2

1,160

15

5,561

74

677

9

Confidentiality

53

1

507

8

5,633

90

96

2

Personal development

62

1

420

6

5,337

82

682

10

Education and occupation

40

1

567

8

5,670

75

1,234

16

Community links and social inclusion

45

1

491

7

5,915

79

1,064

14

Leisure

72

1

676

10

5,145

75

948

14

Relationships

4

0

158

2

6,560

87

782

10

Daily routines

38

1

382

5

6,186

82

895

12

Meals and mealtimes

43

1

564

8

6,167

82

733

10

Personal support

43

1

451

6

6,155

82

868

12

Healthcare

55

1

711

9

5,898

78

856

11

Medication

160

2

1,865

25

5,193

69

299

4

Ageing and death

76

1

686

12

4,901

83

259

4

Concerns and complaints

31

0

701

9

6,427

85

367

5

Protection

146

2

1,229

16

5,839

78

312

4

Premises

207

3

1,947

26

4,714

63

669

9

Space requirements

55

1

456

7

5,748

87

381

6

Furniture and fittings

84

1

878

13

5,355

80

336

5

Toilets and bathrooms

170

3

1,072

16

5,123

77

266

4

Shared space

74

1

733

11

5,469

83

338

5

Adaptations and equipment

92

1

616

10

5,255

85

189

3

Hygeine and control of infection

68

1

841

11

6,161

82

462

6

Roles

78

1

459

7

5,621

90

120

2

Qualities and qualifications

79

1

1,109

15

5,486

73

796

11

Staff team

228

3

1,373

20

4,951

72

289

4

Recruitment

257

3

1,288

17

5,567

75

340

5

Training and development

130

2

1,470

20

5,239

70

624

8

Supervision and support

179

3

1,211

18

5,046

75

312

5

Day to day operations

152

2

1,273

17

5,231

70

863

11

Ethos

109

2

434

7

5,176

81

679

11

Quality assurance

177

2

1,657

22

5,061

67

603

8

Policies and procedures

106

2

1,193

19

4,891

78

87

1

Record keeping

223

3

1,629

26

4,423

69

103

2

Safe working practices

182

2

1,843

25

5,185

69

302

4

Conduct of the service

182

3

964

16

4,783

80

70

1

(1) Data shown are for care homes which were active at 31 March 2008 and had been inspected against the NMS for care homes for younger adults at some point prior.
Note:
Percentage scores are rounded to the nearest whole percentage point.
Source:
CSCI database.

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