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Additionally, Bulgarian and Romanian nationals who work illegally commit a criminal offence and may be served with a fixed penalty fine of £1,000 under criminal law.

Part II of the Immigration and Asylum Act 1999 enables the Secretary of State to impose a £2,000 fixed charge on any air or sea carrier for each non-European Economic Area passenger they bring to the UK who fails to produce, on request, a valid travel document satisfactorily establishing their identity and nationality and, if required, a valid visa.

The Department can also impose a civil penalty on those responsible for carrying clandestine entrants. The maximum penalty is £2,000 per clandestine and the aggregated maximum per clandestine (applied where more than one person is responsible) is £4,000.

The UK Borders Act 2007 enables the Secretary of State to make regulations requiring foreign nationals who are subject to immigration control to apply for an Identity Card for Foreign Nationals. Failure to comply with such a requirement may result in the imposition of a sanction, which may include a civil financial penalty up to a maximum of £1,000.

The police forces in England and Wales have the power to issue fixed penalty notices as a sanction against a specified list of offences, mainly related to public order (Penalty Notices for Disorder) and motoring.

For the Department's agencies, no penalties are levied.

Genetics: Databases

Lady Hermon: To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department how many people resident in Northern Ireland have details registered on the National DNA Database. [254270]

Mr. Alan Campbell: The number of subject profiles on the National DNA Database (NDNAD) submitted by the Police Service of Northern Ireland (PSNI) was 65,082 as at 3 February 2009.

The NDNAD does not hold any information on the place of residence of a person whose DNA is sampled. This figure therefore includes residents of areas other than Northern Ireland who were sampled by the PSNI, and excludes residents of Northern Ireland who were sampled by other police forces.

The number of profiles held on the NDNAD is not the same as the number of individuals. As it is possible for a profile to be loaded onto the NDNAD on more than one occasion, some profiles held on the NDNAD are replicates. This can occur if, for example, a person provided different names, or different versions of their name, when arrested on different occasions. At present, the average replication rate on the whole NDNAD is estimated to be 13.3 per cent. However, this figure may vary between police forces.

Mr. Greg Knight: To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department pursuant to the answer of 13 January 2009, Official Report, column 710W, on genetics: database, what steps she plans to take to comply with the S and Harper judgment in relation to retention of DNA information from people not convicted of a crime. [255016]


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Mr. Alan Campbell: I refer to the reply I gave to the hon. Member for Pendle (Mr. Prentice) on 29 January 2009, Official Report, column 809W.

Human Trafficking: Females

Mr. Sharma: To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department what recent steps she has taken to reduce levels of trafficking of women for sexual exploitation. [255431]

Mr. Alan Campbell: We continue to make good progress towards the 85 action points contained in our Action Plan to combat trafficking and we shall publish the annual update to this plan later in the year.

On 17 December 2008, the UK ratified Council of Europe convention on trafficking in human beings. This represents a major milestone in the fight against human trafficking.

We have introduced proposed legislative changes under the Policing and Crime Bill to make it an offence to purchase sex from a woman controlled for gain or who has been trafficked, as part of our strategy to reduce demand for trafficked women.

In addition to this, the Serious Organised Crime Agency has programmes of activity to combat organised immigration crime including human trafficking focusing on source and transit countries and trafficking into and within the UK.

Identity Cards

Lynne Jones: To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department what categories of person required to apply for identity cards are required to obtain certification of any criminal convictions. [258103]

Meg Hillier: The Identity Cards Act 2006 establishes the concept of a designated document. When an individual applies for a designated document they will also be required to apply for an identity card.

Secondary legislation, due to come before Parliament shortly, proposes the designation of criminal conviction certificates that have been applied for by airside workers who would be expected to produce the criminal conviction certificate before they were issued with an airside pass.

The draft secondary legislation is included in the Identity Cards Act Secondary Legislation consultation document which is available at:

I would refer the hon. Member to that document.

Lynne Jones: To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department what steps she plans to take to encourage the voluntary uptake of identity cards by British nationals in pilot areas. [258106]

Meg Hillier: It was announced in November that we wanted to find a way to give members of the public who already see the benefits of ID cards a chance to get one this year.

The Identity and Passport Service have been working hard to make this happen and will launch a website on DirectGov in the next few months. The site will give the
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public a wealth of information about how to best prove and protect their identity, as well as keeping people updated about how they can apply for an identity card.

Further work to publicise identity cards is being planned.

Lynne Jones: To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department what estimate she has made of the number of non-enrolment biometric checks against (a) an identity card and (b) the National Identity Register which will be made during the lifetime of the temporary register. [258107]

Meg Hillier: When we begin to issue identity cards from the second half of this year we will issue real identity cards backed up by the National Identity Register. This will not be a temporary register.

The early rollout stages of the national identity scheme will involve a limited number of individuals and so we would expect that initially very few biometric checks will be made.

Illegal Immigrants: Deportation

Mr. Carswell: To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department what proportion of the 3,300 illegal immigrants identified by the UK Border Agency between April and November 2008 have been removed from the UK. [256430]

Mr. Woolas: Published information on removals is provided in the quarterly asylum statistics. These are available in the Library of the House, and can also be accessed at:

Immigrants: Crime

Chris Grayling: To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department how many recorded crimes have been committed by people with indefinite leave to remain in each of the last three years. [254820]

Jacqui Smith: The information requested is not available from the police recorded crime statistics collected by the Home Office. The series collects statistics on the number of offences recorded but no information is collected on the status of the alleged offender.

Immigration: Peterborough

Mr. Stewart Jackson: To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department pursuant to the answer of 27 January 2009, Official Report, column 283W, on deportation: Peterborough, what fixed datasets are used by the case information database to identify (a) individual names, (b) individual postal addresses and (c) other data; and if she will make a statement. [253646]

Mr. Woolas [holding answer 3 February 2009]: The case information database uses datasets covering people’s biometric and biographical data to uniquely establish individual identity and a table of addresses using the post office address finder software, table of address links to specific individuals and a further table which describe why the link is in place. These tables help to check that address data are accurate and up to date as
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possible and reduce the likelihood of errors throughout the individual journey in the immigration process including deportation information.

The case information database stores multiple addresses against an applicant for a variety of different uses including correspondence, prison, place of abode, etc. These are then stored either in elements including house name, street name, county etc. or in one block if the address can not be verified against the post office finder software.

Information on any other data needs to be specific to aid response.

Licensing Act 2003

Mr. Amess: To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department what assessment she has made of the effect of the implementation of the Licensing Act 2003 on shift patterns of police officers in (a) Essex and (b) England and Wales. [254993]

Mr. Alan Campbell: The shift patterns of police officers is an operational matter, and as such is for the chief constable to determine. However, the Government published a review of the Licensing Act 2003 in March 2008 which revealed a mixed picture in terms of its impact. The change in opening hours has not led to the widespread problems some people feared. Overall, crime and alcohol consumption are down, but there has been a small increase in alcohol-related violence in the early hours of the morning and some communities have seen a rise in disorder. Our main conclusion is that people are using the freedoms, but people are not sufficiently using the considerable powers granted by the Act to tackle problems, and that there is a need to rebalance action towards enforcement and crack down on irresponsible behaviour.

Additionally, we have introduced legislation for a new, mandatory code of practice. This will contain some compulsory national conditions, banning the most irresponsible practices and promotions which encourage people to drink excessively, or promote a binge-drinking culture. This will not affect the majority of businesses, small or large, that behave responsibly—but will target those that do not.

Further, the Government are funding a £4.5 million enforcement campaign, in addition to existing resources from the police, local authorities, and others, focused on 40-50 priority areas and led by ACPO Commander Simon O’Brien. There is additional funding for the 20 priority PCT areas, and a £10 million investment in national awareness campaigns.

Members: Correspondence

Chris Huhne: To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department when she plans to answer Question 243530, on fees for identity cards and biometric passports, tabled on 9 December 2008. [250487]

Jacqui Smith [holding answer 27 January 2009]: I replied to the hon. Member on 9 February 2009, Official Report, column 1672W.

Sir Gerald Kaufman: To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department when she plans to reply to the letter of 29 October 2008 from the right hon. Member for Manchester, Gorton with regard to Ms S. Umak. [250859]


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Jacqui Smith: I wrote to my right hon. Friend on 21 January 2009.

Clare Short: To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department when she expects a reply to be sent to the letter of 8 January 2009 from the hon. Member for Birmingham, Ladywood, to the UK Border Agency regarding Sainey Manneh, Home Office reference number M1300980/3, acknowledgement reference B463/9. [257521]

Mr. Woolas: The UK Border Agency wrote to my right hon. Friend on 27 January 2009.

Mentally Disturbed Offenders

Mrs. Moon: To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department how many (a) young offenders, (b) young people and (c) adults detained by the police were diverted into treatment for a mental disorder in each police force area in each year since 2000. [250938]

Mr. Alan Campbell: The information is not held centrally.

National Identity Register

Lynne Jones: To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department (1) whether the biographical component of the National Identity Register will be held on the Department for Work and Pensions customer information systems; and what other legacy systems will be linked to it; [258111]

(2) what measures the Identity and Passport Service plans to put in place to prevent officials from the Department for Work and Pensions from accessing its information held on the National Identity Register. [258113]

Meg Hillier: In order to maintain a necessarily high level of security, the National Identity Register will not be directly linked to any other Government databases and no third party organisation will have direct access to the information held on the register.

Our suppliers are currently building the system that will store the biographic information that will be enrolled when we begin issuing identity cards from the second half of this year.

Lynne Jones: To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department what estimate she has made of the cost to other Departments of (a) making and (b) servicing individual verifications of their data held on the National Identity Register. [258114]

Meg Hillier: Government Departments already require individuals to provide proof of identity in order to access many services. Identity cards will be more convenient and secure than the array of documents that are currently used to prove identity, thus making the process more efficient from the very beginning.

Linked to the National Identity Register, identity cards will provide a range of levels of identity verification the majority of which will be a basic visual check of the card and not all transactions will require a check against the Register.


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It will be the responsibility of any Government Department to decide what level of identity verification they require and if they wish to invest in equipment, such as card readers, or identity verification services provided by the Identity and Passport Service.

National Identity Register: Data Protection

Lynne Jones: To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department whether requests from other Departments for information held on the National Identity Register will be restricted to requests for confirmation or denial of data held. [258109]

Meg Hillier: The information that is provided to other Government Departments from the National Identity Register will vary depending on the purpose for which the Department makes the request. The majority of requests will be to confirm the validity of data held by the Department. In limited cases however, further information may be provided, such as in the prevention and detection of crime.

All requests will be subject to the strict regulations laid out in the Identity Cards Act and forthcoming secondary legislation. Furthermore, all disclosures will comply with the Data Protection and Human Rights Acts.

Lynne Jones: To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department what forms of access control her Department proposes to use to keep data on the National Identity Register gathered from the information systems of other Departments separate. [258112]

Meg Hillier: The information that will be held on the National Identity Register will be collected during the application process. It will not be made up of an amalgam of existing Government data.

Lynne Jones: To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department what steps the Identity and Passport Service plans to take to shield information for which it is responsible following delivery to systems held by other Departments. [258116]

Meg Hillier: Before an organisation may be provided with information from the National Identity Register it will undergo an accreditation process which will include ensuring there is a legitimate business need for the information and that the organisation will be responsible for ensuring that information it is provided with is handled in accordance with the Data Protection Act.

In addition, under the Identity Cards Act, it will be a criminal offence to make any unauthorised disclosure of information from the National Identity Register. Accreditation may be withdrawn if an organisation fails to comply with any requirements to look after the information and the National Identity Scheme Commissioner will provide independent oversight of the provision of information.


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