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18 Mar 2009 : Column 1162W—continued


Drugs: Crime Prevention

Mr. Ruffley: To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department how many closure orders have been made in respect of premises (a) where Class A drugs are used unlawfully and (b) associated with persistent disorder or nuisance in each police force area in England and Wales in each year since 2003. [263528]

Mr. Alan Campbell: The Anti-social Behaviour Act 2003 introduced the power for courts to issue orders for the closure of premises where Class A drugs and serious nuisance and disorder are a problem. The provision commenced on 20 January 2004. Data on the number of closure orders made in respect of premises where Class A drugs are used unlawfully are collected by the Home Office through voluntary Crime and Disorder Reduction Partnership (CDRP) survey of antisocial behaviour tools and powers. Information on closure orders where Class A drugs are used unlawfully is not available in the format requested. However, information published in May 2008 and covering the period October 2003 to September 2007 is shown in the following table.

The power for the courts to close, on a temporary basis, premises associated with significant and persistent disorder or persistent serious nuisance was introduced by the Criminal Justice and Immigration Act 2008. This new power commenced on 1 December 2008. Data on closure of premises associated with persistent disorder or nuisance order are not available.


18 Mar 2009 : Column 1163W

18 Mar 2009 : Column 1164W
CDRP Survey not including ASBO statistics, from October 2003 up to September 2007
Police force/CJS Government office region Crack house made

Bedfordshire

East

4

Cambridgeshire

East

10

Essex

East

7

Hertfordshire

East

14

Norfolk

East

4

Suffolk

East

9

East total

48

Derbyshire

East Midlands

13

Leicestershire

East Midlands

10

Lincolnshire

East Midlands

3

Northamptonshire

East Midlands

15

Nottinghamshire

East Midlands

33

East Midlands total

74

Greater London (Met and City of London)

London

400

London Total

400

Cleveland

North East

46

Durham

North East

6

Northumbria

North East

4

North East total

56

Cheshire

North West

11

Cumbria

North West

8

Greater Manchester

North West

30

Lancashire

North West

49

Merseyside

North West

22

North West total

120

Hampshire

South East

79

Kent

South East

16

Surrey

South East

2

Sussex

South East

10

Thames Valley

South East

16

South East total

123

Avon and Somerset

South West

68

Devon and Cornwall

South West

24

Dorset

South West

23

Gloucestershire

South West

6

Wiltshire

South West

5

South West total

126

Dyfed-Powys

Wales

0

Gwent

Wales

2

North Wales

Wales

9

South Wales

Wales

3

Wales total

14

Staffordshire

West Midlands

6

Warwickshire

West Midlands

1

West Mercia

West Midlands

0

West Midlands

West Midlands

55

West Midlands Total

62

Humberside

Yorkshire and Humberside

20

North Yorkshire

Yorkshire and Humberside

0

South Yorkshire

Yorkshire and Humberside

28

West Yorkshire

Yorkshire and Humberside

80

Yorkshire and Humberside total

128

National total

1,151


Forensic Science

Chris Grayling: To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department (1) what the minimum required level of (a) professional and clinical qualification and (b) practical training is for (i) nurses, (ii) doctors and (iii) other healthcare professionals employed by police forces to provide forensic medical services; what duties are performed by staff at each level in each professional role; what steps are taken to ensure that staff recruited to provide these services are available to give evidence in court when required; and what powers police forces have to (A) make and (B) vary requirements for forensic medical staff; [262774]

(2) what guidance her Department has issued on required levels of qualifications and training for healthcare staff employed in the delivery of forensic medical services to police forces and HM Courts Service. [262775]

Jacqui Smith: Guidance as to the level of professional and clinical qualification required for doctors or nurses is issued by the Faculty of Forensic and Legal Medicine (FFLM), which is part of the Royal College of Physicians.

Responsibility for recruitment of healthcare professionals is a matter for individual chief police officers, and it is for each police force to make a decision on an individual basis against this guidance.

The National Policing Improvement Agency (NPIA) recommends that students attending the Introductory Course in Clinical Forensic Medicine have the following experience:

The FFLM will have an opinion as to what duties should, or should not, be performed by staff at each level in each professional role. There is no mandatory guidance from the police service.

The availability of health care staff to give evidence in court is a matter for individual police forces.

NPIA Forensic Centre provides an introductory course for forensic physicians and health care professionals. Such training is not mandatory. All police forces in England and Wales and custody health care providers are aware of the training, together with the Association of Chief Police Officers and the forensic regulator.

Former Ministers: Security

Mr. Rob Wilson: To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department how many former Ministers receive police protection. [262768]


18 Mar 2009 : Column 1165W

Mr. Coaker: I refer the hon. Member to the answer given on 5 March 2009, Official Report , column 1779W.

Fraud: Banks

Mr. Vaizey: To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department what recent steps she has taken to increase levels of detection of fraud in relation to retail banks. [264228]

Mr. Alan Campbell [holding answer 17 March 2009]: Banks may report incidents of fraud to the police who will take a decision about the appropriate response.

In response to the recent cross Whitehall review of fraud, the Government and Corporation of London have allocated additional funding to the City of London police to enable the force to take a national lead in the investigation of serious and organised fraud. The force is also establishing a centre of excellence which will assist other forces in their response to fraud by providing training and best practice. Additional money has also been made available to establish a national fraud reporting centre which will equip law enforcement agencies with a powerful intelligence tool and help form the basis of better prevention advice and alerts to fraud threats for business and the public.

Master Locksmiths’ Association

Chris Huhne: To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department for what reasons she did not invite representatives of the Master Locksmiths' Association to her recent burglary summit. [261907]

Jacqui Smith: Invitees to the burglary summit held on 4 February were intended to provide as wide a representation of stakeholders as possible across the public, private and voluntary sectors, within the constraints of the venue. The security industry was represented in the first instance by the British Security Industry Association, as they have a wide reach through the industry, but the Home Office recognises that Master Locksmiths’ Association has a very valuable role to play.

The summit was the first event in an ongoing programme of work, and the Home Office is developing the ideas that emerged from that meeting, involving a wider range of partners. Since the summit, a number of companies and industry bodies have contacted officials expressing a willingness to support the real help for people in hard times work. The support of the Master Locksmith's Association is most welcome; they have been contacted by Home Office officials and will be included in relevant aspects of this work as it progresses.


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