Previous Section Index Home Page

7 May 2009 : Column 344W—continued


7 May 2009 : Column 345W

Pharmacy

Sandra Gidley: To ask the Secretary of State for Health what mechanisms his Department plans to put in place to ensure that primary care trusts considering a new pharmacy application take account of competition and choice, as referred to in the Pharmacy White Paper; and if he will make a statement. [272697]

Phil Hope: Subject to parliamentary approval, clause 24 of the Health Bill amends the NHS Act 2006 to replace the current market entry test so that primary care trusts (PCTs) will in future determine whether a new prospective provider will be admitted to a PCT’s pharmaceutical list (or an existing listing can be amended) by reference to and determined against its pharmaceutical needs assessment. Regulations will in due course set out the detailed requirements of what must be contained in those assessments and may also prescribe matters which a PCT must consider when making a decision on an application.

When we consulted on these measures last autumn in “Pharmacy in England: Building on strengths—delivering the future—proposals for legislative change”, a copy of which has already been placed in the Library, we proposed to carry forward a number of factors introduced in the 2005 regulations, which help PCTs reach their decisions. These factors include the choice and diversity of providers or of services.

We expect to work closely with stakeholders and will take account of observations in a recent court appeal case when drafting these regulations.

Mr. Laurence Robertson: To ask the Secretary of State for Health what opportunities pharmacists working in (a) academia, (b) industry and (c) other areas, other than general practice, will have to register with the General Pharmacy Council under his Department's proposals for a draft Pharmacy Order 2009; whether his Department's proposals will allow retired pharmacists to be able to describe themselves as such; and if he will make a statement. [273141]

Phil Hope: Ministers will shortly be publishing the formal response to the consultation on the draft Pharmacy Order 2009, which will include registration criteria for all pharmacists in Great Britain. There is nothing in the draft Pharmacy Order 2009 that would prevent a person from describing themselves as a "retired pharmacist".

Pregnancy: Health Education

Mr. Kidney: To ask the Secretary of State for Health if he will ensure that the Change 4 Life public awareness campaign includes information for young women about the importance of health and well-being before pregnancy with regard to (a) diet, (b) optimal body weight, (c) smoking and (d) alcohol consumption. [271753]

Dawn Primarolo: The Change4Life campaign seeks to address the rising tide of obesity in England through marketing communications about diet and activity that address the target groups of families having at least one child under the age of 11. The priority groups for 2009-10 include pregnant women, families with children under the age of two, and ‘at risk’ families, those whose current behaviours and/or attitudes suggest that their children are most at risk of weight gain.


7 May 2009 : Column 346W

Change4Life currently provides information about diet and activity-related behaviours only (not smoking or alcohol consumption), and as this is a prevention campaign, it focuses on how these behaviours relate to children, i.e. what and how children eat, and how much they are physically active. The Change4Life campaign does not, therefore, currently target adults about their own diet and activity behaviours, rather it targets adults who are parents, about their children. It does not currently target adults who do not have children, or those planning a pregnancy.

However, the Department will consider the feasibility of communicating to those planning a pregnancy when it develops plans for a pregnancy-specific strand of the Change4Life campaign later this year.

With regards to tobacco and alcohol, there have been campaigns this year that have targeted pregnant women, as follows:

Smoking

Alcohol consumption

Sexually Transmitted Diseases

Mr. Lansley: To ask the Secretary of State for Health how many people were admitted to hospital for the treatment of sexually transmitted infections (a) in each region in each year since 1997-98 and (b) in each primary care trust area in the last year for which figures are available. [272788]

Dawn Primarolo: We are unable to provide a breakdown by primary care trust of residence due to the sensitivity of the data. The count of admissions to hospital for sexually transmitted infections (STIs) broken down by strategic health authority of residence for 1997-98 to 2007-08 is provided in the following table. These data only include admissions to hospital and do not include attendances at genito-urinary medicine clinics, where the majority of STIs are detected and treated.


7 May 2009 : Column 347W

7 May 2009 : Column 348W

7 May 2009 : Column 349W

7 May 2009 : Column 350W
Number of admissions to hospital for sexually transmitted infections broken down by strategic health authority (SHA) of residence for 1997-98 to 2007-08, activity in English NHS Hospitals and English NHS commissioned activity in the independent sector

Current s trategic HA of residence 2007-08 2006-07 2005-06 2004-05 2003-04 2002-03 2001-02 2000-01 1999-2000 1998-99 1997-98

Total

2,649

2,620

2,818

2,678

2,741

2,744

2,840

3,193

3,447

3,297

3,527

Q01

Norfolk, Suffolk and Cambridgeshire Strategic HA

104

77

65

64

64

72

53

79

90

Q02

Bedfordshire and Hertfordshire Strategic HA

59

61

54

73

55

68

71

60

50

Q03

Essex Strategic HA

58

55

89

35

36

36

39

63

47

Q04

North West London Strategic HA

107

95

105

96

57

63

72

72

121

Q05

North Central London Strategic HA

120

79

97

88

48

61

73

60

59

Q06

North East London Strategic HA

112

108

146

58

12

132

190

134

35

Q07

South East London Strategic HA

111

125

105

115

73

101

82

88

84

Q08

South West London Strategic HA

71

74

62

63

64

45

49

58

70

Q09

Northumberland, Tyne and Wear Strategic HA

113

100

86

86

92

121

128

158

131

Q10

County Durham and Tees Valley Strategic HA

76

73

73

91

74

50

58

122

117

Q11

North and East Yorkshire and Northern Lincolnshire Strategic HA

56

90

105

67

88

89

115

135

95

Q12

West Yorkshire Strategic HA

122

123

82

76

117

169

161

149

224

Q13

Cumbria and Lancashire Strategic HA

130

137

118

118

104

128

174

214

294

Q14

Greater Manchester Strategic HA

158

177

166

128

173

301

414

311

342

Q15

Cheshire and Merseyside Strategic HA

109

89

146

99

127

134

119

78

79

Q16

Thames Valley Strategic HA

98

68

51

58

51

41

36

23

23

Q17

Hampshire and Isle of Wight Strategic HA

40

33

55

59

70

63

78

75

57

Q18

Kent and Medway Strategic HA

53

58

40

35

45

90

122

93

117

Q19

Surrey and Sussex Strategic HA

121

168

129

115

114

114

98

117

124

Q20

Avon, Gloucestershire and Wiltshire Strategic HA

83

82

96

87

101

62

81

30

36

Q21

South West Peninsula Strategic HA

161

95

122

126

125

90

79

16

6

Q22

Dorset and Somerset Strategic HA

31

36

32

34

27

42

41

41

22

Q23

South Yorkshire Strategic HA

82

73

85

61

46

58

55

12

3

Q24

Trent Strategic HA

119

100

118

143

124

106

114

61

75

Q25

Leicestershire, Northamptonshire and Rutland Strategic HA

115

100

51

21

35

21

42

45

34

Q26

Shropshire and Staffordshire Strategic HA

53

55

57

38

33

20

18

35

33

Q27

Birmingham and the Black Country Strategic HA

103

90

79

117

106

128

94

69

92

Q28

West Midlands South Strategic HA

65

54

41

54

55

77

82

49

63

Q30

North East SHA

167

160

Q31

North West SHA

377

367

Q32

Yorkshire and the Humber

265

265

Q33

East Midlands SHA

243

169

Q34

West Midlands SHA

194

204

Q35

East of England SHA

200

190

Q36

London SHA

492

458

Q37

South East Coast SHA

174

141

Q38

South Central SHA

89

85

Q39

South West SHA

245

218

Other and Unknown SHAs

203

363

188

203

286

539

724

711

709

850

1,004

Notes:
Finished admission episodes
A finished admission episode is the first period of in-patient care under one consultant within one health care provider. Finished admission episodes are counted against the year in which the admission episode finishes. Admissions do not represent the number of in-patients, as a person may have more than one admission within the year.
Primary diagnosis
The primary diagnosis is the first of up to 20 (14 from 2002-03 to 2006-07 and seven prior to 2002-03) diagnosis fields in the Hospital Episode Statistics (HES) data set and provides the main reason why the patient was admitted to hospital.
The ICD-10 codes used to identify sexually transmitted infections are as follows:
A50: Congenital syphilis
A51: Early syphilis
A52: Late syphilis
A53: Other and unspecified syphilis
A54: Gonococcal infection
A55: Chlamydial lymphogranuloma (venereum)
A56: Other sexually transmitted chlamydial diseases
A57: Chancroid
A58: Granuloma inguinale
A59: Trichomoniasis
A60: Anogenital herpesviral (herpes simplex) infection
A63: Other predominantly sexually transmitted diseases, not elsewhere classified
A64: Unspecified sexually transmitted disease
It should be noted that there are other diagnoses that can be transmitted sexually but are not limited to sexually transmission—they have been excluded from this response.
Data quality
HES are compiled from data sent by more than 300 NHS trusts and primary care trusts (PCTs) in England. Data are also received from a number of independent sector organisations for activity commissioned by the English NHS. The NHS Information Centre for health and social care liaises closely with these organisations to encourage submission of complete and valid data and seeks to minimise inaccuracies and the effect of missing and invalid data via HES processes. While this brings about improvement over time, some shortcomings remain.
PCT/SHA data quality
PCT and SHA data were added to historic data years in the HES database using 2002-03 boundaries, as a one-off exercise in 2004. The quality of the data on PCT of treatment and SHA of treatment is poor in 1996-97, 1997-98 and 1998-99, with over a third of all finished episodes having missing values in these years. Data quality of PCT of GP practice and SHA of general practitioner (GP) practice in 1997-98 and 1998-99 is also poor, with a high proportion missing values where practices changed or ceased to exist. There is less change in completeness of the residence-based fields over time, where the majority of unknown values are due to missing postcodes on birth episodes. Users of time series analysis including these years need to be aware of these issues in their interpretation of the data.
Assessing growth through time
HES figures are available from 1989-90 onwards. The quality and coverage of the data have improved over time. These improvements in information submitted by the NHS have been particularly marked in the earlier years and need to be borne in mind when analysing time series.
Some of the increase in figures for later years (particularly 2006-07 onwards) may be due to the improvement in the coverage of independent sector activity.
Changes in NHS practice also need to be borne in mind when analysing time series. For example, a number of procedures may now be undertaken in out-patient settings and may no longer be accounted for in the HES data. This may account for any reductions in activity over time.
Source:
Hospital Episode Statistics (HES), the NHS Information Centre for health and social care.

Next Section Index Home Page