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1 Jun 2009 : Column 166W—continued

Anne Main: To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department how many individual representations (a) she and (b) Ministers in her Department have received from members of the public regarding their personal immigration case in each of the last six months. [276375]

Mr. Woolas: Information regarding letters received from members of the public to Ministers regarding personal immigration cases is not available and could be obtained only at disproportionate cost.

Damian Green: To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department pursuant to the answer of 6 May 2009, Official Report, column 285W, on local immigration teams, where each of the nine operational teams is based. [276565]

Mr. Woolas: A further 14 local immigration teams (LITs) have become operational since the previous answer was given, with the total now standing at 23. These are based in the following areas:

Mr. Rooney: To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department what definition her Department uses of a legacy case in respect of the work of the UK Border Agency. [276818]

Mr. Woolas [holding answer 21 May 2009]: Legacy cases are all unresolved asylum cases that were lodged with the UK Border Agency before March 2007 that are not being processed by the Regional Asylum Teams.


1 Jun 2009 : Column 167W

Immigration Controls

Chris Grayling: To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department what steps have been taken to develop joint threat assessment mechanisms between police forces and the UK Border Agency to underpin operational work at the UK border; and what timetable has been established for the work. [273026]

Jacqui Smith: Following on from the memorandum of understanding which was signed in 2008, the UK Border Agency and the Association of Chief Police Officers (ACPO) are continuing to work closely together to enhance their relationship at the UK border. UKBA have senior officials in place at ports of entry to facilitate liaison with the police and other agencies. This collaboration is designed to increase opportunities for working together, including the capacity for joint threat assessments.

Chris Huhne: To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department what consultation was undertaken on the change to Tier One of the immigration points-based system requiring applicants to hold a Masters degree rather than a Bachelors degree. [276310]

Jacqui Smith: The changes to the requirements for Tier 1 were discussed widely across Government Departments.

Chris Huhne: To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department what discussions she has had with the Secretary of State for Health on the effect on medical training of the recent change to Tier One immigration rules for highly skilled migrants; and if she will make a statement. [276311]

Jacqui Smith: I and my Cabinet colleagues have regular discussions about changes to the immigration system. Officials continue to work together to ensure that changes to the immigration system do not have an adverse impact on this important sector.

Damian Green: To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department how many sponsors for Tier 2 of the points-based immigration system are classified as (a) category A and (b) category B. [276560]

Mr. Woolas: There are 9,168 registered Tier 2 sponsors, of which 8,841 are rated as category A and 327 as category B.

Immigration: Children

Mr. Fabian Hamilton: To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department what her Department’s policy is on the detention of children subject to immigration control. [276127]

Mr. Woolas: The UK Border Agency would always prefer that those whose applications to stay in the United Kingdom have failed, leave the country voluntarily. This is particularly so of families with children. However, detention is regrettable where individuals fail to leave and where removal therefore has to be enforced.

Mr. Fabian Hamilton: To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department what her Department’s
1 Jun 2009 : Column 168W
response is to the findings of the Children’s Commissioner’s report The Arrest and Detention of Children Subject to Immigration Control. [276128]

Mr. Woolas: The Children’s Commissioner for England published his report on 27 April. The United Kingdom Border Agency is now considering his recommendations carefully and will respond to the commissioner within two months of publication.

Immigration: Detainees

Mr. Evans: To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department how many adults currently held in immigration removal centres in the UK have been held there for (a) less than six, (b) between six and 12, (c) 12 to 24 and (d) longer than 24 months. [272194]

Mr. Woolas [holding answer 1 May 2009]: The following table shows the number of adults detained solely under Immigration Act powers as at the end of December 2008 by length of detention.

Persons recorded as being in detention in the United Kingdom solely under Immigration Act powers by length of detention as at 27 December 2008( 1,2)
Number of persons
Of whom:
Length of detention( 3) Total detainees Adults Children( 4)

Less than 6 months

(5)1,800

(5)1,760

40

6 months to less than 12 months

(5)295

(5)295

12 months to less than 24 months

(5)135

(5)135

24 months or more

(5)15

(5)15

Grand total

2,250

2,210

40

(1) Figures rounded to the nearest 5 (‘—’ = 0), may not sum to the totals shown because of independent rounding and exclude persons detained in police cells, Prison Service establishments and those detained under both criminal and immigration powers.
(2) Figures include dependants.
(3) Relates to most recent period of sole detention.
(4) People recorded as being under 18 on 27 December 2008. These figures will overstate if any applicants aged 18 or over claim to be younger.
(5) Figures are based on management information. This information has not been quality assured under National Statistics protocols, is subject to change and should be treated as provisional.

National Statistics on how many detainees, including children, are detained on a quarterly snapshot basis by length of detention is available in table 11 of the Control of Immigration Quarterly Statistical Summary United Kingdom publication

and from the Library of the House.

Immigration: EU Nationals

David Howarth: To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department how many applications for European Economic Area residence cards were received by the UK Border Agency in the latest year for which figures are available; and how many such applications resulted in a residence card being issued within six months. [274814]


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Mr. Woolas: Based on the period 12 May 2008 to 12 May 2009, UKBA received a total of 26,930 EEA residence card applications. The number of issues during this period was 1,550. Of these 740 were issued within six months.

Please note these figures have been rounded to the nearest five.

Immigration: Families

Kate Hoey: To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department what estimate she has made of the average processing time for residence card applications for family members of EEA nationals. [267839]

Mr. Woolas: Based on the applications decided over the preceding 12 month period, the average processing time of applications for residence cards for family members of EEA nationals was eight months.

Kate Hoey: To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department how many applications for residence cards for family members of EEA nationals took longer than six months to process in each of the last three years. [267840]

Mr. Woolas: The number of applications for residence cards for family members of EEA that took over six months to process, in each of the last three years, are as follows:

Total of cases with a processing time of 6+ months

2006(1)

810

2007

4,480

2008

6,420

2009(2)

3,890

Total

15,600

(1) From 6 May 2006
(2) To 6 May 2009
Note:
All figures have been rounded to the nearest five.

Kate Hoey: To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department how many applications for residence cards for family members of EEA nationals are being processed. [267841]

Mr. Woolas: As of 6 May 2009 the number of applications for residence cards for family members of EEA nationals awaiting processing was 28,590.

Industrial Health and Safety

Bob Spink: To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department how much her Department spent on compliance with requirements of health and safety at work legislation in each of the last five years; and if she will make a statement. [274540]

Mr. Woolas: The information requested is not collated centrally and could be provided only at disproportionate cost.


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International Organisation for Migration: Finance

Damian Green: To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department how much funding her Department allocated to the International Organisation for Migration in 2008. [271370]

Mr. Woolas: The Home Office has allocated approximately £19.9 million to the International Organisation for Migration for the financial year 2008-09. This figure is subject to audit.

Licensed Premises: Wales

Mrs. Gillan: To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department how many (a) public houses, (b) night clubs and (c) other licensed premises in each police force area in Wales have been issued with (i) a written warning, (ii) a penalty notice and (iii) a temporary or permanent closure notice as a result of drunken behaviour in or around the licensed premises under the powers of the Licensing Act 2003, in each year since the Act came into force. [270704]

Mr. Alan Campbell [holding answer 23 April 2009]: The Home Office does not collect data centrally on any of the issues raised.

Penalty notices for disorder (PNDs) can only be issued to individuals for 24 specific offences. Information collected centrally records the offence but is not broken down further to provide details of location etc. PNDs cannot be issued to ‘other’ defendants which would include companies and public bodies.

Data on the number of closure notices issued are collected by the Department for Culture, Media and Sport who have provided the following Tables. These cannot be broken down by premises type.


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Table 1: Number of completed reviews following a premises licences closure order—Welsh licensing authorities
Premises licence (following closure orders under s.161 of Act)

April 2006 to March 2007 April 2007 to March 2008

Blaenau Gwent

0

0

Bridgend

0

0

Caerphilly

1

0

Cardiff

0

0

Carmarthenshire

0

0

Ceredigion

0

0

Conwy

0

0

Denbighshire

0

0

Flintshire

0

1

Gwynedd

n/a

0

Isle of Anglesey

0

1

Merthyr Tydfil

0

0

Monmouthshire

0

0

Neath Port Talbot

0

0

Newport

n/a

0

Pembrokeshire

0

0

Powys

0

0

Rhondda Cynon Taff

n/a

0

Swansea

0

0

Torfaen

0

0

Vale of Glamorgan

0

0

Wrexham

0

0

Wales total

1

2

Notes:
1. Does not include closure orders where a review did not take place.
2. This power did not come into force until May 2007.
3. Statistics on Alcohol, Entertainment and Late Night Refreshment licensing have been collected on an annual basis since 2006-07. This collection does not identify the number of public houses in England and Wales, but rather the number of premises authorising the sale or supply of alcohol by means of a premises licence or a club premises certificate. The figures therefore include licensed premises such as hotels, off licences and convenience stores as well as public houses.

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