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22 Jun 2009 : Column 690W—continued


22 Jun 2009 : Column 691W

6 March distribution list:


22 Jun 2009 : Column 692W

Higher Education: Admissions

Mr. Willetts: To ask the Minister of State, Department for Business, Innovation and Skills pursuant to the answer of 3 June 2009, Official Report, column 580W, on higher education: admissions, what information his Department holds on household incomes of those domiciled in the UK who are (a) university applicants and (b) undergraduate students. [278872]

Mr. Lammy: University applicants are not required to provide details of their household income. However, if undergraduate students apply for means-tested student finance they are required to submit household income details. Complete information on household incomes is not held because some apply for non means-tested support, and household income details are not required for such products.

Andrew Gwynne: To ask the Minister of State, Department for Business, Innovation and Skills what percentage of young people living in (a) Tameside and (b) Stockport entered university in each of the last 10 years. [279762]

Mr. Lammy: The latest information on the number of young undergraduate entrants from Tameside and Stockport local authorities is shown in the table. Figures for the 2008/09 academic year will be available in January 2010.


22 Jun 2009 : Column 693W
Young( 1) undergraduate entrants( 2) from Tameside and Stockport local authorities( 3) —UK higher education institutions( 4) , academic years 1998/99 to 2007/08
Academic year Stockport Tameside

1998/99

1,300

570

1999/00

1,370

660

2000/01

1,285

675

2001/02

1,380

695

2002/03

1,450

735

2003/04

1,385

760

2004/05

1,475

765

2005/06

1,580

865

2006/07

1,495

790

2007/08

1,480

785

(1 “)Young” refers to entrants aged under 21. (2) Covers entrants to both full-time and part-time courses. (3) Local authority is derived from postcode as recorded on the HESA student record. Those with missing or invalid postcodes will be coded as missing. (4) Excludes the Open University due to inconsistencies in their coding of entrants across the time series. Notes: 1. Figures are on a snapshot basis as at 1 December to provide consistency across the time series. 2. Figures have been rounded to the nearest five. Source: Higher Education Statistics Agency (HESA).

It is not possible to calculate what proportion of young people from Tameside and Stockport local authorities began an undergraduate course at a UK higher education institution in recent years. The Higher Education Funding Council for England (HEFCE) published “Young participation in higher education” in January 2005, which is available from the HEFCE website at:

The HEFCE report shows participation rates for young people who enter higher education aged 18 or 19 disaggregated by local education authority (LEA) for the years 1997 to 2000.

At national level, the Higher Education Initial Participation Rate (HEIPR) covers English-domiciled 17 to 30-year-old first-time entrants to higher education courses, at UK higher education institutions and English, Scottish and Welsh further education colleges, who remain on their course for at least six months. The latest available figure is 43.3 per cent. in 2007/08. For young people (aged 17-20), the figure is 34.2 per cent.

Higher Education: Coventry

Mr. Jim Cunningham: To ask the Minister of State, Department for Business, Innovation and Skills what funding his Department plans to provide to universities in Coventry for research in (a) medicine, (b) history, (c) English and (d) modern foreign languages in 2009-10. [278931]

Mr. Lammy: HEFCE block grant research funding allocations for 2009-10 for the university of Coventry and university of Warwick are shown in the tables that follow. These show allocations of funding awarded in relation to each unit of assessment submitted at the last Research Assessment Exercise. Once calculated, the funding is awarded as a block grant and Higher Education Institutions have the freedom to choose where to invest this funding—and need not spend it in the disciplines that “earned” it.

In addition, BIS funds research through the research councils. These largely fund on the basis of competitively selecting projects through peer review.


22 Jun 2009 : Column 694W
HEFCE research funding for the university of Warwick for 2009-10
Unit of assessment HEFCE research funding for 2009-10 (£)

4 Other Hospital Based Clinical Subjects

1,087,016

7 Health Services Research

1,206,826

14 Biological Sciences

2,683,369

16 Agriculture, Veterinary and Food Science

1,569,670

18 Chemistry

1,858,866

19 Physics

2,187,013

20 Pure Mathematics

1,324,095

21 Applied Mathematics

1,220,972

22 Statistics and Operational Research

996,912

23 Computer Science and Informatics

978,352

25 General Engineering and Mineral and Mining Engineering

3,348,681

34 Economics and Econometrics

1,546,661

36 Business and Management Studies

3,176,974

38 Law

718,560

39 Politics and International Studies

734,216

40 Social Work and Social Policy and Administration

542,639

41 Sociology

870,509

44 Psychology

489,549

45 Education

938,453

52 French

291,060

53 German, Dutch and Scandinavian Languages

128,388

54 Italian

174,491

57 English Language and Literature

936,679

59 Classics, Ancient History, Byzantine and Modern Greek Studies

324,185

60 Philosophy

452,787

62 History

1,068,101

64 History of Art, Architecture and Design

201,491

65 Drama, Dance and Performing Arts

952,815

Total QR attributable to subjects

32,009,330

QR business research element

623,853

QR for national research libraries

0

Total research funding

32,633,183


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