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21 July 2009 : Column 1449W—continued


21 July 2009 : Column 1450W

Mr. Coaker: For more than a decade we have worked with the Teacher Training Agency, now the Training and Development Agency for Schools (TDA), and training providers to secure the continuous quality improvement of Initial Teacher Training (ITT).

The standards for Qualified Teacher Status (QTS) were revised in 1998, 2002 and 2007 setting out progressively more demanding expectations of beginner teachers. Statutory requirements apply to all accredited providers of ITT to ensure training is designed to make sure new teachers have met all of the standards. The TDA uses quality categories derived from Ofsted inspections when allocating ITT places and funding to higher education institutions and school-based providers.

In the 10 years that this allocation approach has been used in full, the percentage of undergraduate and Postgraduate Certificate in Education (PGCE) ITT places allocated to high quality ITT providers has increased from 68 to 96 per cent. This approach has helped secure positive results from the TDA's annual survey of newly qualified teachers. Currently 85 per cent. of primary newly qualified teachers and 86 per cent. of secondary newly qualified teachers rate their training as good or very good.

The outcomes of the first full inspections by Ofsted of the Graduate Teacher Programme will be available in the autumn of 2009 which will assess quality of training through that route. Since 2003 Teach First has brought into teaching many high quality graduates who would otherwise not have considered the profession. Ofsted said that some of their trainees were the best it had ever seen. Currently around half of teachers trained on this route remain in the profession at the end of their induction year.

The agency's special educational needs (SEN) and disability programme of work has been developed within the context of the Government's long-term strategy: "Removing Barriers to Achievement" (2004), the "Children's Plan" (December 2007) and other evidence. Resources have been put in place to ensure that all trainees are well-prepared to teach children and young people with SEN and disabilities.

Since 2000 the agency has invested nearly £20 million of its funding from the Department to support Information and Communication Technologies (ICT) in initial teacher training alongside the Government's investment in ICT in schools. The aim is to ensure that all NQTs have strong skills in using ICT to support teaching and learning.

TDA have worked with schools and ITT providers to ensure that ITT is up-to-date, responds rapidly to changes in the schools' curriculum, that ITT partnerships are secure and that every trainee has effective school based training.

The SEN modules on dyslexia, autism and other frequently encountered special needs that were developed for primary ITT, were launched in June 2008 and have been well-received. Similar modules for secondary training were launched on 25 June 2009. PGCE materials are due to be launched later in 2009.

Evaluation shows that the great majority of trainee teachers have access to a personal laptop and have opportunities to use ICT to support teaching and learning while on school experience. Research indicates that trainees and ITT providers have integrated the effective use of ICT in practice.


21 July 2009 : Column 1451W

"The Teacher Training Resource Bank" (www.ttrb.ac.uk) provides access to up-to-date materials and relevant research to support ITT. Over 5,000 articles are viewed daily and the site has 18,000 registered users. Evaluation shows that the resources support quality improvement by giving trainers access to key materials cost-effectively.

In 1997 there were approximately 27,000 trainees requiring schools experience as part of their ITT programme. Currently the figure is approximately 38,000. Ofsted indicates that this expansion has been achieved effectively.

DCSF and TDA monitor and support training providers to implement the approach to the teaching of early reading recommended by Sir Jim Rose based on the teaching of phonics.

TDA has a range of programmes t o improve the recruitment of mathematics and science teachers by means of a targeted campaign. The target for the training of primary teachers of modern languages with 900 new teachers having an enhanced experience in teaching French, German or Spanish in 2008/09 has been met.

The TDA have boosted the numbers of trainees who report having had a 'very good' or 'good' grounding in phonics from 35 per cent. in 2006 to 49 per cent. in the 2008 cohort. TDA have ambitious targets for further progress.

The diversity of routes to teaching and programmes such as Transition to Teaching has boosted the supply of new science and maths teachers. The agency works to help provide additional training both pre-service and in-service to develop the subject knowledge of specialist teachers in science and mathematics.

Michael Gove: To ask the Secretary of State for Children, Schools and Families (1) how many teachers entered the profession via the Graduate Teacher Programme in the latest year for which figures are available; [288347]

(2) how many new primary school teachers had B.Ed degrees in the latest year for which figures are available. [288348]

Mr. Coaker: In 2006/07, 5,140 trainees gained qualified teacher status (QTS) through the graduate teacher programme. There were 5,090 trainees who gained BA or BSc with QTS or BEd via a primary initial teacher training course.

Michael Gove: To ask the Secretary of State for Children, Schools and Families how much money has been spent on developing the Masters course in teaching and learning. [288349]

Mr. Coaker: Since the Masters in Teaching and Learning was announced by the Secretary of State for Children, Schools and Families in March 2008, £1,482,070 has been spent on developing the programme. A further £3,250,123, split between the Training and Development Agency for Schools and MTL providers (schools and higher education institutions), is budgeted for the development of the programme between now and its launch in April 2010.

Michael Gove: To ask the Secretary of State for Children, Schools and Families how many students are registered to begin the Masters course in teaching and learning in the next academic year. [288350]


21 July 2009 : Column 1452W

Mr. Coaker: The latest figures available show that as of 17 July 2009, 2,893 trainee teachers had expressed an interest in the Masters in Teaching and Learning (MTL) via the TDA's website, of which 1,871 intend to teach in an eligible school and enrol for MTL in 2009/10. Eligible newly qualified teachers will be able to enrol with their MTL provider in January 2010, to commence MTL from the summer term 2010.

Teaching Methods

Michael Gove: To ask the Secretary of State for Children, Schools and Families what percentage of classes in (a) primary and (b) secondary schools were set by ability at the most recent date for which figures are available. [286403]

Mr. Coaker: This is a matter for Ofsted. HM Chief Inspector, Christine Gilbert, has written to the hon. Member and a copy of her reply has been placed in the House Libraries.

Letter from Christine Gilbert, dated 16 July 2009:

Table A: All lessons observed during Ofsted inspections 2007/08, by lesson grouping
Percentage of lessons observed
School phase Mixed ability Setted, streamed or banded Other

Primary schools (including middle deemed primary)

85

14

2

Secondary schools (including middle deemed secondary, academies and city technology colleges)

54

45

1

Note:
These figures include all lessons, not just national curriculum subjects, in years 1 to 6 (primary) and 7 to 11 (secondary).


21 July 2009 : Column 1453W

Young People: Connexions Service

Michael Gove: To ask the Secretary of State for Children, Schools and Families what percentage of 13 to 19 year olds received one-to-one careers guidance from a Connexions adviser in each local authority in each of the last five years. [287244]

Mr. Iain Wright: The information is not available in the form requested.

Young people: Unemployment

Mr. Clappison: To ask the Secretary of State for Children, Schools and Families pursuant to the answer of 9 July 2009, Official Report, column 1018W, on young people: unemployed, how many and what proportion of people aged 16 to 24 years old were not in education, employment or training in each region in the second quarter of 2009. [288021]

Mr. Iain Wright: Quarterly estimates of the number of people aged 16-24 who were not in education, employment or training are produced from the labour force survey (LFS). The LFS data relating to the second quarter of 2009 are not available until 12 August 2009.


21 July 2009 : Column 1454W

Youth Services: Greater London

Ms Buck: To ask the Secretary of State for Children, Schools and Families what (a) capital and (b) other expenditure from the public purse per 1,000 of the population between 11 and 18 years old was in respect of youth services in real terms in each London local authority in (i) 1997 and (ii) 2008. [288336]

Dawn Primarolo: The Government do not set a budget for spending on youth services. Local authorities receive funding from Government through the revenue support grant for youth services and it is for them to decide how much funding should be spent based on Government priorities and local needs. Information on local authority capital expenditure on youth facilities is not collected by the Department.

Since 2006, the Department has provided capital funding to local areas through the Youth Capital Fund and from 2008, the 'myplace' initiative.

The following table sets out expenditure in respect of youth services for each London local authority from 2001-09 and funds allocated in respect of the Youth Capital Fund and 'myplace' initiative for 2008-09. The Department does not hold information as far back as 1997.


21 July 2009 : Column 1455W

21 July 2009 : Column 1456W
The Education (Budget Statements) (England) Regulations, budgeted net expenditure by local authorities in England on youth services( 1) : 2000-01 to 2008-09( 2, 3) , real terms figures( 3) as reported by local authorities as at 16 July 2009
£
Budgeted net expenditure on youth services( 1, 2, 3)
LA no. LA name 2000-01 2001-02( 2) 2002-03( 2) 2003-04 2004-05 2005-06 2006-07 2007-08 2008-09

201

City of London

343,464

163,174

147,598

160,874

189,016

250,541

269,598

311,574

247,700

202

Camden

2,713,113

2,777,364

2,752,066

2,605,799

2,573,320

2,667,087

2,762,048

2,651,919

3,965,941

203

Greenwich

3,073,628

3,120,302

3,196,499

3,444,560

3,518,219

3,673,243

3,565,777

3,249,075

4,000,039

204

Hackney

1,481,979

0

0

1,218,759

1,287,989

1,625,160

2,576,962

2,864,097

2,834,026

205

Hammersmith and Fulham

918,938

1,326,211

1,021,692

1,336,721

1,338,005

1,423,898

1,432,163

1,436,267

1,447,462

206

Islington

7,350,124

6,679,333

7,230,320

3,577,437

3,689,476

3,568,988

2,820,935

2,450,530

2,955,890

207

Kensington and Chelsea

4,823,487

4,331,200

4,402,932

4,186,913

2,169,536

2,081,153

2,546,862

3,142,053

3,489,130

208

Lambeth

2,324,256

6,673,567

3,713,284

4,077,371

2,091,816

1,947,302

1,993,425

2,237,457

2,655,278

209

Lewisham

3,336,647

3,508,472

3,184,081

3,362,278

3,620,286

3,763,667

3,778,997

3,580,390

3,766,323

210

Southwark

3,467,803

3,476,161

3,554,935

3,783,205

4,596,661

4,037,539

3,863,074

4,042,904

3,575,586

211

Tower Hamlets

5,153,428

5,271,296

5,621,924

5,450,829

4,583,635

4,947,740

4,790,167

4,757,733

4,825,619

212

Wandsworth

0

3,578,619

3,678,776

3,632,492

3,649,693

3,186,246

3,254,117

3,346,001

3,287,338

213

Westminster

2,123,707

2,127,271

2,329,791

2,198,460

2,490,913

2,796,388

2,929,445

2,559,116

3,073,895

301

Barking and Dagenham

1,186,645

1,079,532

1,061,251

1,220,695

1,300,498

1,278,397

1,304,492

1,400,037

1,285,298

302

Barnet

2,777,857

2,197,757

2,680,121

2,035,109

1,680,635

1,364,147

1,437,453

1,517,521

1,745,380

303

Bexley

1,935,975

1,958,570

2,209,315

2,200,838

2,350,583

2,387,543

2,175,055

2,005,968

2,002,000

304

Brent

2,684,077

2,496,876

2,543,389

1,852,145

2,164,431

2,371,324

2,624,559

2,703,918

2,689,000

305

Bromley

1,381,934

1,345,682

1,249,464

1,257,600

1,269,690

1,274,865

1,465,806

1,478,776

1,610,782

306

Croydon

3,090,196

3,133,357

3,984,922

4,049,418

2,901,942

3,086,461

4,116,259

3,659,509

3,827,756

307

Ealing

1,879,100

1,863,645

1,763,028

1,866,636

1,812,945

1,831,747

1,740,674

1,909,161

2,034,817

308

Enfield

1,211,346

1,264,459

1,305,622

1,534,453

1,586,325

1,641,583

1,731,394

2,067,894

2,356,094

309

Haringey

1,843,500

2,278,670

2,289,957

2,373,737

2,158,593

2,220,812

2,301,249

1,900,549

1,936,960

310

Harrow

945,419

1,195,620

911,880

1,003,515

1,283,496

1,808,846

1,777,392

1,548,194

1,567,760

311

Havering

1,632,773

1,505,391

1,550,874

2,031,892

2,043,360

2,132,731

1,977,598

2,016,871

4,612,120

312

Hillingdon

1,777,477

1,770,166

2,068,481

2,414,678

2,515,969

3,322,512

3,284,588

2,048,959

2,253,644

313

Hounslow

905,953

923,532

965,189

928,156

960,476

1,434,120

1,382,826

1,347,263

2,107,125

314

Kingston upon Thames

935,383

1,174,366

1,166,076

1,233,981

1,348,176

1,304,017

1,317,049

1,352,668

1,434,626

315

Merton

678,423

691,782

705,083

913,427

891,129

915,904

1,098,527

1,214,509

1,299,420

316

Newham

1,486,220

1,666,259

1,776,509

3,605,910

3,707,385

3,581,707

3,560,941

3,540,934

5,932,663

317

Redbridge

1,990,481

2,126,689

2,351,850

2,268,553

2,098,835

2,131,846

2,136,141

2,242,884

2,323,512

318

Richmond upon Thames

922,782

776,819

807,599

791,011

811,469

1,027,790

1,132,163

1,437,900

1,399,813

319

Sutton

1,706,824

1,844,247

2,010,672

1,466,170

1,463,751

1,452,936

1,440,621

1,309,914

1,363,760

320

Waltham Forest

2,574,350

3,499,808

2,402,351

2,213,314

2,373,009

2,521,670

2,427,953

2,381,205

2,515,168

Total

70,657,291

77,826,194

76,637,529

76,296,935

72,521,261

75,059,909

77,016,308

75,713,752

86,421,924

Notes:
1. Youth service includes the following items of planned expenditure on the Youth Service and youth work:
Employees
Staff Training
Premises-related expenditure
Transport-related expenditure
Supplies and services
Third-party payments
Support services
Youth work costs at residential and non-residential youth centres
Youth work costs at activity at outdoor and urban studies centres
Grant funding to the voluntary sector for youth work.
2. The 2001-02 and 2002-03 figures also include any local authority youth service provision that contributed to the delivery of the Connexions Service plus any Connexions Service specific funding.
3. Cash figures are converted to 2008-09 prices using the 30 June 2009 gross domestic product (GDP) deflators.
Source:
Figures are drawn from local authorities Section 52 Budget Statement (Table 1) submitted to the DCSF (formally DfES).

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