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11 Jan 2010 : Column 744W—continued

Tony Blair

Norman Baker: To ask the Secretary of State for International Development how many officials of his Department are presently seconded to support Tony Blair in his role as Middle East peace envoy; what procedure is in place for those officials to report formally to their home Department; and whether they remain subject to the Civil Service code. [309247]

Mr. Michael Foster: At present the Department for International Development (DFID) has one person seconded to the Office of the Quartet Representative (OQR). This secondee is tasked on a day-to-day basis by the Head of the OQR, but reports formally to the Head of DFID's office in Jerusalem. As the secondee continues to be a UK civil servant, they are still subject to the Civil Service code.

Norman Baker: To ask the Secretary of State for International Development on what date (a) he and (b) other Ministers in his Department last met Tony Blair in his capacity as Middle East peace envoy. [309249]

Mr. Michael Foster: Tony Blair was appointed the representative of the Middle East diplomatic Quartet (the United Nations, Russian Federation, United States, and European Union) in June 2007. There have been no
11 Jan 2010 : Column 745W
formal meetings between Tony Blair and the Secretary of State for International Development, or other Ministers in the Department of International Development, since he was appointed to this role.

Staff from the Department for International Development's office in Jerusalem are in regular contact with the Office of the Quartet Representative, which is also based in Jerusalem.

World Food Programme

Gordon Banks: To ask the Secretary of State for International Development whether his Department's assessment of the benefits of the World Food Programme has changed in the last three years. [309793]

Mr. Michael Foster: The Department for International Development (DFID) delivers more humanitarian assistance through the World Food Programme (WFP) than through any other agency.

The UK Government continue to recognise the vital role of the WFP in responding to emergencies around the world, saving millions of lives. The WFP plays an important role in emergency logistics, preparedness and disaster risk management and in fragile and post-conflict situations is often uniquely placed to help deliver effective transitions to stability.

WFP is also increasingly working to enhance long-term food security. Examples include programmes to improve nutrition and using their local purchasing power to create markets for smallholder farmers. However the evidence base for the effectiveness of some interventions, especially in more stable development contexts, requires strengthening.

Gordon Banks: To ask the Secretary of State for International Development for what reason the UK contribution to the World Food Programme has been reduced in real terms since 2008; on what projects or programmes expenditure has been reduced as a consequence; and if he will make a statement. [309795]

Mr. Michael Foster: UK direct contributions to WFP in 2008 and 2009 were £89.9 million (equivalent to US$169 million) and £81.7 million (equivalent to US$127.6 million) respectively. These are the two highest contributions in the period 2004-09. Our ranking among WFP's donors was similar (seventh in 2008 and eighth in 2009) and our share of WFP's total income (in US$ terms) was almost the same (3.3 per cent. in 2008 and 3.2 per cent. in 2009). In both years we contributed more to WFP than to any other humanitarian agency or fund.

Our contributions to WFP take into account the different ways in which we can help protect the most vulnerable. The main reason we contributed less to WFP in some countries in 2009 is that while the food price crisis of 2008 required an exceptional food assistance response, the persisting problems of food insecurity required a broader range of actions-not all involving WFP. For example in Bangladesh we are tackling chronic food insecurity through our social protection, livelihoods and health/nutrition interventions. In Kenya we are supporting non-governmental organisations that who are specifically working on child malnutrition.

Our 2008 funding was also boosted by the response to Cyclone Nargis (£12.6 million equivalent to
11 Jan 2010 : Column 746W
US$24.8 million) and the final year of our institutional strengthening programme with WFP (£2.8 million equivalent to US$5.0 million).

Health

Alcoholism: Health Services

Ms Keeble: To ask the Secretary of State for Health how many alcohol-related admissions there were for 16 to 24 years olds in (a) Northamptonshire, (b) the East Midlands and (c) England in each of the last three years. [308647]

Gillian Merron: The number of 16 to 24-year-olds admitted to hospital with an alcohol-related diagnosis in Northamptonshire, the East Midlands and England for the last three years is given in the table. The Department does not collect data on the number of alcohol-related hospital admissions in Wales.

Data on alcohol-related admissions in Wales were published by the Welsh Assembly Government in their annual publication Substance Misuse in Wales. However, it is important to note that the methodology used to produce these data differ from that used for England and so the two sets of data are not comparable.

Number of hospital admissions of patients aged 16 to 24-year-olds with an alcohol-related diagnosis, 2006-07 to 2008-09

2006-07 2007-08 2008-09

Northamptonshire

535

626

679

East Midlands

3,396

4,488

4,518

England

46,852

49,287

49,315

Activity:
Includes activity in English national health service hospitals and English NHS commissioned activity in the independent sector.
Alcohol-related admissions:
The number of alcohol-related admissions is based on the methodology developed by the North West Public Health Observatory.
Ungrossed data:
Figures have not been adjusted for shortfalls in data (i.e. the data are ungrossed).
Data quality:
Hospital Episode Statistics (HES) are compiled from data sent by more than 300 NHS trusts and primary care trusts (PCTs) in England. Data are also received from a number of independent sector organisations for activity commissioned by the English NHS. The NHS Information Centre for health and social care liaises closely with these organisations to encourage submission of complete and valid data and seeks to minimise inaccuracies and the effect of missing and invalid data via HES processes. While this brings about improvement over time, some shortcomings remain.
Assessing growth through time:
HES figures are available from 1989-90 onwards. The quality and coverage of the data have improved over time. These improvements in information submitted by the NHS have been particularly marked in the earlier years and need to be borne in mind when analysing time series. Some of the increase in figures for later years (particularly 2006-07 onwards) may be due to the improvement in the coverage of independent sector activity.
Changes in NHS practice also need to be borne in mind when analysing time series. For example, a number of procedures may now be undertaken in out-patient settings and may no longer be accounted for in the HES data. This may account for any reductions in activity over time.
Assignment of episodes to years:
Years are assigned by the end of the first period of care in a patient's hospital stay.
Source:
Hospital Episode Statistics (HES), The Information Centre for Health and Social Care

Babies: Screening

Mr. Clelland: To ask the Secretary of State for Health what steps he plans to take to implement the recommendations of the NHS Human Tissue Authority Research Project entitled "Routine examination of the newborn: the EMREN study". [308273]


11 Jan 2010 : Column 747W

Ann Keen: Recommendations from research funded by the Health Technology Assessment Programme "Routine examination of the newborn: the EMREN study" (2004) have been taken forward through:

Carers

Mr. Touhig: To ask the Secretary of State for Health what estimate has been made of the number of people who have left full-time employment in the last three years to become a carer. [308149]

Phil Hope: This information is not held centrally.

Carers: Tamworth

Mr. Jenkins: To ask the Secretary of State for Health how many people resident in Tamworth constituency and aged over 60 were registered as carers in each year since 2007. [309444]

Phil Hope: Carers may register with a range of organisations for different purposes-there is no single register as such.

The NHS Information Centre for health and social care does not collect the number of registered carers.

The number of carers aged 65 and over offered an assessment or review by Staffordshire county council was 1,130 in 2007-08 and 1,260 in 2008-09 (provisional).

Data at constituency level are not centrally available.

Children: Obesity

Mr. Lancaster: To ask the Secretary of State for Health what percentage of children between (a) five and 10 and (b) 11 and 16 years old have been diagnosed as clinically overweight in (i) England and (ii) Milton Keynes in each year since 1997. [308086]


11 Jan 2010 : Column 748W

Gillian Merron: The information is not available in the format requested. Data are not held nationally on children who have been diagnosed as clinically overweight.

Children trend table 4 in the "Health Survey for England-2008: trend tables" contains the percentage of children aged 2-10 and 11-16 in England who are overweight in each year between 1997 and 2008. This publication has been placed in the Library.

Further information on the proportion of children who are overweight in England is collected through the National Child Measurement Programme (NCMP). Table A in the NCMP main report shows the prevalence of overweight children aged 4-5 years and 10-11 years in Milton Keynes primary care trust area for 2006-09. Copies of the publications have been placed in the Library.

Keith Vaz: To ask the Secretary of State for Health (1) how many children under the age of 16 years old in (a) Leicester and (b) England were classified as (i) overweight and (ii) obese at the latest date for which information is available; [308742]

(2) how many children under the age of 16 years old diagnosed as diabetic were overweight or obese in each of the last five years. [308745]

Gillian Merron: The data are not available in the requested format.

Data showing the number of children in England who are overweight and obese have been published in the Health Survey for England-2008: trend tables. In the Population Number Estimate Tables, Table 6 contains the numbers of children aged two to 15 years old who are overweight and obese. This table is available from the following link:

A copy of the full report is available on the Information Centre website at:

Data on the number of children under 16 with diabetes who are overweight or obese are not collected centrally.

Continuing Care

Miss McIntosh: To ask the Secretary of State for Health how many patients qualified for continuing healthcare in each primary care trust area in each of the last three years. [309312]

Phil Hope: The requested information is provided in the following table.


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Number receiving NHS continuing healthcare 2007-08 to 2009-10.
Quarter
Organisation code Organisation name 2007- 08 2008- 09 2009- 10

England

24,952

37,920

44,924

5HG

Ashton, Leigh and Wigan PCT

126

518

561

5C2

Barking and Dagenham PCT

96

285

309

5A9

Barnet PCT

242

363

431

5JE

Barnsley PCT

51

70

176

5ET

Bassetlaw PCT

17

38

58

5FL

Bath and North East Somerset PCT

158

234

213

5P2

Bedfordshire PCT

172

151

226

5QG

Berkshire East PCT

71

535

265

5QF

Berkshire West PCT

268

186

193

TAK

Bexley Care Trust

127

155

122

5PG

Birmingham East and North PCT

147

220

258

5CC

Blackburn with Darwen PCT

49

46

65

5HP

Blackpool PCT

55

230

64

5HQ

Bolton PCT

119

175

277

5QN

Bournemouth and Poole PCT

146

418

670

5NY

Bradford and Airedale PCT

166

328

683

5K5

Brent PCT

583

344

510

5LQ

Brighton and Hove City PCT

156

154

176

5QJ

Bristol PCT

86

295

366

5A7

Bromley PCT

168

173

219

5QD

Buckinghamshire PCT

0

375

421

5JX

Bury PCT

22

42

79

5J6

Calderdale PCT

77

179

254

5PP

Cambridgeshire PCT

174

387

401

5K7

Camden PCT

166

115

181

5NP

Central and Eastern Cheshire PCT

100

293

402

5NG

Central Lancashire PCT

206

288

305

5C3

City and Hackney PCT

175

218

143

5QP

Cornwall and Isles of Scilly PCT

541

684

718

5ND

County Durham PCT

517

575

560

5MD

Coventry PCT

836

449

331

5K9

Croydon PCT

215

311

325

5NE

Cumbria PCT

140

142

240

5J9

Darlington PCT

63

120

173

5N7

Derby City PCT

152

248

332

5N6

Derbyshire County PCT

218

816

848

5QQ

Devon PCT

227

989

757

5N5

Doncaster PCT

153

410

306

5QM

Dorset PCT

42

539

579

5PE

Dudley PCT

277

214

322

5HX

Ealing PCT

77

85

208

5P3

East and North Hertfordshire PCT

285

211

244

5NH

East Lancashire PCT

116

190

144

5NW

East Riding of Yorkshire PCT

35

86

177

5P7

East Sussex Downs and Weald PCT

181

181

254

5QA

Eastern and Coastal Kent PCT

329

406

304

5C1

Enfield PCT

168

239

223

5KF

Gateshead PCT

116

93

121

5QH

Gloucestershire PCT

61

280

465

5PR

Great Yarmouth and Waveney PCT

43

86

103

5A8

Greenwich PCT

135

147

155

5NM

Halton and St Helens PCT

100

326

672

5H1

Hammersmith and Fulham PCT

94

200

135

5QC

Hampshire PCT

1,076

1,940

1,685

5C9

Haringey PCT

185

238

285

5K6

Harrow PCT

306

320

246

5D9

Hartlepool PCT

152

125

112

5P8

Hastings and Rother PCT

56

155

89

5A4

Havering PCT

316

318

262

5MX

Heart of Birmingham PCT

61

57

101

5CN

Herefordshire PCT

52

218

267

5NQ

Heywood, Middleton and Rochdale PCT

82

139

104

5AT

Hillingdon PCT

290

376

281

5HY

Hounslow PCT

294

292

181

5NX

Hull PCT

168

65

190

5QT

Isle of Wight NHS PCT

57

253

214

5K8

Islington PCT

127

95

103

5LA

Kensington and Chelsea PCT

140

205

200

5A5

Kingston PCT

71

83

111

5N2

Kirklees PCT

125

299

413

5J4

Knowsley PCT

56

148

183

5LD

Lambeth PCT

120

176

174

5N1

Leeds PCT

520

784

774

5PC

Leicester City PCT

103

162

213

5PA

Leicestershire County and Rutland PCT

187

312

426

5LF

Lewisham PCT

113

145

206

5N9

Lincolnshire PCT

431

239

625

5NL

Liverpool PCT

225

285

639

5GC

Luton PCT

130

125

96

5NT

Manchester PCT

128

219

354

5L3

Med way PCT

117

99

139

5PX

Mid Essex PCT

273

201

184

5KM

Middlesbrough PCT

88

148

118

5CQ

Milton Keynes PCT

63

65

81

5D7

Newcastle PCT

66

106

99

5C5

Newham PCT

55

223

149

5PQ

Norfolk PCT

233

339

416

5PW

North East Essex PCT

56

93

83

TAN

North East Lincolnshire Care Trust Plus

n/a

132

192

5AN

North East Lincolnshire PCT

99

n/a

n/a

5NF

North Lancashire PCT

246

330

491

5EF

North Lincolnshire PCT

60

143

238

5M8

North Somerset PCT

34

129

218

5PH

North Staffordshire PCT

121

146

202

5E1

North Tees PCT

96

221

308

5D8

North Tyneside PCT

102

170

152

5NV

North Yorkshire and York PCT

245

386

757

5PD

Northamptonshire PCT

397

476

783

TAC

Northumberland Care Trust

213

216

277

5EM

Nottingham City PCT

87

172

205

5N8

Nottinghamshire County PCT

212

433

659

5J5

Oldham PCT

122

244

282

5QE

Oxfordshire PCT

145

441

563

5PN

Peterborough PCT

123

66

124

5F1

Plymouth PCT

100

398

649

5FE

Portsmouth City PCT

190

222

341

5NA

Red bridge PCT

138

179

161

5QR

Redcar and Cleveland PCT

58

65

72

5M6

Richmond and Twickenham PCT

104

105

95

5H8

Rotherham PCT

82

164

71

5F5

Salford PCT

35

242

208

5PF

Sandwell PCT

333

92

131

5NJ

Sefton PCT

131

174

168

5N4

Sheffield PCT

99

414

670

5M2

Shropshire County PCT

80

280

580

TAM

Solihull Care Trust

125

149

178

5QL

Somerset PCT

120

254

452

5M1

South Birmingham PCT

76

115

209

5P1

South East Essex PCT

111

38

114

5A3

South Gloucestershire PCT

77

135

189

5PK

South Staffordshire PCT

195

310

535

5KG

South Tyneside PCT

156

89

96

5PY

South West Essex PCT

67

49

43

5L1

Southampton City PCT

275

232

236

5LE

Southwark PCT

119

151

128

5F7

Stockport PCT

82

192

339

5PJ

Stoke on Trent PCT

133

141

168

5PT

Suffolk PCT

49

190

299

5KL

Sunderland Teaching PCT

203

257

275

5P5

Surrey PCT

388

641

739

5M7

Sutton and Merton PCT

187

216

251

5K3

Swindon PCT

54

73

156

5LH

Tameside and Glossop PCT

103

195

200

5MK

Telford and Wrekin PCT

180

221

324

TAL

Torbay Care Trust

130

154

146

5C4

Tower Hamlets PCT

74

71

114

5NR

Trafford PCT

56

60

90

5N3

Wakefield District PCT

159

190

235

5M3

Walsall PCT

47

272

345

5NC

Waltham Forest PCT

109

131

183

5LG

Wandsworth PCT

59

94

111

5J2

Warrington PCT

105

113

215

5PM

Warwickshire PCT

311

659

881

5PV

West Essex PCT

90

93

113

5P4

West Hertfordshire PCT

290

283

315

5P9

West Kent PCT

305

225

372

5P6

West Sussex PCT

365

592

207

5NN

Western Cheshire PCT

93

135

152

5LC

Westminster PCT

239

186

5

5QK

Wiltshire PCT

135

315

453

5NK

Wirral PCT

70

143

288

5MV

Wolverhampton City PCT

127

265

258

5PL

Worcestershire PCT

270

362

384


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