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Occupation orders made in England and Wales, by court area, 2003 - 08
Area 2003 2004 2005 2006 2007 2008

Avon and Somerset

155

170

149

166

161

123

Bedfordshire, Essex and Herts.

419

349

372

279

320

324

Birmingham, Coventry, Solihull and Warwickshire

223

283

240

239

247

157

Black Country, Staffordshire and West Mercia

545

447

425

373

304

185

Cambridgeshire, Norfolk and Suffolk

267

301

336

295

292

184

Cheshire and Merseyside

435

374

418

287

192

148

Cleveland, Durham and Northumbria

719

551

615

710

513

242

Cumbria and Lancashire

417

446

427

306

281

147

Derbyshire and Nottinghamshire

184

116

111

131

151

92

Devon and Cornwall

450

380

366

294

325

171

Dorset, Gloucestershire and Wiltshire

473

401

306

241

252

247

Greater Manchester

310

248

263

245

184

115

Hampshire and Isle of Wight

257

265

294

291

233

123

Humber and South Yorkshire

409

302

298

253

211

175

Kent

272

285

217

169

178

162

Lincolnshire, Leicestershire and Rutland and Northamptonshire

268

332

269

288

278

159

London Civil and Family

3,175

2,489

2,224

1,965

1,627

1,377

Mid and West Wales

115

68

80

72

92

75

North and West Yorkshire

437

417

464

543

437

328

North Wales

124

90

98

52

47

62

South East Wales

181

157

113

103

95

61

Surrey and Sussex

472

350

422

349

267

151

Thames Valley

486

347

378

328

258

291

England and Wales

10,793

9,168

8,885

7,979

6,945

5,099


Area level figures are not available before 2003. However, the following table gives, for each year from 1998 to 2002, the most recently published national figures.

Occupation orders applied for, and made, in England and Wales between 1998 and 2002
Applications made Orders made

1998

11,147

9,023

1999

9,757

8,319

2000

10,295

9,736

2001

10,692

9,789

2002

11,924

11,763


General Election 2010: Young People

Mr. Cash: To ask the Secretary of State for Justice what steps have been taken to encourage 18 to 24 year-olds to vote in the next general election. [309860]

Mr. Wills: Section 69 of the Electoral Administration Act 2006 places local electoral officers under a duty to encourage participation at statutory elections. The Government have established the electoral participation fund to support electoral officers undertaking novel and innovative projects, including activities to support the participation of young people.

In addition, under section 13 of the Political Parties, Elections and Referendums Act 2000, the Electoral Commission has a statutory responsibility to run public awareness campaigns to promote voter registration and to provide information on electoral events. I have been informed by the Electoral Commission that they will be running a public awareness campaign in the lead up to the next general election to encourage people to register to vote. By selecting particular media channels, the campaign will be targeted at groups less likely to be on the electoral register, particularly 18 to 24 year-olds. The campaign will include television, radio and press advertising, along with work on social networking websites. Through its partnership grants programme, the Electoral Commission has also funded other organisations working to increase democratic participation among young people, including Banardos, the Prince's Trust and UK Youth Parliament.

Homicide

Andrew Rosindell: To ask the Secretary of State for Justice how many of those convicted of murder since 1997 have been placed in open prisons; and how many such offenders have escaped. [302916]

Maria Eagle: Figures on the number of prisoners convicted of murder since 1997 who have been placed in open conditions is not available centrally and could be obtained only at disproportionate cost by accessing the individual record of each such prisoner.

Transfer of any prisoner to open conditions will only take place if continued detention in closed conditions is no longer necessary for the protection of the public. Open conditions allow prisoners to find work, re-establish family ties and reintegrate into the community. All these are essential components for successful resettlement and an important factor in protecting the public.

Data on absconds from open prison by index offence type have been recorded centrally since 1 April 2004. Between April 2004 and November 2009, 69 prisoners convicted of murder have absconded from open prisons. Three of these prisoners are recorded as still being at large.

The rate of abscond from open prisons continues to fall and absconds are now at their lowest level since centralised reporting of this type of incident began in 1995.

Hotels

Mr. Drew: To ask the Secretary of State for Justice how many hotel room nights were booked by officials in (a) his Department and (b) its agencies in each year since 2007; and how much (i) his Department and (ii) its agencies spent on fees of third-party agents in relation to booking hotel accommodation in each such year. [309319]

Mr. Straw: The information requested is set out as follows:

Number of rooms booked

The number of hotel rooms booked by the Ministry and its agencies can only be determined at disproportionate cost. Although bookings should normally be made through contracted booking agents, they may also be made by individuals directly with the costs being reimbursed through expense claims or met through the Government Procurement Card. To determine the number of hotel night rooms booked by individuals directly would involve examination of thousands of individual claims and statements held locally across the department and its agencies.

All hotel bookings by Ministers and civil servants are undertaken in accordance with the Ministerial Code and the Civil Service Management Code respectively. The annual departmental resource accounts disclose expenditure on "travel, subsistence and hospitality" in notes 10 (administration expenditure) and 11 (programme
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expenditure). Resource accounts were published by the Ministry of Justice for 2007-08 and 2008-09 and prior to that by the Ministry's predecessor, the Department for Constitutional Affairs. All published accounts can be found at:

Fees paid to booking agents

The majority of hotel bookings are arranged through travel management companies employed by the Ministry to obtain best value for money options. All other expenditure is incurred only on production of valid receipts.

The Ministry has contracts with two designated booking agents working for different parts of the business. Booking agents are contracted to secure the best value for money rates available. The Ministry does not pay fees directly to either service provider. The booking agents are remunerated instead through commission paid by the hotels themselves. The Ministry does not have any
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details about the amount of commission earned by booking agents acting in its behalf.


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