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3 Nov 2010 : Column 861W—continued


Human Trafficking

Keith Vaz: To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department how many convictions there have been for offences related to human trafficking in each police force area in each of the last five years. [17626]

Damian Green: Figures from the UK Human Trafficking Centre for convictions for trafficking-related offences by force area are set out in the following tables. These figures cover the period up to the end of June 2010.

Trafficking convictions only by force and year as at 30 June 2010
Convictions for labour exploitation
Year of sentence
Force 2005 2006 2007 2008 2009 2010 Total

Metropolitan Police

0

0

1

0

0

0

1

North Yorkshire

0

0

0

0

0

(1)3

3

Sussex

0

0

0

0

2

0

2

Thames Valley

0

0

0

4

0

0

4

Total

0

0

1

4

2

3

10

(1 )Two of these convictions were for conspiracy to traffick

3 Nov 2010 : Column 862W

Convictions for sexual exploitation
Year of sentence
Force 2004 2005 2006 2007 2008 2009 2010 Total

Avon and Somerset

0

0

0

0

0

0

1

1

Bedfordshire

0

0

0

0

1

0

0

1

Cheshire

0

0

0

0

0

1

0

1

Devon and Cornwall

0

0

0

0

0

4

0

4

Dorset

0

1

0

0

0

0

0

1

Durham

0

0

1

0

0

0

0

1

Greater Manchester Police

0

0

1

3

3

9

0

16

Hampshire

0

0

0

1

0

1

0

2

Kent

0

0

2

1

1

0

0

4

Lancashire

0

0

0

4

1

0

0

5

Leicestershire

0

0

2

2

0

0

0

4

Metropolitan Police

1

10

11

1

11

9

4

47

Northumbria

0

0

1

0

0

0

0

1

PSNI

0

0

0

0

1

0

0

1

South Wales

0

2

0

2

2

0

0

6

South Yorkshire

2

6

0

0

2

5

0

15

Suffolk

0

0

0

0

0

1

0

1

Surrey

0

0

0

1

2

0

0

3

Sussex

0

0

0

0

1

1

0

2

Warwickshire

0

0

5

0

0

0

0

5

West Mercia

0

0

0

1

2

2

0

5

West Midlands

0

1

3

1

0

0

0

5

West Yorkshire

0

1

0

0

4

0

0

5

Wiltshire

0

0

0

0

(1)3

0

0

3

Total

3

21

26

17

34

33

5

139

(1 )All three convictions were for conspiracy to traffick.

Convictions not for trafficking but related to the original trafficking offence by force and year as at 30 June 2010
Labour e xploitation
Year of sentence
Force 2005 2006 2007 2008 2009 2010 Total

Bedfordshire

0

0

0

1

0

0

1

Derbyshire

0

0

0

0

0

3

3

Durham

0

0

0

0

0

1

1

Leicestershire

0

1

0

0

0

0

1

Metropolitan Police

0

1

0

1

2

1

5

North Yorkshire

0

0

1

1

0

0

2

Northamptonshire

0

0

0

0

0

1

1

West Midlands

0

0

0

0

1

0

1

West Yorkshire

0

0

0

0

0

1

1

Total

0

2

1

3

3

7

16


3 Nov 2010 : Column 863W

Sexual exploitation
Year of sentence
Force 2004 2005 2006 2007 2008 2009 2010 Total

Cambridgeshire

0

0

1

1

2

0

0

4

Cleveland

0

0

0

0

0

1

0

1

Derbyshire

0

0

0

0

1

0

0

1

Devon and Cornwall

0

0

0

0

0

5

0

5

Dyfed-Powys

0

0

0

0

0

0

3

3

Essex

0

0

0

0

2

0

0

2

Gloucestershire

0

0

0

0

0

1

0

1

Greater Manchester Police

0

0

0

3

9

3

0

15

Hampshire

0

1

0

0

0

0

0

1

Kent

0

0

0

0

0

2

0

2

Lancashire

0

0

1

1

0

0

0

2

Leicestershire

0

0

0

0

0

0

1

1

Lincolnshire

0

0

0

0

0

0

1

1

Metropolitan Police

1

2

4

2

13

7

3

32

Norfolk

0

0

0

0

1

1

0

2

Northumbria

0

0

1

0

0

0

0

1

Nottinghamshire

0

0

0

0

3

1

0

4

PSNI

0

0

0

0

1

0

0

1

South Wales

0

0

1

0

1

0

0

2

South Yorkshire

0

0

0

0

0

0

1

1

Surrey

0

0

0

3

0

0

0

3

West Mercia

0

0

0

2

0

2

0

4

West Midlands

0

0

2

0

0

1

0

3

West Yorkshire

0

0

0

1

1

0

0

2

Total

1

3

10

13

34

24

9

94


Illegal Immigrants

Mr Woolas: To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department what recent discussions she has had with private contractors on procedures for escorting illegal immigrants during their removal from the UK. [19064]

Damian Green: The Home Secretary has not discussed with private contractors any procedures for escorting illegal immigrants during removal from the UK.

I had a meeting with representatives from G4S Care and Justice Services in September 2010.

In September, officials together with G4S and representatives from the Independent Monitoring Board held a bi-monthly meeting to discuss issues affecting the general wellbeing of detainees.

A monthly meeting between UK Border Agency officials and G4S to review operations and performance was held on 20 October. Similar discussions have taken place in October with SERCO and Molynes, who provide escorting services at times of high demand.

Metropolitan Police: Human Trafficking

Keith Vaz: To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department what recent representations she has received from the Metropolitan police force on the conviction of people arrested for human trafficking offences. [19472]


3 Nov 2010 : Column 864W

Damian Green: I have received no such representation.

Sex Offenders Act 1997

Harriett Baldwin: To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department whether she plans to bring forward proposals to amend the Sex Offenders Act 1997 before Easter 2012. [19979]

James Brokenshire: The Sex Offenders Act 1997 was repealed and replaced by the Sexual Offences Act 2003 which brought together a range of tools and powers for the police and courts to impose to manage sex offenders as well as significant enhancements to the notification requirements (commonly referred to as the sex offenders' register).

In light of the Supreme Court judgment in April 2010, which found that the lifetime notification requirements in the Sexual Offences Act 2003 are incompatible with article eight of the ECHR. Section 82 of the Sexual Offences Act 2003 will need to be amended to remedy this incompatibility and we will bring forward proposals in due course.

UK Border Agency: Finance

Mr Woolas: To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department how much capital funding has been allocated to the UK Border Agency for the period from 2010 to 2015. [19892]

Damian Green: The UK Border Agency's future capital funding for the period 2010-15 has not yet been allocated following the comprehensive spending review announced on 20th October 2010.

Our priorities remain to secure the border and control migration. We are committed to programmes such as e-Borders and the Immigration Case Working system that will help to reduce the threat of terrorism, crime and immigration abuse and replace costly and outmoded paper work, respectively.

These programmes will help improve our productivity and efficiency and will mean that we can target our resources on those people likely to cause most harm to the UK.

UK Border Agency: Standards

Conor Burns: To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department what the UK Border Agency's performance was against each of its service level standards at each major port of entry in the latest period for which figures are available. [21586]

Damian Green: We have interpreted the question as asking about our performance against queue targets within service level agreements published the UK Border Agency's customer charter and those held with local port operators.

Our national service standard for queues is to process 95% of EEA passengers within 25 minutes and non-EEA passengers within 45 minutes.

The UK Border Agency and port operators are also jointly committed to reduce waiting times through performance levels agreed via individual port service level agreements.


3 Nov 2010 : Column 865W

The following table outlines the percentage of measured queues that have met the levels set in local service level agreements and performance against the nationally agreed service level standards (in brackets) for the period 1 April 2010 to 30 September 2010.

Percentage
Region EEA performance Non-EEA performance

Central

90.7 (96.5)

95.2 (97.7)

South and Europe

96.1 (98.5)

94.3 (98.3)

Heathrow

95.1 (99.5)

84.4 (93.8)

North

98.2 (98.5)

99.6 (97.6)

National

95.3 (98.5)

89.5 (96.5)

Notes: 1. Includes Stansted, Luton, Birmingham, Cardiff, East Midlands, London City and Norwich and Harwich. 2. Includes Gatwick, Calais, Coquelles, Bristol, Bournemouth, Southampton, Exeter, Boulogne, Brussels, Dunkerque, Lille, Newhaven, Paris, Portsmouth, Plymouth. 3. Includes Manchester, Liverpool, Glasgow, Edinburgh, Newcastle, Aberdeen, Belfast, Blackpool, Doncaster, Durham Tees, Humberside, Leeds, Prestwick.

Cabinet Office

Marriage: Cousins

Jim Fitzpatrick: To ask the Minister for the Cabinet Office whether the Office for National Statistics collects figures on the number of first cousin marriages. [21243]

Mr Hurd: The information requested falls within the responsibility of the UK Statistics Authority. I have asked the authority to reply.

Letter from Stephen Penneck, dated November 2010:

Public Bodies: Assets

Stephen Barclay: To ask the Minister for the Cabinet Office what steps he has taken to identify the assets of public bodies to be disposed of as a result of the implementation of his policy on public bodies reform. [21601]

Mr Maude: Implementing the public body reform proposals announced on 14 October, including identifying assets, is the responsibility of the Government Departments that sponsor public bodies. Each Department is currently working with its public bodies to develop plans for implementation.

Questionnaires: Public Expenditure

Christopher Pincher: To ask the Minister for the Cabinet Office what recent estimate he has made of expenditure by Government Departments on questionnaires which include requests for personal information. [20677]


3 Nov 2010 : Column 866W

Mr Hurd: The information requested falls within the responsibility of the UK Statistics Authority. I have asked the authority to reply.

Letter from Stephen Penneck, dated November 2010:

Health

Antidepressants

Valerie Vaz: To ask the Secretary of State for Health what recent discussions he has had with the Medicines and Healthcare Products Regulatory Agency on the antidepressant reboxetine. [21145]

Mr Simon Burns: There have been no recent discussions between the Secretary of State for Health and the Medicines and Healthcare products Regulatory Agency (MHRA) in relation to the antidepressant reboxetine. The MHRA keeps all emerging data in relation to medicinal products, including reboxetine, under close review. Any new data are carefully evaluated and where necessary prescribing advice is updated to reflect the new evidence.

Breast Cancer: Screening

Mr Brine: To ask the Secretary of State for Health if he will commission research into the merits of extending breast screening invitations to women aged up to 79 years. [21349]

Paul Burstow: The Cancer Reform Strategy (CRS) included the commitment that the NHS Breast Screening Programme (NHS BSP) would be extended to women aged 47 to 73. In June this year, we confirmed in the revision to the NHS Operating Framework 2010-11 that all local breast screening programmes should begin the extension in 2010-11.

To give directly comparable data on the effectiveness of screening the extended age ranges, the extension to the breast screening programme is being randomised, with half of women being invited at age 47-49 and half at age 71-73. Decisions will be taken on extending the programme further once the results of the randomisation project are known.

In the meantime, women over the age of 70 can request free three-yearly screening and should receive the leaflet 'Over 70? You are still entitled to breast screening' (developed jointly with Age UK) to advise them of this fact when they leave the NHS BSP. NHS Cancer Screening Programmes has commissioned research to examine if more can be done to raise awareness of this right.

Care Homes: Registration

John McDonnell: To ask the Secretary of State for Health what recent representations he has received on the effects of the introduction on standards of care and safety in residential homes of the 1 October deadline for full registration of residential care homes with the Care Quality Commission; and if he will make a statement. [21020]


3 Nov 2010 : Column 867W

Anne Milton: The Care Quality Commission (CQC) is the independent regulator of health and adult social care services in England. From 1 October 2010, independent healthcare and adult social care providers were brought within the new registration framework under the Health and Social Care Act 2008, which replaced registration under Care Standards Act 2000. Providers of regulated activities must be registered with CQC, and comply with registration requirements regulations that set out essential levels of safety and quality.

The Department has received two letters about the effects of the introduction of the new registration framework. The first letter was from the trade union Unison raising issues linked to staff morale at CQC and the effectiveness of the new registration process. The second letter was from Merton MIND Management Committee expressing concerns about providers being aware of the introduction of the new standards of care and safety in residential homes and the timescales, cost and quality of inspections under the new standards.

Both letters were brought to the attention of CQC.

Care Homes: Standards

John McDonnell: To ask the Secretary of State for Health (1) what recent assessment he has made of the effectiveness of the Care Quality Commission in the inspection and monitoring of standards in residential care homes; and if he will make a statement; [21048]

(2) what assessment he has made of the effectiveness of using enforcement actions by the Care Quality Commission to ensure the health and wellbeing of residents in residential care homes where serious shortcomings have been identified by the Commission. [21050]

Anne Milton: The Care Quality Commission (CQC) is the independent regulator of health and adult social care, established by the Health and Social Care Act 2008. CQC is accountable to the Secretary of State for discharging its functions, duties and powers effectively and economically.

The Department monitors CQC's financial and operational performance and risks at a general and strategic level. It does not assess CQC's inspection or monitoring of specific residential care homes.

The new registration system for private and voluntary health care and adult social care providers of regulated activities under the Health and Social Care Act 2008 came into effect from 1 October this year. For residential care homes, the new registration system replaces the previous registration system under the Care Standards Act (CSA) 2000.

To be registered and remain registered, providers must comply with registration requirements relating to essential levels of safety and quality, which are set out in regulations. Failure to comply with the requirements is an offence, and CQC has a range of independent enforcement powers that it can exercise. CQC's enforcement policy sets out how it uses its enforcement powers-this has been developed, consulted on, and published by CQC. It replaces the previous enforcement policy CQC had developed to support the CSA registration system.

CQC is required to publish a report of every inspection it carries out. It also publishes an annual report.


3 Nov 2010 : Column 868W

John McDonnell: To ask the Secretary of State for Health what recent assessment he has made of the adequacy of the number of Care Quality Commission inspectors to monitor residential care homes and agencies. [21051]

Anne Milton: The Care Quality Commission (CQC) is the independent regulator of health and adult social care, established by the Health and Social Care Act 2008. The CQC is accountable to the Secretary of State for discharging its functions, duties and powers effectively and economically.

The Department monitors CQC's financial and operational performance and risks at a general and strategic level. It does not assess CQC's inspection or monitoring of specific residential care homes.

CQC is responsible for developing and consulting on its methodology for assessing whether providers are meeting registration requirements regulations. Following a 12-week formal consultation, it published its "Guidance About Compliance" in March 2010. This document explains in more detail how providers can comply with the registration requirements regulations.

In relation to inspection or monitoring of registered providers, CQC has advised us that its frontline staff have an average caseload of 50 services, and that it ensures flexibility around resource across the organisation to support demand at times of peak activity.

Care Quality Commission: Job Satisfaction

John McDonnell: To ask the Secretary of State for Health what recent reports he has received on staff morale amongst staff working for the Care Quality Commission; and if he will make a statement. [21047]

Anne Milton: The Department has received one letter about staff morale among staff working for the Care Quality Commission (CQC) from the trade union Unison. The letter was responded to by the Minister of State for Care Services.

The Department has not received any other reports regarding staff morale at CQC.

CQC is the independent regulator of health and adult social care. As such, it has its own procedures in place to respond to staff concerns. CQC has advised that it holds regular staff forums to look at issues that have been raised and is working with staff to resolve them in future, while ensuring its regulatory function continues to operate effectively.

Clinical Trials

Valerie Vaz: To ask the Secretary of State for Health what assessment he has made of the merits of publishing the results of drug trials; and what assessment he has made of the adequacy of the extent to which such results are disseminated. [21144]

Mr Simon Burns: UK Public Assessment Reports and EU Public Assessment Reports provide information on the results of trials conducted in support of licensed medicinal products and are published on the Medicines and Healthcare products Regulatory Agency website at:


3 Nov 2010 : Column 869W

and on the European Medicines Agency website at:

The law relating to reporting safety issues was strengthened following the concerns around GlaxoSmithKline's reporting of the use of paroxetine in children. The Medicines for Human Use (Marketing Authorisations Etc.) Amendment Regulations 2008 (SI 3097/2008) added to the existing provisions and state explicitly that marketing authorisation holders should report to the competent authority information from clinical trials outside the licensed indication, and information arising from third countries and provide a timescale for the reporting of such information.

The Government support the funding of UK PubMed Central:

a free online repository of biomedical research including clinical trial information and the development of the UK Clinical Trials Gateway to make information about clinical trials available to members of the public and clinicians so that they may participate in research appropriate to them.

The EudraCT database that holds protocol information on all trials of medicinal products conducted in any EU member state is accessible only to Competent Authorities of the EU member states, the European Medicines Agency and the European Commission. From early 2011, it will be providing publicly accessible protocol information for all trials approved in Europe other than trials in healthy volunteers.

Diseases: Health Services

Rosie Cooper: To ask the Secretary of State for Health what steps he plans to take to include provision for rare and complex conditions in his proposed NHS Outcomes Framework. [20984]

Mr Simon Burns: We are developing an NHS Outcomes Framework, which will measure the overall progress of the national health service in delivering better health outcomes for patients.

While it will be important to ensure that the national framework includes a balanced set of outcome goals, it can never be comprehensive in terms of setting specific outcomes for all diseases and conditions. Nevertheless, the consultation proposals set out in "Liberating the NHS: Transparency in Outcomes-a framework for the NHS", represented a deliberate attempt to make sure that the breadth of NHS activity was covered by structuring the framework around five broad outcome goals or domains, with overarching indicators to measure progress in each. Below this, the proposed NHS Commissioning Board will be under a duty to ensure that a comprehensive service is commissioned, including for patients with rare and complex conditions and will be able to commission the National Institute for Health and Clinical Excellence to develop quality standards to help it in fulfilling this duty.

The Department is currently analysing responses to the consultation ahead of publishing the first NHS Outcomes Framework later in the year.


3 Nov 2010 : Column 870W

Eyesight: Health Services

Stephen Barclay: To ask the Secretary of State for Health what recent discussions his Department has had with representatives of the optical sector on the development of community eye care services. [21598]

Mr Simon Burns: Departmental officials have regular meetings with representatives of the optical sector, as well as organisations representing service users and professionals.

Stephen Barclay: To ask the Secretary of State for Health what plans he has to include (a) treatment of (i) glaucoma, (ii) age-related macular degeneration and (iii) diabetic retinopathy and (b) other eye care services within the scope of personal health budgets. [21599]

Mr Simon Burns: Personal health budgets are currently being piloted; 63 areas are actively involved in the pilot programme, involving around half the primary care trusts in England.

Individual pilot sites are free to decide which conditions or services to cover. The pilots are exploring personal health budgets across a wide range of long-term health conditions, but none of the sites are currently focusing on glaucoma, age-related macular degeneration, diabetic retinopathy or other ophthalmic services.

However, as the Government said in the White Paper, 'Equity and Excellence: Liberating the NHS', we believe personal health budgets have great potential to help improve outcomes and promote integration between services by putting individuals in control. We are encouraging further pilots to come forward, and would welcome any proposals from new or existing pilot sites.

Stephen Barclay: To ask the Secretary of State for Health what steps he plans to take to encourage collaboration between GP commissioning consortia and local optical committees. [21600]

Mr Simon Burns: Local optical committees may prove to be an effective source of advice for general practitioner (GP) commissioning consortia. It will be for local GP commissioners to determine how to collaborate with their local optical committee, service users and other professionals in deciding how to commission local eye care services.

Stephen Barclay: To ask the Secretary of State for Health what his policy is on the representation of local optical committees on local health and well-being boards. [21602]

Mr Simon Burns: The Department's consultation on the Government's White Paper 'Equity and Excellence: Liberating the NHS' closed on 5 October, and the consultation on associated proposals for Increasing Democratic Legitimacy in Health, Transparency in Outcomes: A Framework, Commissioning for Patients and Regulating Healthcare Providers finished on 11 October. One of the subjects for consultation was the membership of the proposed Health and Wellbeing Boards and the flexibilities they should have to specify membership as appropriate locally. The Department is currently considering the responses to the consultations.


3 Nov 2010 : Column 871W

Health: Children

Amber Rudd: To ask the Secretary of State for Health (1) how many children under five years whose mother was aged 19 years or under at birth were diagnosed with health problems in (a) Hastings and Rye and (b) nationally in the latest period for which figures are available; [20737]

(2) how many children under five years old were diagnosed with health problems in (a) Hastings and Rye and (b) nationally in the latest period for which figures are available. [20738]

Anne Milton: The information requested is not collected centrally.

For information about children diagnosed with health problems in her constituency, the hon. Member may wish to contact Hastings and Rother Primary Care Trust.

HIV Infection

Conor Burns: To ask the Secretary of State for Health what recent estimate he has made of the proportion of people living with HIV in the UK who are undiagnosed; and what steps he plans to take to reduce that proportion. [21384]

Anne Milton: In 2008, there were an estimated 83,000 people living with HIV (both diagnosed and undiagnosed). Over a quarter (27%, 22,400) of people were estimated to be undiagnosed. The Health Protection Agency will publish 2009 estimates later this year.

The Department is funding eight projects to assess the feasibility and acceptability of HIV testing in services other than antenatal and sexual health services. Three of the pilots are in hospitals, three in community settings and two are in primary care settings. An interim report will be published later this year and a full report will be produced in 2011.

Hospitals: Construction

Mr Bone: To ask the Secretary of State for Health what the mechanism will be for the establishment of a new NHS hospital following the ending of strategic health authorities and primary care trusts. [20977]

Mr Simon Burns: The Government's strategy is to give responsibility for commissioning most hospital and other health care services to general practitioner (GP)-led commissioning consortiums, so that commissioning decisions better reflect the needs of patients. GP consortiums will be accountable to an independent NHS Commissioning Board for the health outcomes they achieve for patients. Autonomous providers including NHS foundation trusts, will be free to make their own investment as long as their schemes are clinically driven and affordable.

Maternity Services: Huddersfield

Jason McCartney: To ask the Secretary of State for Health how many mothers gave birth in the Huddersfield Royal Infirmary Birthing Centre between January and June 2010. [21111]


3 Nov 2010 : Column 872W

Mr Hurd: I have been asked to reply.

The information requested falls within the responsibility of the UK Statistics Authority. I have asked the authority to reply.

Letter from Stephen Penneck, dated November 2010:

Live births occurring in Huddersfield Royal Infirmary Birthing Centre in 2009
Period Number

1 January to 30 June 2009

294

1 July to 31 December 2009

292

Total 2009

586


Jason McCartney: To ask the Secretary of State for Health how many people were transferred from the Huddersfield Royal Infirmary Birthing Centre to other hospitals by emergency ambulance between January and June 2010; and to which hospitals were they transferred. [21112]

Mr Simon Burns: The information requested is not collected centrally. This information may be obtained directly from the Calderdale and Huddersfield NHS Foundation Trust.

Medical Records

Mr David Davis: To ask the Secretary of State for Health what estimate he has made of the average annual number of occasions on which a healthcare professional may seek to access patients' records via the summary care record database. [21499]

Mr Simon Burns: The Department does not hold information that would make it possible to make a meaningful estimate. However, we are confident that summary care records (SCRs) containing core patient information will prove valuable for patients needing emergency care. We anticipate that their use will increase as more SCRs are created and health care staff who provide emergency care are trained to access SCRs in appropriate situations to support safe care for patients.

Mr David Davis: To ask the Secretary of State for Health if he will take steps to require explicit opt-in consent from a patient to any (a) proposal or (b) request to add data to their summary care record. [21500]

Mr Simon Burns: The main recommendation of the recent review of the content of the summary care record (SCR), led by Sir Bruce Keogh, was that the core information should only include a patient's medications, allergies, and adverse reactions. Any additional information beyond this should only be added to the SCR with the explicit consent of the patient.


3 Nov 2010 : Column 873W

We firmly believe that it is for patients to decide if any additional information should be included in their SCR, supported by appropriate professionals. Following publication of the outcome of the SCR review a letter was sent by officials to each primary care trust (PCT) highlighting that any information added to a patient's SCR over and above the core information should only be done with the explicit consent of the patient. Where additional information has already been added to patients' SCRs, patient consent must be confirmed for the additional information to be retained. Where the explicit consent of the patient is not confirmed, PCTs will advise general practitioner practices to amend the SCR to hold only core information.

NHS: Accountability

Austin Mitchell: To ask the Secretary of State for Health what plans he has for public scrutiny and accountability mechanisms in respect of (a) foundation trusts and (b) GP commissioning. [19587]

Mr Simon Burns: The Government set out their proposals for future scrutiny and accountability of national health service foundation trusts and general practitioner consortiums in the 'Equity and excellence: Liberating the NHS' White Paper. Following consultation on the above, and in light of feedback received, the Government are considering the way forward for health scrutiny and accountability.

NHS: Redundancy

Ms Angela Eagle: To ask the Secretary of State for Health (1) if he will make an estimate of the number of (a) nurses, (b) doctors and (c) medical support staff likely to be made redundant as a result of the spending reductions proposed in the comprehensive spending review; [21578]

(2) if he will make an estimate of the number of redundancies likely to be made by the NHS as a result of the spending reductions proposed in the comprehensive spending review. [21579]

Mr Simon Burns: The precise numbers of doctors, nurses and support staff required over the next five years will not be known until the new organisations that will underpin the new system have been designed in more detail.

The Department is consulting on how the new organisations should be designed and, once the results of this are known, an impact assessment will be published.

Streptococcus

Nicholas Soames: To ask the Secretary of State for Health how many cases of group B streptococcus infection were recorded in each of the last five years; and what other data his Department collect on the incidence of such infections. [21084]

Anne Milton: This information is not routinely collected by the Department. However, the Health Protection Agency collects data on laboratory reports on blood
3 Nov 2010 : Column 874W
infections including Group B Streptococcus (GBS). The Health Protection Agency website at:

gives the number of reported GBS cases reported by laboratories as in the following table.

Cases

2004

1,176

2005

1,250

2006

1,442

2007

1,403

2008

1,550


Streptococcus: Pregnancy

Nicholas Soames: To ask the Secretary of State for Health (1) whether his Department has conducted a cost-benefit analysis of the introduction of routine screening of pregnant women for group B streptococcus; [21081]

(2) what estimate he has made of the cost of introducing a pilot screening programme for pregnant women to test for group B streptococcus and what analysis his Department has conducted to inform this estimate. [21085]

Anne Milton: The UK National Screening Committee (UK NSC) advises Ministers and the national health service in all four countries about all aspects of screening policy. The UK NSC reviewed the policy for screening for group b streptococcus (GBS) carriage in pregnancy in 2009 and concluded that the evidence did not support its introduction.

The UK NSC commissioned a clinical and cost effectiveness study comparing different approaches to GBS. The health technology assessment took this work forward on behalf of the UK NSC and published the results in 2007. The main conclusion was that there was considerable uncertainty on the most effective approach to GBS. The study results were considered during the policy review.

The Department has therefore not conducted a cost benefit analysis or estimated the cost of introducing a pilot screening programme.

The UK NSC will review its policy position again on GBS carriage in pregnancy screening in 2012 or earlier if any significant new peer reviewed evidence emerges.

Weather: Health Services

Andrew Jones: To ask the Secretary of State for Health what steps he is taking to equip the NHS to manage winter pressures in 2010-11. [20972]

Mr Simon Burns: The Department has worked with strategic health authorities to ensure the national health service has robust arrangements in place across local health and social care areas to deal with the additional pressures winter can bring. Since the autumn the NHS has been working with its partners locally to address the challenges they will face during the course of the forthcoming winter.


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