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9 Feb 2011 : Column 354W—continued


Energy and Climate Change

Departmental Information Officers

Dr Whiteford: To ask the Secretary of State for Energy and Climate Change how many (a) press officers, (b) internal communications officers, (c) external communications officers, (d) communications strategy officers and (e) other positions with a communications remit were employed by (i) his Department, (ii) its agencies and (iii) each other non-departmental public body sponsored by his Department on the most recent date for which figures are available. [38955]

Gregory Barker: As at the date of the last communications benchmarking exercise on 31 March 2010, DECC had 30 professional communicators, working across a range of disciplines.

As at the same date, the Nuclear Decommissioning Authority had 17 professional communicators. Figures for other NDPBs were not available.

DECC has no executive agencies.

Departmental Procurement

Jon Trickett: To ask the Secretary of State for Energy and Climate Change whether all new contracts his Department has tendered over £10,000 have been published with associated tender documents on the Contracts Finder website since its inception. [39220]

Gregory Barker: Since the inception of Contracts Finder the Department of Energy and Climate Change has advertised 22 procurements with a contract value of over £10,000 on the Suppy2Gov website. One complete set of tender documents has been placed on Contracts Finder. Currently there are no published contracts with associated tender documents on the Contracts Finder website.

Electric Cables

Tessa Munt: To ask the Secretary of State for Energy and Climate Change what discussions (a) Ministers and (b) officials in his Department have had with the national grid on its policy on undergrounding overhead high voltage electricity transmission lines. [39053]

Charles Hendry: Ministers and officials have ongoing discussions with national grid on its approach to undergrounding high voltage electricity transmission lines. These discussions have included a request from DECC to national grid to fund an independent and authoritative study to give clarity on the practicality, costs and impacts of undergrounding and subsea cabling as alternatives to overhead lines. This independent study is being undertaken by the Institution of Engineering and Technology and consultants KEMA, and will be
9 Feb 2011 : Column 355W
owned by those two organisations. DECC is also engaging with national grid in relation to its consultation on its approach to undergrounding, which was launched in December 2010.

Energy

Caroline Lucas: To ask the Secretary of State for Energy and Climate Change pursuant to the answer of 17 January 2011, Official Report, column 477W, on energy, what mechanisms officials will use to decide appropriate compensation and corresponding benefits; and how he plans to achieve consistency across the treatment of cases. [39331]

Charles Hendry: The Department will implement the policy of no subsidy for new nuclear power in line with the written ministerial statement made by the Secretary of State for Energy and Climate Change, my right hon. Friend the Member for Eastleigh (Chris Huhne) on 18 October 2010, Official Report, column 44WS.

Energy: Subsidies

Mr Thomas: To ask the Secretary of State for Energy and Climate Change what assessment he has made of the effectiveness of efforts to encourage the World Trade Organisation to promote transparency in energy subsidies; and if he will make a statement. [38138]

Mr Davey: I have been asked to reply.

As part of the World Trade Organisation's (WTO) Doha trade round, negotiations are taking place aimed at strengthening multilateral disciplines on trade distorting subsidies. These negotiations are ongoing.

The UK supports the EU position of seeking strengthened disciplines on trade distorting subsidies. Improving the notification of subsidies by WTO members would promote transparency and is an essential first step in securing greater multilateral control over trade distorting subsidies in all sectors, including those energy subsidies covered by WTO agreements.

Renewable Energy: Feed-in Tariffs

Philip Davies: To ask the Secretary of State for Energy and Climate Change what proportion of feed-in tariff payments for (a) solar and (b) wind installations have been paid on the measured input of electricity to the grid to date. [38268]

Charles Hendry: This information is not available within the Department until the end of year FITs Report is received from Ofgem. However, Ofgem have published data from the quarterly levelisation process up to 30 September 2010 which can be viewed at:

Third Internal Energy Package

Huw Irranca-Davies: To ask the Secretary of State for Energy and Climate Change when he expects to publish the guidance on the third party access requirement referred to in paragraph 5.16 of the Government's response to its consultation on the Implementation of the EU Third Internal Energy Package. [37841]


9 Feb 2011 : Column 356W

Charles Hendry: Guidance on third party access requirements for licence exempt gas and electricity distribution networks will be published as soon as possible after regulations have been laid.

Wind Power

Philip Davies: To ask the Secretary of State for Energy and Climate Change what estimate he has made of the cost of constructing fossil fuel power stations to compensate for the intermittency of wind power generation in the period up to 2030. [38393]

Charles Hendry: The Department has not provided estimates of the cost of constructing fossil fuel power stations to compensate for intermittency in the period out to 2030. These costs would depend on a wide range of factors including the total volume and mix of fossil fuel capacity required as well as infrastructure construction and supply chain costs.

Fossil fuel power stations are not the only way to provide back up for intermittent wind generation. There are a number of alternative solutions including responsive demand, interconnection and storage such as pumped storage, batteries and hydrogen, all of which are expected to play a role in the future energy mix.

The Department has however published a number of studies which give estimates of the total cost of fossil fuel capacity under a range of renewables scenarios. These studies, the Redpoint Analysis (2009) and UK Renewable Energy Strategy: Impact Assessment for the Centralised Electricity Sector, are available at:

In this wider context, the Government are currently consulting on future Electricity Market Reform. This consultation is available at:

Philip Davies: To ask the Secretary of State for Energy and Climate Change what estimate he has made of the likely cost per kilowatt hour of fossil fuel-powered generation to provide back-up for the intermittency of wind power generation in 2030. [38394]

Charles Hendry: The Department has not provided estimates of the cost per kilowatt hour of fossil generation in 2030 to provide back up to intermittency. In principle this would depend on a range of factors including the fixed costs of the plant, and the prevailing wholesale fuel price.

Fossil fuel power stations are not the only way to provide back up for intermittent wind generation. There are a number of alternative solutions including responsive demand, interconnection and storage such as pumped storage, batteries and hydrogen, all of which are expected to play a role in the future energy mix.

The Department has however published a number of studies which give estimates of the total cost of fossil fuel capacity under a range of renewables scenarios. These studies, the Redpoint Analysis (2009) and UK Renewable Energy Strategy: Impact Assessment for the Centralised Electricity Sector, are available at:


9 Feb 2011 : Column 357W

In this wider context, the Government are currently consulting on future Electricity Market Reform. This consultation is available at:

Cabinet Office

Charitable Donations

Chris Ruane: To ask the Minister for the Cabinet Office what assessment he has made of trends in charitable giving by (a) corporations and (b) individuals in the last 30 years. [35806]

Mr Hurd: The information is as follows:

Childbirth

John Pugh: To ask the Minister for the Cabinet Office which maternity units recorded fewer than 200 live births in the last 12 months for which figures are available. [39109]

Mr Hurd: I have been asked to reply.

The information requested falls within the responsibility of the UK Statistics Authority. I have asked the authority to reply.

Letter from Stephen Penneck, dated February 2011:


9 Feb 2011 : Column 358W
Maternity units in England and Wales where fewer than 200 live births occurred in 2009

Communal establishment name Town/c ity

1

Andover Birth Centre Andover War Memorial Hospital

Andover

2

Berwick Infirmary

Berwick-on-Tweed

3

Brecon War Memorial Hospital

Brecon

4

Bridgnorth Hospital

Northgate Bridgnorth

5

Bridgwater Hospital

Bridgwater

6

Bridlington and District Hospital

Bridlington

7

Bryn Beryl Hospital

Pwllheli

8

Chipping Norton War Memorial Hospital

Chipping Norton

9

Clacton and District Hospital

Clacton on Sea

10

Corbar Birth Centre Buxton Hospital

Buxton

11

Darley Birth Centre Whitworth Hospital

Matlock

12

Denbigh Infirmary

Denbigh

13

Dolgellau and Barmouth District Hospital

Dolgellau Gwynedd

14

Gilchrist Maternity Unit, Hartismere Hospital

Eye

15

Goole and District Hospital

Goole

16

Grantham and District Hospital

Grantham

17

Halstead Birthing Centre

Halstead

18

Helston Community Hospital

Helston

19

Hexham General Hospital

Hexham

20

Hillcrest Maternity Home

Alnwick

21

Holistic Birthing Centre

Northwich

22

Honiton Hospital

Honiton

23

Knighton Hospital

Knighton

24

Llandrindod Wells County War Memorial Hospital

Llandrindod Wells

25

Llanidloes War Memorial Hospital

Llanidloes

26

Ludlow Hospital (Maternity)

Ludlow

27

Malton Hospital

Malton

28

Montgomery County Infirmary

Llanllwchaiarn Newtown

29

Newton Abbot Hospital

Newton Abbot

30

Nuneaton Private Hospital

Nuneaton

31

Okehampton Community Hospital

Okehampton

32

Orthopaedic and District Hospital (Maternity)

Oswestry

33

Penrith Hospital

Penrith

34

St Marys Hospital

Isles of Scilly

35

St Peters Maternity Unit St Peters Hospital

Shepton Mallet

36

Tair Afon General Hospital

Aberdare

37

The Birth Centre, Tooting

London

38

The Fryatt Hospital

Harwich

39

The Wantage Hospital

Wantage

40

Tiverton and District Hospital

Tiverton

41

Tywyn and District War Memorial Hospital

Tywyn Gwynedd

42

Victoria Memorial Hospital

Welshpool

43

Wakefield Birth Centre

Wakefield

44

Wallingford Community Hospital

Wallingford

45

Whitby Community Hospital

Whitby

Note:
This list is based on number of births from January to December 2009. It is likely that some small maternity units will have closed since 2009 and others may have opened. The list includes both NHS and private maternity units.

9 Feb 2011 : Column 359W

Citizens Advice: Manpower

Chris Ruane: To ask the Minister for the Cabinet Office if he will take steps to support staffing levels in (a) advice bureaux and (b) other agencies which rely on volunteer staff. [38498]

Mr Hurd: Encouraging social action, including volunteering is one of the three aims of the Governments vision for a big society. In December 2010 the Government published the "Giving Green" paper, which sought to start a debate on how we can make social action a norm and encourage more people to give their time. The Green paper announced two new funds to increase volunteering which will support agencies that rely on volunteer staff. The two funds are:

Citizens Advice Bureaux were also able to apply to the £100 million transition fund which will help civil society organisations delivering front-line services to become more resilient in the changing funding environment. The first round of payments to successful applicants will be made by the end of March 2011.

In addition, the Cabinet Office is the lead coordinating body for the 2011 European year of volunteering. One of the main priorities for the year is to encourage and enable individuals to make a contribution within their communities and help social issues by volunteering.

Civic Society Initiatives

Chris Ruane: To ask the Minister for the Cabinet Office what comparative research his Department has (a) commissioned and (b) evaluated on approaches to civic society initiatives in other countries. [38467]

Mr Hurd: The Cabinet Office has not commissioned or formally evaluated research into approaches to civic society initiatives in other countries. However, the Department continues to look to other countries to identify examples of such initiatives, and to learn lessons in best practice to inform ongoing policy development in this area.

Community Relations

Chris Ruane: To ask the Minister for the Cabinet Office what research his Department has (a) commissioned and (b) evaluated on the effect of levels of inequality on levels of social cohesion and social trust. [38454]

Mr Hurd: The information requested is as follows:

Chris Ruane: To ask the Minister for the Cabinet Office what assessment he has made of relative levels of social capital in each socio-economic group. [38456]


9 Feb 2011 : Column 360W

Mr Hurd: The Cabinet Office has not made an assessment of relative levels of social capital among socio-economic groups.

Deaths: Carbon Monoxide

Chris Ruane: To ask the Minister for the Cabinet Office how many deaths attributable to poisoning from carbon monoxide there were in each age decile in each local authority area in each of the last 15 years. [38590]

Mr Hurd: The information falls within the responsibility of the UK Statistics Authority. I have asked the authority to reply.

Letter from Stephen Penneck, dated February 2011:

Table 1. Number of deaths with a cause of carbon monoxide poisoning, by age group, England and Wales, 1997 to 2009( 1,)( )( 2,)( )( 3)
Deaths (persons)

0-9 10-19 20-29 30-39 40-49 50-59 60-69 70-79 80+

1995

18

14

228

264

247

132

80

59

46

1996

18

18

204

257

243

126

71

58

52

1997

13

31

170

205

184

109

54

58

49

1998

10

11

120

197

154

114

48

52

35

1999

11

15

100

176

147

104

46

58

50

2000

12

12

91

154

101

92

38

39

37

2001

9

14

70

112

108

83

32

30

45

2002

10

7

49

112

119

79

31

18

27

2003

7

8

49

89

89

62

29

25

28

2004

7

8

47

104

77

53

28

28

22

2005

4

5

20

64

62

39

26

15

28

2006

12

5

12

51

79

51

16

19

16

2007

2

1

34

50

51

41

33

18

21

2008

2

0

13

31

58

52

23

13

26

2009

4

5

18

34

71

41

23

21

19

(1) Cause of death from carbon monoxide poisoning was defined using the International Classification of Diseases, Ninth Revision (ICD-9) code 986 for the years 1995 to 2000 and Tenth Revision (ICD-10) code T58 for the years 2001 to 2009, where these codes appeared as the secondary cause.
(2) Figures include deaths of non-residents.
(3) Figures are for deaths registered in each calendar year.

Deaths: Prostate Cancer

Mr Buckland: To ask the Minister for the Cabinet Office (1) how many deaths from prostate cancer there were in (a) England, (b) each primary care trust area and (c) each constituency in each year from 1997-98 to 2009-10; [38809]

(2) what the age-standardised mortality rate from prostate cancer was in (a) England, (b) each primary care trust area and (c) each constituency in each year from 1997-98 to 2009-10. [38811]

Mr Hurd: The information requested falls within the responsibility of the UK Statistics Authority. I have asked the authority to reply.


9 Feb 2011 : Column 361W

Letter from Stephen Penneck, dated February 2011:

Table 1. Number of deaths where prostate cancer was the underlying cause of death, England, 1997 to 2009( 1,)( )( 2,)( )( 3,)( )( 4)
Males

Deaths

1997

7,982

1998

8,074

1999

8,015

2000

7,761

2001

8,305

2002

8,471

2003

8,570

2004

8,531

2005

8,492

2006

8,506

2007

8,659

2008

8,597

2009

8,842

(1) Cause of death for prostate cancer was defined using the International Classification of Diseases, Ninth Revision (ICD-9) code 185 for the years 1997 to 2000, and Tenth Revision (ICD-10) code C61 from 2001 onwards. The introduction of ICD-10 in 2001 means that the numbers of deaths from this cause before 2001 are not completely comparable with later years.
(2) Based on boundaries as of 2010.
(3) Figures for England exclude deaths of non-residents.
(4) Figures are for deaths registered in each calendar year.


9 Feb 2011 : Column 362W
Table 4. Age-standardised mortality rates per 100,000 males, where prostate cancer was the underlyin g cause of death, England, 1997 to 2009( 1,)( )( 2,)( )( 3,)( )( 4,)( )( 5)
Males

Rate per 100,000

1997

28

1998

28

1999

27

2000

26

2001

27

2002

27

2003

27

2004

26

2005

26

2006

25

2007

25

2008

24

2009

24

1 Age-standardised mortality rates per 100,000 population, standardised to the European Standard Population. Age-standardised rates are used to allow comparison between populations which may contain different proportions of people of different ages.
2 Cause of death for prostate cancer was defined using the International Classification of Diseases, Ninth Revision (ICD-9) code 185 for the years 1997 to 2000, and Tenth Revision (ICD-10) code C61 from 2001 onwards. The introduction of ICD-10 in 2001 means that the numbers of deaths from this cause before 2001 are not completely comparable with later years.
(3) Based on boundaries as of 2010.
(4) Figures for England exclude deaths of non-residents.
(5) Figures are for deaths registered in each calendar year.

Mr Buckland: To ask the Minister for the Cabinet Office what the age-standardised incidence rate for prostate cancer is; and how many diagnoses of prostate cancer there were in (a) England, (b) each strategic health authority area, (c) each primary care trust area and (d) each parliamentary constituency in each year since 1997. [38810]

Mr Hurd: The information requested falls within the responsibility of the UK Statistics Authority. I have asked the authority to reply.

Letter from Stephen Penneck, dated February 2011:


9 Feb 2011 : Column 363W

9 Feb 2011 : Column 364W
Table 1. Age-standardised incidence rates per 100,000 population, prostate cancer, males, England, 1997 to 2008( 1, 2, 3)
England Cases per 100,000 (males)

1997

71

1998

72

1999

78

2000

85

2001

96

2002

96

2003

96

2004

103

2005

99

2006

103

2007

100

2008

98

(1) Age-standardised incidence rates per 100,000 population, standardised to the European Standard Population. Age-standardised rates are used to allow comparison between populations which may contain different proportions of people of different ages.
(2) Prostate cancer is coded as C61 in the International Classification of Diseases, Tenth Revision (ICD-10).
(3) Based on newly diagnosed cases registered in each calendar year.

Table 2 . Registrations of newly diagnosed cases of prostrate cancer, males, England, 1997 to 2008( 1, 2)
England Registrations (males)

1997

20,006

1998

20,480

1999

22,387

2000

24,593

2001

28,015

2002

28,246

2003

28,503

2004

30,975

2005

30,053

2006

31,476

2007

31,236

2008

30,893

(1) Prostate cancer is coded as C61 in the International Classification of Diseases, Tenth Revision (ICD-10).
(2) Based on newly diagnosed cases registered in each calendar year.

Table 3. Age-standardised incidence rates per 100,000 population, prostate cancer, males, strategic health authorities in England, 2002-08( 1, 2, 3, 4)
Cases per 100,000 (males)

2002 2003 2004 2005 2006 2007 2008

North East

90

97

86

93

86

87

83

North West

88

90

108

101

104

97

90

Yorkshire and the Humber

89

90

101

97

102

101

96

East Midlands

84

82

94

99

102

102

97

West Midlands

102

102

109

104

107

99

102

East of England

99

96

99

102

101

102

104

London

97

97

100

95

99

103

102

South East Coast

89

89

94

91

96

94

92

South Central

110

107

116

100

108

102

94

South West

110

111

116

104

111

112

106

(1) Age-standardised incidence rates per 100,000 population, standardised to the European Standard Population. Age-standardised rates are used to allow comparison between populations which may contain different proportions of people of different ages.
(2) Prostate cancer is coded as C61 in the International Classification of Diseases, Tenth Revision (ICD-10).
(3) Based on boundaries as of 2010.
(4) Based on newly diagnosed cases registered in each calendar year.

9 Feb 2011 : Column 365W

9 Feb 2011 : Column 366W

Table 4. Registrations of newly diagnosed cases of prostate cancer, males, strategic health authorities in England, 1997 to 2008( 1, 2, 3)
Males

1997 1998 1999 2000 2001 2002 2003 2004 2005 2006 2007 2008

North East

902

1,066

1,235

1,249

1,417

1,406

1,504

1,369

1,475

1,394

1,424

1,377

North West

2,555

2,627

2,841

3,107

3,659

3,535

3,632

4,403

4,183

4,334

4,081

3,876

Yorkshire and the Humber

1,861

1,828

1,943

2,399

2,678

2,664

2,713

3,063

2,968

3,175

3,179

3,050

East Midlands

1,465

1,531

1,751

1,973

2,162

2,194

2,161

2,543

2,694

2,847

2,888

2,818

West Midlands

2,093

2,254

2,416

2,745

3,109

3,257

3,303

3,564

3,457

3,591

3,371

3,506

East of England

2,286

2,289

2,646

2,986

3,290

3,396

3,341

3,492

3,617

3,675

3,733

3,945

London

2,616

2,678

2,768

2,843

3,155

3,199

3,184

3,296

3,152

3,260

3,397

3,377

South East Coast

2,102

2,018

2,264

2,341

2,522

2,382

2,415

2,548

2,470

2,634

2,623

2,613

South Central

1,491

1,651

1,831

2,074

2,392

2,407

2,368

2,615

2,279

2,499

2,416

2,302

South West

2,635

2,538

2,692

2,876

3,631

3,806

3,882

4,082

3,758

4,067

4,124

4,029

(1) Prostate cancer is coded as C61 in the International Classification of Diseases, Tenth Revision (ICD-10).
(2) Based on boundaries as of 2010.
(3) Based on newly diagnosed cases registered in each calendar year.

Ethnic Groups: Greater London

Stephen Hammond: To ask the Minister for the Cabinet Office (1) what his most recent estimate is of the ethnic minority population of each (a) borough and (b) ward in London; [38283]

(2) what estimate he has made of the size of the ethnic minority population of (a) London, (b) the London borough of Merton and (c) Merton Park ward; [38459]

(3) what his most recent estimate is of the number of people in each ethnic group in each council ward in the London borough of Merton. [38460]

Mr Hurd: The information requested falls within the responsibility of the UK Statistics Authority. I have asked the authority to reply.

Letter from Stephen Penneck, dated February 2011:

Annex


9 Feb 2011 : Column 367W
Table 1: Estimated 'ethnic minority' population( 1) of London and constituent local authorities, 2007( 2)
Thousand
Area Total population 'Ethnic minority' population( 1)

London

7,556.9

3,195.1

City of London

8.0

2.5

Barking and Dagenham

166.9

51.0

Barnet

329.7

141.9

Bexley

222.1

39.1

Brent

270.0

184.7

Bromley

300.7

55.2

Camden

231.9

110.5

Croydon

339.5

141.9

Ealing

305.3

165.7

Enfield

285.1

123.9

Greenwich

223.1

77.4

Hackney

209.7

108.1

Hammersmith and Fulham

172.5

67.8

Haringey

224.7

114.6

Harrow

214.6

114.5

Havering

228.4

31.0

Hillingdon

250.7

85.2

Hounslow

220.6

104.8

Islington

187.8

76.5

Kensington and Chelsea

178.6

88.2

Kingston upon Thames

157.9

46.9

Lambeth

273.2

121.4

Lewisham

258.5

115.8

Merton

199.3

79.5

Newham

249.6

168.9

Redbridge

254.4

124.6

Richmond upon Thames

180.0

45.8

Southwark

274.4

130.2

Sutton

185.9

40.1

Tower Hamlets

215.3

119.5

Waltham Forest

222.3

105.0

Wandsworth

281.8

94.2

Westminster

234.1

118.4

(1) 'Ethnic minority' is defined here as all ethnic groups other than 'white British'.
(2) Estimates relate to mid-year (30 June 2007).
Source:
Population Estimates by Ethnic Group, Office for National Statistics

Table 2: 2001 Census estimates of the 'ethnic minority' population( 1) of London, Merton and Merton Park W ard, 2001( 2)
Thousand
Area Total population 'Ethnic minority' population( 1)

London

7,172.1

2,884.2

Merton

187.9

67.5

Merton Park

9.1

2.9

(1) 'Ethnic minority' is defined here as all ethnic groups other than 'white British'.
(2) Estimates relate to Census day (29 April 2001).
Source:
Table KS06, 2001 Census, Office for National Statistics

Internet

Chris Ruane: To ask the Minister for the Cabinet Office what research his Department has (a) commissioned and (b) evaluated on the effect of use of the internet on levels of social capital. [38370]

Mr Hurd: The Cabinet Office has neither commissioned nor evaluated any such research.

Job Security

Chris Ruane: To ask the Minister for the Cabinet Office what research his Department has (a) commissioned and (b) evaluated on the effect of (i) economic trends and (ii) trends in job security on levels of social trust. [38458]

Mr Hurd: The information requested is as follows:

Mutual Pathfinder Fund

Chris Evans: To ask the Minister for the Cabinet Office how many applications his Department received to its mutual pathfinder fund to 31 January 2011. [38719]

Mr Hurd: The Cabinet Office does not have a specific initiative known as the 'mutual pathfinder fund'. However, there are two related areas of work which may be relevant:


9 Feb 2011 : Column 368W

The Mutual Support Programme:

Mutual Pathfinders:

New Businesses

Stephen Lloyd: To ask the Minister for the Cabinet Office how many new businesses have been established in each region since June 2010. [39187]

Mr Hurd: The information requested falls within the responsibility of the UK Statistics Authority. I have asked the authority to reply.

Letter from Stephen Penneck, dated February 2011:

Enterprise b irths 2009 by Government office region

Number

North East

6,625

North West

23,920

Yorkshire and The Humber

17,005

East Midlands

14,860

West Midlands

18,245

East of England

23,535

London

50,575

South East

36,320

South West

17,945

Wales

8,325

Scotland

14,725

Northern Ireland

3,945

Total

236,025


Occupations

Chris Ruane: To ask the Minister for the Cabinet Office what research his Department has (a) commissioned and (b) evaluated on levels of social trust in each major occupational group. [38316]

Mr Hurd: The information requested is as follows:


9 Feb 2011 : Column 369W

Social Trust

Chris Ruane: To ask the Minister for the Cabinet Office what assessment his Department has made of (a) levels of and (b) trends in social trust in the last 30 years. [38372]

Mr Hurd: The information is as follows:

Chris Ruane: To ask the Minister for the Cabinet Office what research his Department has (a) commissioned and (b) evaluated on levels of (i) formal and (ii) informal sociability in the last 30 years. [38374]

Mr Hurd: The Cabinet Office has neither commissioned nor evaluated any such research.

Chris Ruane: To ask the Minister for the Cabinet Office what assessment he has made of the potential contribution of social trust to the development of the big society initiative. [38377]

Mr Hurd: The big society is about building stronger communities, strengthening the links between individuals and enabling them to come together to solve problems in their local area. This will build on and develop existing levels of social trust, and Government will maintain ongoing relationships with communities as policy is developed.

Trading Systems

Chris Ruane: To ask the Minister for the Cabinet Office what assessment his Department has made of trends in the number of local exchange trading systems since 1990. [38496]

Mr Hurd: The Cabinet Office has made no such assessment.

Voluntary Organisations

Esther McVey: To ask the Minister for the Cabinet Office what assessment has been made of the relationship between the private and voluntary sectors as part of the Government's big society initiative. [38328]

Mr Hurd: The business community has a vital role in the development of the big society and already makes a significant contribution in supporting local voluntary and community organisations in a range of ways: sharing assets and expertise, philanthropic donations, and exchange of staff. For example, the Prime Minister has called on businesses to train 1,000 'Business Connectors' who can help voluntary and community organisations become more innovative and entrepreneurial.

Esther McVey: To ask the Minister for the Cabinet Office what account will be taken of corporate social responsibility as part of the Government's big society initiative. [38329]


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Mr Hurd: Business will play a crucial role in helping to build the big society: we need the commitment, creativity and innovation of businesses to help tackle the challenges that confront us. That is why the Government have launched 'Every Business Commits', which asks business to do its part not just in creating economic growth but also by adding its expertise to tackling social problems and building stronger communities. Every Business Commits goes beyond corporate social responsibility and calls on businesses to help create a more sustainable and community-centred approach to doing business. This might include investing in future skills, protecting the environment, supporting their local community, investing in employee wellbeing, and encouraging the development of small and medium-sized enterprises.

Chris Ruane: To ask the Minister for the Cabinet Office which organisations have participated in consultation exercises related to the Government's big society initiative; and if he will make a statement. [38461]

Mr Hurd: The Cabinet Office maintains close relationships with many organisations in relation to the big society. In particular, two recent Green Papers on 'Modernising Commissioning' and on 'Giving', and a consultation on 'Supporting a Stronger Civil Society' have drawn in a very good mix of responses from frontline civil society organisations, local authorities and other public sector organisations, private businesses and individuals, and academics.

Summaries of these consultations will be published in due course.

Chris Ruane: To ask the Minister for the Cabinet Office what (a) opinion polls and (b) research his Department has commissioned on its big society initiative; and if he will publish the results of each. [38468]

Mr Hurd: The Cabinet Office has not commissioned any opinion polls relating to Big Society. However, the Department is commissioning a series of evaluations to assess the effectiveness of policy initiatives relating to building a stronger civil society. For example, the Office for Civil Society is currently commissioning an evaluation of National Citizen Service; the flagship initiative to support young people in becoming active and responsible citizens. This evaluation is due to commence in spring 2011 and will assess the effectiveness of both the 2011 and 2012 pilots in building a more responsible, cohesive and engaged society.

It is currently too early to publish results from such research, however in line with the Government's commitment to transparency, all research reports will be fully published, as they become available, at:

Chris Ruane: To ask the Minister for the Cabinet Office how many officials in his Department are engaged in work related to the Government's big society initiative. [38469]

Mr Hurd: The Office for Civil Society (OCS) leads the Government's contribution to building the big society. It works right across Whitehall and beyond to translate
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the big society vision into practical policies and deliver a radical change in the relationship between the citizen and the state.

On 31 December 2010, 86 members of the OCS were working on the big society issues. Staff work on a broad range of policy areas and are currently engaged on piloting the National Citizens Service with 30,000 young people, building the big society bank, training 5,000 community organisers, delivering the £100 million Transition Fund as well as policy development in the areas of philanthropy and giving, reforming public services, charity law, volunteering, social enterprise and social investment.

Chris Ruane: To ask the Minister for the Cabinet Office what public consultation activity his Department is undertaking on the big society initiative; and how much his Department has allocated for such activities in (a) 2010-11 and (b) 2011-12. [38470]

Mr Hurd: The Cabinet Office maintains close relationships with key stakeholders as policy is developed.

The Giving Green Paper launched in December 2010 is a public consultation document that forms part of the Big Society approach. Anyone with an interest in this paper can respond by 9 March 2011. The Modernising Commissioning Green Paper consultation closed on 5 January 2011. The Supporting a Stronger Civil Society consultation closed on 6 January 2011.

The costs of these consultations are absorbed into the running costs of the Department, as an essential part of the policy development process.

Chris Ruane: To ask the Minister for the Cabinet Office what targets his Department has set to measure progress in its big society initiative. [38501]

Mr Hurd: The big society is about building stronger communities, strengthening the links between individuals and enabling them to come together to solve problems in their local area. There are no targets in place to measure big society, although officials are considering innovative ways of tracking the progress of big society, without imposing reporting burdens on local initiatives.

Chris Ruane: To ask the Minister for the Cabinet Office if he will assess the effects on the development of the Government's big society initiative of changes in the level of social cohesion in areas subject to de-industrialisation. [39011]

Andrew Stunell: I have been asked to reply.

The development of the big society is part of the Government's agenda to decentralise power to local areas. The Localism Bill, currently receiving parliamentary scrutiny, sets out many of the provisions which will underpin this process. Decisions on local issues affecting social cohesion will be increasingly put into the hands of local communities, and the measures we are taking to encourage local transparency of local government services, data, and expenditure will further enable these communities to take an informed role in these decisions, and assess progress locally.

Chris Ruane: To ask the Minister for the Cabinet Office if he will assess the effects of trends in social trust in the British Social Attitudes Survey in the last
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20 years in the context of the development of the big society initiative. [39014]

Mr Hurd: The Cabinet Office has not made a recent assessment of the trends in social trust in the British Social Attitudes Survey over the last 20 years. However, the Department is constantly reviewing sources of evidence relating to the development of the big society, and will continue to incorporate data from a number of sources, including the British Social Attitude Survey, to inform this analysis.

Voluntary Work: Young People

Chris Ruane: To ask the Minister for the Cabinet Office what assessment he has made of levels of volunteering among (a) children and (b) young adults; and whether he plans to promote volunteering to each such group. [38500]

Mr Hurd: Levels of volunteering in young people is measured by the Citizenship Survey. In December 2010 the Government published the "Giving Green Paper", which sought to start a debate about how we can make social action and volunteering a social norm for all ages. The Green Paper announced over £80 million available over the next four years to promote volunteering.

The Government are also investing in National Citizen Service, which will promote volunteering and community action. This flagship project is aimed at young people aged 16 and will combine outdoor activities and social action projects designed by the participants, both in their communities and away from home. Over 11,000 young people will have the opportunity to take part in a pilot NCS scheme over the summer.

For young people specifically, the Cabinet Office will also continue to provide financial support to the youth volunteering charity, v during the 2010 spending review period.

Young People

Chris Ruane: To ask the Minister for the Cabinet Office what information the Office for National Statistics collects on the average number of hours per day people aged between (a) five and 15 years, (b) 16 and 19 years and (c) 20 and 25 years spend alone. [38384]

Mr Hurd: The information requested falls within the responsibility of the UK Statistics Authority. I have asked the authority to reply.

Letter from Stephen Penneck, dated February 2011:


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Young People: Television

Chris Ruane: To ask the Minister for the Cabinet Office what estimate the Office for National Statistics makes of the average number of hours per day spent by (a) boys and (b) girls on watching television. [38385]

Mr Hurd: The information requested falls within the responsibility of the UK Statistics Authority. I have asked the authority to reply.


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Letter from Stephen Penneck, dated February 2011:


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