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Export Credits Guarantee Department

Zac Goldsmith: To ask the Secretary of State for Business, Innovation and Skills what consideration he gave to seeking the inclusion of measures to reform the Export Credits Guarantee Department in the Government’s carbon plan. [47145]

Mr Prisk: This Department’s contribution to the Government carbon plan mainly focused on the creation of the Green Investment Bank and the importance of

27 Apr 2011 : Column 489W

innovation in developing a low carbon economy and did not include ECGD reforms.

Further Education: Finance

Julie Elliott: To ask the Secretary of State for Business, Innovation and Skills from which sources he expects further education colleges to obtain funding following the reduction in entitlement funding. [52530]

Mr Hayes: We are rebalancing investment from public spending towards greater contributions from individuals and employers who benefit most and can afford to pay. Further education colleges and training organisations will seek income from these sources. Grant funding for advanced and higher level qualifications for new learners aged 24 and over will be removed and from the 2013/14 academic year, fee loans, repayable on an income contingent basis, will provide upfront support to enable people to continue to undertake training at these levels.

While the overall budget available for skills will reduce to £3.3 billion over this spending review period, the settlement protected investment in teaching and learning by focusing the reductions on areas which do not directly support participation.

In the 2011-12 year we plan to invest £3.7 billion through the Skills Funding Agency in FE and skills for post-19 learners. This supports the capacity for over 3 million adult training places in the 2011/12 academic year.

Over the spending review period we will:

Increase investment in adult (19+) apprenticeships;

Protect the £210 million per year investment in adult and community learning;

Fully fund basic literacy and numeracy provision and first full level 2 and first full level 3 qualifications for young adults; and

As part of the wider Government agenda to support people into employment, we will also fully fund accredited training for unemployed people in receipt of active benefits, helping them to obtain sustainable work in which they can progress.

Further Education: Learning Disability

Mr Tom Clarke: To ask the Secretary of State for Business, Innovation and Skills what steps he is taking to ensure that further education institutions provide places for people with profound and multiple learning disabilities; and if he will make a statement. [51276]

Mr Hayes: Skills training for people with learning disabilities is a priority for the Government. The Young People's Learning Agency is responsible for funding all learners aged 19-24 who are in receipt of high level and exceptional level additional learning support (ALS) amounts over £5,500 either with or without a Section 140 or 139a learning difficulty assessment. The Skills Funding Agency is responsible for funding all learners aged 19+ who are in receipt of low level ALS amounts up to and including £5,500 either with or without a Section 140 or 139a learning difficulty assessment.

We expect further education colleges and other training providers to recognise the needs of this group of learners within their local communities when planning delivery and to develop innovative ways of responding to their needs, working with a wide range of partners in order to meet them.

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Higher Education: Finance

Stephen Lloyd: To ask the Secretary of State for Business, Innovation and Skills what plans he has to review the provision of non-prescribed higher education funded via the Skills Funding Agency; and if he will make a statement. [51880]

Mr Hayes: As part of the forthcoming higher education White Paper and subsequent consultation, we will consider the distinctions between ‘prescribed’ and ‘non- prescribed’ higher education in order to ensure that the student funding scheme offers a clear path for students to progress from further to higher education.

Horticulture

Nic Dakin: To ask the Secretary of State for Business, Innovation and Skills whether he plans to offer support to small and medium-sized enterprises to promote skills in the horticultural sector. [51763]

Mr Hayes: Lantra is the sector skills council for the land-based and environmental industries. They are committed to helping the sector to access the training, qualifications, skills and knowledge they need. Lantra actively promotes the sector as a positive career choice to young people and adults, making sure that they are equipped with the right skills for careers in the sector while encouraging people to value and take up skills and development opportunities.

Intellectual Property and Growth Review

Ian Lucas: To ask the Secretary of State for Business, Innovation and Skills to which Minister in his Department the Hargreaves review on intellectual property and copyright will report. [52392]

Mr Davey: The Hargreaves independent review of intellectual property and growth will report to my right hon. Friend the Secretary of State for Business, Innovation and Skills and my right hon. Friend the Chancellor of the Exchequer.

Post Offices

Kate Hoey: To ask the Secretary of State for Business, Innovation and Skills, pursuant to the answer of 15 February 2011, Official Report, column 742W, on the Post Office: modernisation, when he anticipates Post Office Ltd’s implementation plans for modernisation of the network will be complete. [51109]

Mr Davey: Post Office Ltd. will be developing implementation plans throughout this financial year, informed by the piloting of new network models, to allow 4,000 Main Post Offices and 2,000 Post Office Locals to be introduced by the end of March 2015.

Research: Finance

Chi Onwurah: To ask the Secretary of State for Business, Innovation and Skills what funding his Department has provided for translational research partnerships since their inception. [52481]

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Mr Willetts: This Department allocated £595,000 of the strategic investment fund, for distribution by the Technology Strategy Board (TSB), to establish the co-ordination function for the therapeutic capability clusters (TCC's) programme. The budget ran from July 2010 to March 2011, over which period a total of £225,000 was provided (subject to a final financial audit).

The National Institute for Health Research (NIHR) Office for Clinical Research Infrastructure (NOCRI) will co-ordinate the establishment of translational research partnerships, building on the existing TCC's. The NIHR biomedical research centres and units, to be designated in summer 2011 and in which the NIHR will invest £775 million, will form the basis of these partnerships.

Research: Trade Competitiveness

Chi Onwurah: To ask the Secretary of State for Business, Innovation and Skills what recent assessment his Department has made of the competitiveness of the UK as a destination for international private sector research and development investment. [52491]

Mr Willetts: This Department does not collect data on the competitiveness of the UK as a destination for private sector research and development investment.

A proxy for this is provided by the Organization for Economic Cooperation and Development (OECD) in its Main Science and Technology Indicators Database, which shows that in 2008 23.5% of business expenditure on research and development (BERD) was financed from abroad, the highest percentage amongst OECD countries which provide comparable data. Whilst this is a useful indicator as to the success of the UK's business sector in attracting overseas financing, these data are limited as they do not capture inflows of foreign private sector research and development funds which go to non-business institutions such as universities.

Retirement: Age

Mr Denham: To ask the Secretary of State for Business, Innovation and Skills what assessment he has made of the effect on the number of age discrimination cases dealt with by employment tribunals of the abolition of the default retirement age. [52319]

Mr Davey: The Government's central estimate is that there will be an increase of around 260 employment tribunal (ET) cases due to the abolition of the default retirement age. This is a net change based on an estimated saving of 340 ET cases that can no longer be brought against employers on procedural grounds and an estimated extra 600 age discrimination claims as a direct result of the abolition of the default retirement age.

Further information can be found in the final impact assessment at:

http://www.bis.gov.uk/assets/biscore/employment-matters/docs/p/11-634-phasing-out-default-retirement-age-impact-assessment.pdf

Science: Finance

Chi Onwurah: To ask the Secretary of State for Business, Innovation and Skills what his policy is on the Lisbon goal of achieving science funding of 3% of gross domestic product. [52490]

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Mr Willetts: The target of 3% of EU GDP to be spent on research and development (R&D) in the Lisbon strategy, which ran from 2000 to 2010, is also a target under the Europe 2020 strategy published in March 2010. At the European Council meeting in June 2010 the UK and other EU member states confirmed the five Europe 2020 strategy targets, which included the 3% R&D target. It was also agreed that member states would implement the policy priorities at national level according to national decision making procedures.

Consistent with our public sector transparency framework, the Government do not intend to adopt national targets for the proportion of GDP spent on R&D, nor for any of the other Europe 2020 targets. However, the Government acknowledge that R&D and innovation are key drivers of economic growth, as demonstrated in the “Plan for Growth”, which we published alongside the 2011 Budget.

Service Agreements

Mr Denham: To ask the Secretary of State for Business, Innovation and Skills what shared service agreements his Department has with other Government Departments. [51581]

Mr Davey: The Department for Business, Innovation and Skills (BIS) currently has shared service agreements for several corporate services with the Department of Energy and Climate Change. Some research and analysis, estates and ICT services are shared with the Department for Education. BIS shares a number of specific ICT systems and applications with other Government Departments and shares a building with the Department for Work and Pensions.

Stem Cells: Research

Chi Onwurah: To ask the Secretary of State for Business, Innovation and Skills what funding his Department has provided to the cell therapy industry in each of the last five years. [52482]

Mr Willetts: The Department for Business, Innovation and Skills indirectly funds the development of cell therapies by industry through its sponsorship of the Technology Strategy Board. This is a wide-ranging cross disciplinary field spanning areas such as stem cells, tissue engineering, biomaterials, cell-based gene therapy, immunomodulation cell therapies, cell cancer vaccines and other related fields.

While some of the research under each of these themes can be classified as support for the cell therapy industry, it would not be accurate to, for example, apportion all stem cell research as falling under this heading. As information on “cell therapy” support is not held centrally it could be provided only at disproportionate cost.

Data on Technology Strategy Board support for the specific area of stem cells are as follows:

2005-06: £893,000

2006-07: £2.5 million

2007-08: £2.9 million

2008-09: £1.5 million

2009-10: £2.2 million.

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The Technology Strategy Board also coordinates public sector funding for the public-private partnership, Stem Cells for Safer Medicine.

The Technology Strategy Board recently announced that a technology and innovation centre will be established in the area of cell therapy. This will build on over £200 million in public investment in basic and translational stem cell science since 2003, and the launch of the Technology Strategy Board/Research Council £21.5 million regenerative medicine programme in 2009, to support the development and commercialisation of relevant technologies.

Students: Finance

Mr Lammy: To ask the Secretary of State for Business, Innovation and Skills how many key facts leaflets for full-time students communicating the changes to student finance in 2012-13 will be produced; if he will estimate the cost to the public purse of producing such leaflets; and what plans he has for their distribution. [51734]

Mr Willetts: The key facts leaflet for full-time students has been produced as an e-flyer, intended to be downloaded from suitable websites. It has been distributed at no cost, via email, to a range of organisations and websites.

A total of 245 copies have been printed internally for use in correspondence, including mailing to vice chancellors and the parliamentary Library. The cost of this printing cannot be separately identified as it is part of the total departmental printing budget.

The cost to the public purse for typesetting the document was £1,236.00 (excluding VAT of £247.20).

Mr Lammy: To ask the Secretary of State for Business, Innovation and Skills what progress he has made on producing a key facts flyer for part-time students communicating the changes to student finance. [51735]

Mr Willetts: We expect to make available an e-flyer on key facts for part-time students soon after the May elections, when there is greater clarity about the legislative changes needed to limit the fees which can be charged for part-time courses.

Mr Lammy: To ask the Secretary of State for Business, Innovation and Skills what radio stations his Department plans to use to communicate changes to student finance arrangements to prospective students. [51736]

Mr Willetts: Radio advertising will be part of our student finance communications campaign. The selection of radio stations across England, which is yet to be finalised, will be made using expert advice and industry radio listening research from the Central Office of Information (COI) and its relevant agencies to ensure the best reach for our target audiences.

Mr Lammy: To ask the Secretary of State for Business, Innovation and Skills what budget he has allocated to communicating changes to student finance arrangements for 2012-13. [51738]

Mr Willetts: The Department considers it essential to ensure that prospective students and their families know about the full package of support available to support

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access to higher education. This Department is working with the Central Office of Information to develop an effective and proportionate information campaign.

We have appointed an advertising agency to support this campaign and expect its costs to be in the region of £150,000, including their charges for production of press and online advertisements. The budget for chosen media is yet to be determined.

Mr Lammy: To ask the Secretary of State for Business, Innovation and Skills how many unique visits the www.direct.gov.uk/studentfinance website received between 18 February 2010 and 16 March 2010. [51739]

Mr Willetts: There were 952,555 visits to the student finance home page http://www.direct.gov.uk/studentfinance between 18 February 2010 and 16 March 2010.

Mr Lammy: To ask the Secretary of State for Business, Innovation and Skills how many unique visits the www.bis.gov.uk/studentfinance website received between 1 February 2011 and 17 March 2011. [51740]

Mr Willetts: Between 1 February 2011 and 17 March 2011, the http://bis.gov.uk/studentfinance pages received 53,558 visits.

Third Sector

Chris Ruane: To ask the Secretary of State for Business, Innovation and Skills how much his Department provided to each charity it funds in each of the last five years; and how much he has allocated for funding to each such charity in each of the next five years. [48286]

Mr Davey: Officials are currently looking at the best way for Departments to regularly report publicly on spending, in terms of both baseline levels and how these levels change through the spending period.

It is therefore not currently possible to provide this information without the Department incurring disproportionate costs.

Details of all new central Government contracts are now available online at:

http://www.contractsfinder.businesslink.gov.uk

Education

Children: Poverty

Chris Ruane: To ask the Secretary of State for Education, pursuant to the answer of 23 March 2011, Official Report, columns 1175-7W, on children: well-being, what recent progress has been made on the production of a child poverty strategy; and what steps he plans to take to eradicate child poverty by 2020. [52019]

Tim Loughton: The Government published their child poverty strategy, “A New Approach to Child Poverty: Tackling the Causes of Disadvantage and Transforming Families' Lives” on April 5.(1) The strategy provides a framework for ending child poverty by 2020 and delivers a comprehensive three-year plan to lay the foundations for a new and more effective approach.

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The strategy contains detailed timelines showing when the measures included in the strategy will take effect.

(1) http://www.education.gov.uk/publications/eOrderingDownload /CM-8061.pdf

Curriculum: Humanities

Michael Fallon: To ask the Secretary of State for Education what definition his Department uses of a humanities subject. [51650]

Mr Gibb [holding answer 26 April 2011]: Section 85 of the Education Act 2002 (amended by SI 2003 (No2946)) establishes humanities as one of the four national curriculum entitlement areas for 14 to 16-year-olds (key stage 4). It defines humanities as comprising history and geography.

Departmental Accounting

Jon Trickett: To ask the Secretary of State for Education whether any ministerial directions have been issued to the accounting officer of his Department since his appointment. [51999]

Tim Loughton: No ministerial directions have been issued to the Department's accounting officer since the Secretary of State's appointment in May 2010.

Education: Assessments

Damian Hinds: To ask the Secretary of State for Education what the average number of (a) A, (b) AS and (c) A2 level subject entries per student was in (i) year 12 and (ii) year 13 in maintained schools and sixth form colleges in academic year (A) 1996-97 and (B) 2009-10. [27596]

Mr Gibb: In 1997, the average number of A Levels sat per pupil aged 17 at the start of the academic year in maintained schools and sixth form colleges was 3.32. In 2010, the average number of A Levels sat per pupil at the end of key stage 5 in maintained schools and sixth form colleges was 1.95.

The cohort of pupils at the end of key stage 5 is composed of 16 to 18 year olds who were entered for level 3 qualifications at least equivalent in size to one GCE/Applied GCE A Level and this includes both early and late takers.

AS results are not collected in year 12 and only the results that have been reported to the exam board (or “cashed in”) are cumulatively counted in year 13. Advanced subsidiary (AS) courses were introduced as part of the 2000 curriculum. Prior to that, pupils could take an advanced supplementary (AS). The difference in AS qualification types prevents comparison between 1997 and 2010 results.

Data for A2 level subject entries are not readily available and can be provided only at disproportionate cost.

Source:

The School Performance Tables.

Free School Meals

Ian Mearns: To ask the Secretary of State for Education how many children received free school meals in each ward in the Gateshead borough council area in the last year for which figures are available. [51603]

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Mr Gibb: Information about the number of school pupils resident in each ward in Gateshead who are eligible for free school meals is provided in the following table.

Number and percentage of resident pupils (1,) () (2) eligible for free school meals (3) in each ward (4) in Gateshead in January 2010

Number of resident pupils (1) (, ) (2) eligible for free school meals (3) Percentage of resident pupils (1, 2) eligible for free school meals (3)

Gateshead

5,180

21.7

Bede

310

39.6

Bensham

220

38.0

Birtley

180

17.2

Blaydon

310

26.2

Chopwell and Rowlands Gill

250

20.9

Chowdene

150

13.1

Crawcrook and Greenside

120

10.4

Deckham

390

36.6

Dunston

230

18.6

Felling

390

40.0

High Fell

380

31.8

Lamesley

270

24.9

Leam

460

31.5

Low Fell

50

5.0

Pelaw and Heworth

230

22.6

Ryton

130

11.8

Saltwell

250

32.2

Teams

280

23.7

Whickham North

170

13.4

Whickham South

70

5.7

Winlaton

120

13.4

Wrekendyke

250

17.6

(1) Includes full-time and part-time pupils, including boarders, who are sole or dual registrations, attending maintained nursery, primary, middle deemed primary, secondary and middle deemed secondary schools, City Technology Colleges, Academies and all Special Schools. (2) Figures rounded to the nearest 10, totals may not sum due to rounding. (3) Pupils eligible for free school meals who have full-time attendance and are aged 15 or under, or pupils who have part-time attendance and are aged between five and 15. (4) Census Area Statistic (CAS) Wards. Source: School Census (Final)

Free Schools

Ian Mearns: To ask the Secretary of State for Education what estimate his Department has made of the average amount of funding his Department will contribute to the establishment of a free school in 2010-11; and whether he has made provision for additional funding to be allocated to free schools in the event that his Department's annual budget for contributing to establishing such schools is exhausted before the end of a year. [51712]

Mr Gibb: I refer the hon. Member to the reply given on 30 March 2011, Official Report, column 419W.

Grammar Schools: Human Rights

Bill Esterson: To ask the Secretary of State for Education what information his Department has made available to selective grammar schools on their obligations under

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the Human Rights Act 1998 and the UN Convention on the Rights of the Child. [52173]

Tim Loughton: The Department has not sent any information about the Human Rights Act 1998 (HRA) or the UN Convention on the Rights of the Child (UNCRC) specifically to selective grammar schools.

Marriage Guidance

Andrew Selous: To ask the Secretary of State for Education, pursuant to the House of Lords debate of 10 February 2011, Official Report, House of Lords, column 390, on marriage, what steps he is taking to reduce the stigma against seeking relationship advice; when he intends to review relationships education in schools; and what plans he has for training Sure Start health visitors in (a) relationship support and (b) pointing couples to relationship support. [52014]

Tim Loughton: The Department for Education is grant funding 12 voluntary and community sector (VCS) organisations to deliver relationship support services. Some of these services will include measures to reduce the stigma against seeking relationship advice, for example Relate plans to carry out a national awareness raising campaign on the benefits of relationship support, using agony aunts and social media.

The schools White Paper, “The Importance of Teaching”, announced our intention to conduct an internal review of personal, social, health and economic (PSHE) education. This includes sex and relationships education (SRE). We will announce details of the review shortly.

Five of the organisations funded by the VCS grant scheme are planning to deliver training to staff in Sure Start children's centres on relationship support and pointing couples to relationship support. This could include Sure Start health visitors.

Marriage Guidance: Grants

Andrew Selous: To ask the Secretary of State for Education (1) which voluntary and community sector awards have been provided under the fund for relationships support; [51675]

(2) which awards and how much of the funding under the voluntary and community sector grants scheme will be provided for (a) preventative couple relationships support, (b) relationship counselling for couples in difficulty and (c) work with families which have already experienced break-up; [51677]

(3) whether he plans to monitor the amount of couple relationship support funding provided by his Department which is spent on supporting (a) married couples, (b) cohabiting couples, (c) civil partners and (d) parents; [51744]

(4) what provision for black and minority ethnic couples he plans to make from the relationships support grant; [51674]

(5) what mechanism he plans to put in place to assess the effectiveness of couple relationship support funded by grants from his Department. [51743]

Tim Loughton [holding answer 26 April 2011] : £7.5 million has been made available from the Department for Education’s voluntary and community sector (VCS)

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grants scheme to support couple relationships in 2011-12. The following organisations have been awarded funding (subject to grant negotiations):

Asian Family Counselling Service

Care for the Family

Centre for Separated Families

Contact a Family

Families Need Fathers

Gingerbread

Marriage Care

National Association of Child Contact Centres

One Plus One

PACE (Project for Advocacy, Counselling and Education)

Relate

Tavistock Centre for Couple Relationships

The majority of the organisations deliver a mix of preventative couple relationship support, relationship counselling for couples in difficulty and work with families which have already experienced break-up.

The Department invited proposals from the voluntary sector to encourage couples to take up preventative support to develop and sustain their relationship and, where relationship breakdown does occur, to put in place effective parenting arrangements so that any negative impacts on children are minimised. The areas of work for which proposals were invited included: cultural change to encourage families to seek help earlier; training of key practitioners, particularly in Sure Start children's centres, to recognise and respond appropriately to relationship distress in order to minimise any negative impacts on children; evaluation of effective practice to build the evidence base of effective interventions; and innovative approaches to relationship support—including provision of relationship support which meets the needs of those lower-income families who might struggle to pay and who are at most risk from breakdown.

Service delivery will be monitored through key performance indicators. In addition, the Department plans to commission evaluation which will consider the effectiveness of relationship support interventions.

All of the services funded by the relationships support grant are expected to make their provision accessible to black and minority ethnic couples. In addition, the Asian Family Counselling Service (AFCS) has been funded to provide counselling and support to members of the Asian community whose relationships are under stress and who find it hard to access mainstream services.

Schools: Nurses

Rosie Cooper: To ask the Secretary of State for Education what discussions he has had with the Secretary of State for Health on increasing (a) investment in and (b) empowerment of school nurses. [51670]

Tim Loughton [holding answer 26 April 2011]: The Secretary of State for Education and his ministerial team have ongoing discussions with colleagues at the Department of Health about areas of common interest. School nurses are employed by the national health service and currently provide a number of services. These include carrying out developmental screening, undertaking health interviews, administering immunisation programmes, and providing health and sex education within schools.

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Schools have long valued the contribution school nurses make to the health, well-being, and achievement of the children and young people in their care. The school nursing service can have a pivotal role in both providing and arranging specific training for schools in the management of long-term conditions, for example asthma and diabetes.

It is currently for primary care trusts (PCTs) and their partners to determine, on the basis of a local health needs assessment, how many school nurses there should be and how they should be deployed. The Government want to increase local flexibility and therefore have no plans to change these arrangements.

Sure Start Programme: Closures

John Mann: To ask the Secretary of State for Education what estimate he has made of the number of Sure Start children's centres at risk of closure in 2011. [51828]

Tim Loughton: Sure Start children's centres are at the heart of the Government's vision for supporting families with young children and intervening early to prevent problems from becoming crises. The Government have ensured there is enough money in the system to maintain a network of Sure Start children's centres.

The Department for Education collects data on the number of Sure Start children's centres in each local authority area in England, but does not collect data on local authority plans for changes to children's centres. It is for local authorities, in consultation with local communities, to determine the most effective way of delivering future services to meet local need. Local authorities continue to have duties under the Childcare Act 2006 to ensure sufficient provision of children's centres, so far as is reasonably practicable, and to consult before opening, closing or significantly changing children's centres.

Teenage Pregnancy

Chris Ruane: To ask the Secretary of State for Education, pursuant to the answer of 17 March 2011, Official Report, columns 614-5W, on teenage pregnancy: personal income, which wards his Department has classified as teenage pregnancy hotspots. [52501]

Tim Loughton: In her response to the hon. Member’s previous question, the Minister for Children and Families said that wards with high rates of teenage pregnancies were found in virtually every local authority in England. We do not classify wards by their rate, but would regard a high rate ward as being one of the 20% of wards with the highest rates. In 2006-08 this means wards with a rate of at least 53.1 conceptions per 1,000 women aged 15-17.

The Office for National Statistics (ONS) produces statistics on conceptions, which are estimates based on the number of live births, stillbirths and legal abortions, but not including miscarriages and illegal abortions. Ward under-18 conceptions data are not publicly available, to protect the privacy of individuals. However, under a service level agreement (SLA) between ONS and my Department, local authorities in England can request ward level under-18 conception figures, aggregated over three years, from ONS to enable them to target their early intervention services to prevent teenage pregnancies

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in the areas with the highest rates. This information enables local areas to plan their approaches to reducing teenage pregnancies, which they are best placed to determine.

The list names all those wards in England where in 2006-08:

the ward was one of the 20% of wards with the highest rates (a rate of at least 53.1 conceptions per 1,000 women aged 15-17);

and in addition

the rate was statistically significantly higher than the England average (41.0 conceptions per 1,000 women aged 15-17). This is to exclude wards where the rate is based on a very small number of conceptions where the rate may change considerably from year to year.

Wards defined as being “high rate” are found in nearly all top-tier local authorities (138 out of 152).

I will place a copy in the House Libraries.

As some wards have very small populations of women in the 15-17 age group, their under-18 conception rates can fluctuate by chance from year to year and may not indicate a consistently high incidence of teenage pregnancy. For this reason, ward rates are aggregated over three years. Ward population estimates, which are used in the calculation of ward-level conception statistics, are also experimental statistics and as such have not yet been assessed against the rigorous quality standards normally applying to National Statistics. The estimates are made available to users as the best population estimates for these small geographical areas and to allow user feedback on the quality of the statistics.

Further information about conception statistics produced by ONS can be found on its website at:

http://www.statistics.gov.uk/statbase/product.asp?vlnk=15055

Voluntary Organisations: Grants

Andrew Selous: To ask the Secretary of State for Education which organisations received funding though the voluntary and community sector grants scheme; how much funding each organisation requested in its expression of interest; how much funding each organisation requested in its bid document; and how much funding each organisation was awarded. [51678]

Tim Loughton [holding answer 26 April 2011]:The voluntary and community sector plays, and will continue to play, a significant role in delivering and improving services for children, young people and families. Through the grants programme announced on 25 February, DFE will invest around £120 million over the next two years to help support the delivery of key national priorities for children, young people and families. This grant is just one of a range of funding streams from DFE to the voluntary sector and represents a significant investment in a tough financial climate.

Following an open competition, 118 bidders were successful with their applications and grants have been awarded from 1 April 2011.

As expected, the bidding process was highly competitive and the total amounts of funding bid for by organisations significantly exceeded the level of funding available. We therefore had to make tough decisions in order to live within the available funding and this inevitably led to a need to scale back some of the successful bids to ensure the best use of public funding. In a very small number of cases, we awarded more funding to organisations

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than they requested in their bid document in order to secure additional high quality provision to meet national priorities. We also undertook an equality impact assessment to ensure that our funding decisions did not impact disproportionately on children, young people and families in respect of gender, ethnicity and special educational needs and disabilities.

27 Apr 2011 : Column 502W

Information on how much funding was bid for by these organisations at each stage of competition and the amount of indicative awards is provided in the following table. Please note that final negotiations are still taking place and indicative amounts may vary slightly from the final amount awarded.

VCS grant awards 2011-12 and 2012-13
£
  Funding requested via EOI (stage 1) Funding requested via bid (stage 2) Amount awarded
Organisation name/consortium lead 2011-12 2012-13 2011-12 2012-13 2011-12 2012-13

4Children

390,000

350,000

390,000

350,000

350,000

350,000

4Children

390,000

300,000

390,000

300,000

390,000

300,000

4Children (Foundations for the Future)

850,000

800,000

500,000

500,000

500,000

500,000

A National Voice

257,500

265,225

100,000

100,000

100,000

100,000

ACE Centre North

129,500

129,000

135,251

115,133

135,251

115,133

Action for Advocacy

147,747

149,918

73,900

71,315

50,000

50,000

Action for Children

960,000

1,115,000

735,000

670,000

735,000

670,000

Action for Prisoners’ Families (APF)

185,200

£165,800

178,937

197,645

100,000

100,000

Addaction

274,846

258,500

274,000

214,852

274,000

214,000

Addaction

428,424

431,963

413,264

282,592

409,573

281,674

Adfam

52,145

52,145

92,500

92,500

92,500

92,500

Alcohol Concern

217,000

217,000

117,000

264,000

206,000

191,000

Anna Freud Centre

236,269

242,062

381,417

434,410

381,417

434,410

Asian Family Counselling Service

125,000

120,000

150,000

149,800

150,000

149,800

Autism Education Trust (AET)

719,000

587,000

652,469

565,019

652,469

555,441

Barnardo's

550,000

500,000

1,119,663

1,142,221

1,119,663

1,142,221

Barnardo's

740,000

360,000

291,995

291,995

290,000

290,000

Barnardo's

531,880

774,760

518,316

879,360

518,316

879,360

Bolton Lads and Girls Club

219,120

225,418

355,041

294,278

355,041

294,278

British Association for Adoption and Fostering

295,000

295,000

299,804

299,804

299,000

299,000

Brook

130,488

80,852

139,631

100,181

139,631

100,181

Capital SHS (School-Home Support)

1,000,000

1,000,000

739,729

745,721

500,000

500,000

Care for the Family (CFF)

2,000,000

1,500,000

1,000,000

600,000

300,000

200,000

Careers South West Ltd (Positive Transitions)

13,500,000

10,800,000

3,572,769

2,851,804

1,170,283

1,229,717

Catch22

2,500,000

1,750,000

1,794,626

1,454,121

1,604,972

1,569,121

Catch22

550,000

425,000

355,672

335,730

350,000

330,000

Centre for Separated Families

240,000

180,000

240,000

180,000

240,000

180,000

Challenging Behaviour Foundation (CBF)

130,300

148,500

192,655

222,136

192,655

222,136

Child & Family Training Limited (C&FT)

148,523

49,760

145,483

153,437

145,483

153,437

Children and Families Across Borders (CFAB)

113,000

116,320

113,000

116,320

113,000

116,320

Children England (Kindle Plus Consortium)

985,000

886,500

1,250,964

1,209,075

1,250,964

1,209,075

Children Our Ultimate Investment

244,000

244,000

254,000

234,000

254,000

234,001

Children’s Legal Centre

175,265

154,291

176,265

154,291

176,265

154,291

Children's Society

200,000

300,000

212,808

232,839

243,726

267,535

Clubs for Young People

625,000

450,000

1,000,000

750,000

650,000

480,000

Communication Trust (I CAN)

1,070,000

800,000

1,249,609

852,865

1,000,000

750,000

Contact a Family

310,000

285,000

216,525

203,298

216,525

203,298

Contact a Family

429,160

446,539

438,649

419,780

438,649

419,780

ContinYou

450,000

340,000

478,000

386,000

400,000

386,000

Council for Disabled Children (CDC)

400,000

325,000

749,642

695,650

749,642

695,650

CSV

98,179

98,869

158,672

132,507

158,672

132,507

CSV

287,000

296,000

402,423

385,423

402,423

375,423

Daycare Trust

389,076

278,863

477,566

341,197

300,000

300,000

Diana Award

198,922

132,614

198,922

132,614

198,922

132,614

Dyslexia Action

750,000

1,000,000

1,000,000

750,000

750,000

600,000

27 Apr 2011 : Column 503W

27 Apr 2011 : Column 504W

Dyslexia-SpLD Trust

750,000

740,000

693,456

630,579

693,456

630,579

Early Education (The British Assc. for Early Childhood Education)

130,000

102,000

131,374

108,040

131,374

108,040

Endeavour

230,000

230,000

312,868

230,691

312,868

310,679

Families Need Fathers

200,000

206,000

303,875

307,541

261,415

263,807

Family and Parenting Institute

233,160

134,588

329,088

181,616

329,088

181,616

Family Delivery Team (Interface Assc. UK)

1,200,000

800,000

403,218

324,114

960,097

933,375

Family Rights Group

97,920

95,430

97,400

99,200

93,000

93,000

Fatherhood Institute

230,000

82,800

302,310

164,665

302,310

164,665

Fatherhood Institute

277,600

144,200

310,890

166,476

310,890

166,476

Fostering Network

175,000

175,000

78,988

79,988

78,000

79,000

Foyer Federation

450,000

250,000

544,362

353,519

500,000

353,519

Gingerbread

95,000

50,000

282,638

263,016

193,102

174,081

Groundwork UK

1,900,000

1,000,000

1,715,500

1,215,600

1,500,000

1,215,600

Home-Start UK (HSUK)

2,900,000

2,682,500

1,520,754

1,372,938

1,230,000

1,200,000

Home-Start UK (HSUK)

95,335

72,335

792,020

717,663

792,020

717,663

Independent Parental Special Education Advice (IPSEA)

55,000

50,000

70,800

70,800

70,800

70,800

Institute of Wellbeing

450,000

400,000

450,000

400,000

450,000

400,000

KIDS

437,800

307,100

437,800

307,100

385,800

270,100

Kids Company

3,000,000

3,000,000

4,485,000

4,485,000

4,485,000

4,485,000

Kidscape

127,500

125,000

133,456

127,966

131,232

137,309

Lucy Faithfull Foundation

198,000

207,000

210,519

222,911

210,519

222,911

MacIntyre

290,000

£290,000

399,168

326,004

399,168

326,004

Marriage Care

650,000

580,000

690,269

616,475

690,269

616,475

Media Trust

500,000

375,000

500,000

375,000

399,989

375,000

Missing People

150,000

130,000

215,828

222,303

215,828

222,303

Movement for non-mobile children (Whizz Kidz)

181,103

186,536

257,437

199,340

257,437

199,340

National Association for Special Education Needs (The)—Nasen

500,000

400,000

700,000

620,000

600,000

520,000

National Assc. of Child Contact Centres (NACCC)

150,000

135,000

317,475

306,325

160,000

160,000

National Autistic Society

45,773

48,774

107,681

74,941

107,681

74,941

National Childminding Association

700,000

900,000

641,115

645,092

500,000

600,000

National Children's Bureau (NCB)

148,000

116,000

99,413

79,358

99,000

79,000

National Children's Bureau (NCB)

647,000

575,000

601,949

577,723

540,000

510,000

National Children's University

525,000

350,000

525,000

350,000

350,000

350,000

National Council for Voluntary Youth Services (NCVYS) (known as Catalyst)

1,411,000

911,000

1,490,300

1,089,000

1,490,300

1,089,000

National Day Nurseries Association (NDNA)

880,000

908,160

743,806

745,691

500,000

500,000

National Deaf Children's Society

209,340

209,340

196,292

155,496

196,292

155,496

National Education Trust

90,000

80,000

137,300

119,800

137,300

119,800

National Portage Association (NPA)

175,000

175,000

175,000

175,000

175,000

175,000

National Sensory Impaired Partnership (NatSIP)

200,000

150,000

200,000

150,000

200,000

150,000

NSPCC (Safe Network)

700,000

650,000

630,000

650,000

630,000

650,000

One Plus One (OPO)

950,000

750,000

950,000

750,000

921,250

724,500

Parenting UK

112,500

101,250

120,550

108,050

120,550

108,050

Parentline Plus (Family Lives)

536,000

354,000

698,688

603,392

698,688

603,392

Partners of Prisoners and Families Support Group (POPS)

400,000

400,000

383,106

383,106

150,000

150,000

Pen Green Children and Families and Research Centre

160,000

140,000

200,397

168,752

200,397

168,752

Place2Be

121,172

127,230

317,353

347,932

221,815

240,939

Place2Be

98,728

103,665

160,338

162,031

160,338

162,031

27 Apr 2011 : Column 505W

27 Apr 2011 : Column 506W

Pre-school Learning Alliance

1,500,000

1,300,000

1,211,615

986,070

865,000

930,000

Prince's Trust (and Fairbridge)

433,054

668,895

971,787

858,891

898,289

858,891

Princess Royal Trust for Carers

710,965

690,720

796,878

600,498

500,000

500,000

Prison Advice and Care Trust (PACT)

182, 983

181,083

314,525

343,546

314,525

343,546

Project for Advocacy Counselling and Education (PACE)

49,850

37,000

153,853

157,206

153,853

157,206

QED UK

106,296

111,242

113,521

106,767

113,521

106,767

Relate

2,150,000

1,950,000

2,146,403

1,947,630

1,850,403

1,711,630

Roma Support Group

71,600

61,948

86,387

65,431

86,387

65,431

Safe Ground

240,000

240,000

240,979

235,380

240,979

235,380

School Food Trust

2,255,000

2,255,000

536,708

620,881

160,000

200,000

SCOPE

121,000

135,000

121,693

135.256

121,693

135,256

Shared Care Network

99,000

75,000

118,072

91,324

112,000

81,000

Social Care Institute for Excellence (SCIE)

450,000

212,400

575,770

424,208

518,193

424,208

Spurgeons

429,125

421,050

473,999

465,266

350,000

350,000

Tavistock Centre for Couple Relationships

728,000

700,000

750,000

730,000

699,000

657,000

Terrence Higgins Trust

250,000

250,000

207,664

214,603

203,528

218,739

Time for Families

470,000

720,000

470,000

720,000

150,000

150,000

Tomorrow's People

1,200,000

343,000

1,116,028

557,262

750,000

750,000

UK Youth

429,125

421,050

1,308,043

781,082

454,490

512,510

V, National Young Volunteers Service

728,000

700,000

1,208,704

769,904

800,000

769,904

Victoria Climbié Foundation UK

250,000

250,000

168,880

167,280

168,880

167,280

Voice (Voice for the Child in Care)

470,000

720,000

98,000

98,000

75,000

75,000

Who Cares? Trust

1,200,000

343,000

74,517

72,411

74,000

72,000

WomenCentre Ltd

429,125

421,050

155,400

160,800

155,400

160,800

YMCA Derbyshire

1,807,024

1,499,888

847,024

851,331

600,000

599,809

YoungMinds

194,000

130,000

213,792

142,900

213,792

142,900

Note: Disclaimer: The funding amounts are indicative. Year 1 funding is dependent on successful negotiations on detail of the grants and securing exemption for activity which is subject to the marketing and advertising efficiency controls. Year 2 amounts are dependent on successful delivery of agreed outcomes.

Home Department

Departmental Procurement

Mr Ruffley: To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department from which companies her Department has purchased goods and services of a total value above £1 million in each of the last three years; and how much was spent in respect of each such company. [52310]

Damian Green: The companies from which the Home Department, inclusive of its executive agencies, purchased goods and services of a total value greater than £1 million and the value of spend with each company in each of the last three years are detailed in the table which will be placed in the House Libraries.

Employment Agencies

Mike Freer: To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department how much her Department spent on (a) recruitment agency fees, (b) outplacement agency fees for displaced or redundant staff and (c) staff training in the last year for which figures are available. [51404]

Damian Green: Information on how much the Home Department spent on (a) recruitment agency fees could be obtained only at disproportionate cost. On (b) the Department does not hold contracts with outplacement agencies for services for displaced or redundant staff. On (c) the cash based expenditure by the Department, inclusive of its executive agencies, on staff training to the end of February of the financial year 2010-11 was £8 million.

Homicide

Caroline Lucas: To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department how many homicides there were in (a) England, (b) Wales, (c) Scotland, (d) Northern Ireland and (e) Brighton and Hove in each of the last five years; how many of those killed were (i) female and (ii) male; what the gender of the perpetrator was in respect of victims of each gender; and whether there was evidence of (A) sexual assault and (B) rape in respect of victims of each gender. [52225]

James Brokenshire: Available data are collected by the Home Office from police forces in England and Wales, including the British Transport Police (BTP), where the offence was committed within England or Wales, and have been extracted from the Homicide Index. These are shown in the following tables:

27 Apr 2011 : Column 507W

27 Apr 2011 : Column 508W

Offences (1) currently recorded by the police as homicide by victim and principal suspect gender, and with ‘sexual’ main circumstances of offence: England and Wales, 2005-06 to 2009-10 (2)
Number
      Male victim
      Male suspect Female suspect Corporate suspect No current suspect  
Year (2) Country recorded Total victims Total Sexual (4) Total Total Total Total male victims

2005-06

England

645

366

3

19

50

435

 

Wales

22

9

2

2

13

 

BTP(3)

42

19

1

20

                 

2006-07

England

683

384

3

44

1

67

496

 

Wales

29

18

1

19

 

BTP(3)

3

3

3

                 

2007-08

England

702

409

2

42

64

515

 

Wales

39

22

2

24

 

BTP(3)

3

2

2

                 

2008-09

England

608

347

4

45

35

427

 

Wales

33

20

3

23

 

BTP(3)

3

1

1

                 

2009-10

England

574

315

2

25

59

399

 

Wales

43

11

4

6

21

 

BTP(3)

2

1

1

Number
    Female victim
    Male suspect Female suspect Corporate suspect No current suspect  
Year (2) Country recorded Total Sexual (4) Total Sexual (4) Total Total Sexual (4) Total female victims

2005-06

England

180

6

11

19

210

 

Wales

7

1

1

9

 

BTP(3)

21

1

22

                   

2006-07

England

153

14

14

1

20

187

 

Wales

8

1

1

10

 

BTP(3)

                   

2007-08

England

148

7

22

17

1

187

 

Wales

11

1

2

2

15

 

BTP(3)

1

1

                   

2008-09

England

147

1

17

17

181

 

Wales

10

10

 

BTP(3)

2

2

                   

2009-10

England

146

4

11

18

1

175

 

Wales

12

2

8

22

 

BTP(3)

1

1

(1) As at 28 September 2010; figures are subject to revision as cases are dealt with by the police and by the courts, or as further information becomes available. (2) Offences are shown according to the year in which they were initially recorded as homicide. This is not necessarily the year in which the incident took place or the year in which any court decision was made. (3) Offences recorded by British Transport Police. It is not possible to show where in England or Wales these offences were committed. (4) Offences where it has been judged that a sexual assault or sexual gratification of some sort was considered to be the primary motivation of the homicide.