Departmental Procurement

Jon Trickett: To ask the Secretary of State for Education pursuant to the answer of 5 April 2011, Official Report, columns 767-8W, on departmental procurement, which officials took part in the appointment of members of the expert panel; and who was responsible for the negotiating process to determine the monetary value of the contract for the expert panel. [53102]

Mr Gibb [holding answer 28 April 2011]: The process to appoint individuals to the National Curriculum Review Expert Panel was managed by officials working within the Department’s National Curriculum Review Division. Those officials also led the negotiating process to determine the monetary value of the contracts through which we have engaged the members of the Expert Panel.

Departmental Work Experience

Chi Onwurah: To ask the Secretary of State for Education what advice his Department provides to those wishing to (a) work as an intern, (b) undertake a work experience placement and (c) work as a volunteer in his Department. [52813]

Tim Loughton: For work experience opportunities, the Department advises year 10-11 schoolchildren to apply via the local Education Business Partnership located near to one of the Department's buildings. Undergraduate students can approach the Department direct to request a work placement opportunity. For internships, the Department advises university students to apply to the Cabinet Office who manage the process and allocate interns to Government Departments via a bidding process.

Teams and managers responsible for a work experience student or an intern are supported by Human Resources (who manage the process) and via guidance held electronically on the Department's intranet.

The Department actively encourages its staff to volunteer and provides a range of advice and ideas through a dedicated volunteering page on the Department's intranet. Volunteering is used as a way to support staff development

5 May 2011 : Column 918W

within the Department's performance management process. The Department is promoting a series of “Big Society” Roadshows during May-June that will encourage staff to ask questions and help them to learn more about the volunteering opportunities available to them.

John Mann: To ask the Secretary of State for Education how many students from (a) the UK and (b) Bassetlaw constituency have been offered internships in his Department since 8 May 2010. [53190]

Tim Loughton: Since 8 May 2010, the Department has taken 10 students on to its internship scheme. No students from the Bassetlaw constituency have been offered internships in that time.

All students undertaking an internship with the Department will have met the nationality criteria. Further information can be found on the civil service website:

http://faststream.civilservice.gov.uk/Nationality-and-Immigration/UK-Nationals--British-Citizens/

Education: Mental Health

Chris Ruane: To ask the Secretary of State for Education what assessment his Department has made of the promotion and teaching of emotional intelligence in (a) primary and (b) secondary schools. [53691]

Mr Gibb: The Department has a limited amount of evidence on this issue from evaluations of the Social and Emotional Aspects of Learning (SEAL) programme. This programme was promoted by the then Department for Children, Schools and Families to support the development of children's emotional intelligence. The coalition Government wants to place more trust in school staff to drive improvement and exercise their professional judgment over which approach they adopt and has therefore ceased promoting this particular programme.

A national evaluation of SEAL in secondary schools conducted by Manchester University, published by the Department in October 2010, found that SEAL failed to impact significantly upon pupils' social and emotional skills, general mental health difficulties, pro-social behaviour or behaviour problems. The evaluation can be accessed at:

https://www.education.gov.uk/publications/standard/publicationDetail/Page1/DFE-RR049

An evaluation of primary SEAL published in 2008, focusing on small group work, found mixed evidence for the effectiveness of the small group work. The review can be accessed at:

https://www.education.gov.uk/publications/standard/publicationDetail/Page1/DCSF-RB064

Further Education: Free School Meals

Lisa Nandy: To ask the Secretary of State for Education how many students in (a) sixth form colleges and (b) further education colleges are in receipt of free school meals. [52671]

Mr Gibb: Free school meals are not available to students attending sixth form colleges or further education colleges.

5 May 2011 : Column 919W

Local Authorities

Charlotte Leslie: To ask the Secretary of State for Education which local authorities have been subject to a partial or full intervention since 1997. [53586]

Tim Loughton: The Department for Education’s records show that, since 1997, the Secretary of State for Education has issued directions, using powers in section 497A of the Education Act 1996, to the following local authorities: Bradford, Cornwall, Doncaster, Essex, Hackney, Haringey, Isles of Scilly, Islington, Leeds, Milton Keynes, Southwark, Stoke-on-Trent, Swindon, Walsall, Waltham Forest and Wokingham.

Since 2008, Ministers have issued Improvement Notices to the following additional authorities: Birmingham, Calderdale, Cheshire West and Chester, Gloucestershire, Kent, Leeds, Leicester City, Nottinghamshire Peterborough, Rotherham, Sandwell, Salford, Surrey, Torbay, Warrington, West Sussex and Worcestershire.

Other authorities have been subject to less formal performance improvement engagement with the Department, which has sometimes been described as intervention, and which has included enhanced monitoring, challenge and support.

Members: Correspondence

Mr Winnick: To ask the Secretary of State for Education (1) when he plans to respond to the letter of 9 March 2011 from the hon. Member for Walsall North (Mr Winnick), which was transferred from the Treasury, reference 2011/0026547; [53792]

(2) when the he plans to respond to the letter of 5 April 2011 from the hon. Member for Walsall North (Mr Winnick) regarding a constituent. [53793]

Tim Loughton [holding answer 3 May 2011]: The hon. Member for Walsall North's letters of 9 March and 5 April were responded to on 27 April 2011. Please accept my apologies for the delay in responding to the letter from 9 March.

Music: Education

Ben Gummer: To ask the Secretary of State for Education if he will press local authorities to (a) implement the recommendations of the Henley Review of music education and (b) maintain support for music services at current levels. [53265]

Mr Gibb: Local authorities have a lead role in local music education delivering high quality opportunities to children and young people. They will be directly funded to undertake this role for 2011-12. They, along with others, will be well placed to lead local approaches to the more coherent and accountable local delivery of music education that Mr Henley called for in his review, such as by creating Music Education Hubs.

We shall be setting out our detailed plans later this year in a National Plan for Music Education. This will include the role we expect LAs to play in the provision of music education in their area.

5 May 2011 : Column 920W

Personal, Social, Health and Economic Education

Mrs Hodgson: To ask the Secretary of State for Education which external (a) organisations and (b) individuals are contributing to his Department's review of personal, social, health and economic education. [52662]

Mr Gibb: Further details of the review of personal, social, health and economic (PSHE) education will be announced shortly. We intend to publicise details of the organisations and individuals that have contributed to the review at the end of the process.

Mrs Hodgson: To ask the Secretary of State for Education by what mechanism his Department plans to ensure that the views of young people are taken into consideration during its review of personal, social, health and economic education. [52663]

Mr Gibb: Further details of the review of personal, social, health and economic (PSHE) education will be announced shortly. At that stage, we intend to set out how the views of young people are to be taken into consideration during the review.

Schools: Libraries

Kevin Brennan: To ask the Secretary of State for Education what steps he plans to take to implement the recommendations of the School Library Commission report “School Libraries: A Plan for Improvement”. [52960]

Mr Gibb: I refer the hon. Member to the reply which I gave on 14 October 2010, Official Report, column 379W, to the hon. Member for Colchester (Bob Russell).

The Commission’s report was published last September.

While the provision of a school library is not compulsory, a good school library is a valuable resource for pupils and teachers. The Government therefore welcomed last year’s report from the Commission, set up by the National Literacy Trust and Museums, Libraries and Archives, “School Libraries: A Plan for Improvement”, on the future role for school libraries and schools’ library services.

The Department agrees that good school libraries and school library services make an important contribution to children’s literacy, and that schools are well placed to identify what provision best meets their educational needs.

Teach First: Bristol

Charlotte Leslie: To ask the Secretary of State for Education whether he has had any discussions with Teach First about operations in Bristol. [53585]

Mr Gibb: The possibility of Teach First moving to Bristol, as part of expansion to the South West, has been discussed in the past at departmental level. Teach First is developing proposals for its expansion, as agreed by the Secretary of State for Education in a letter to its chief executive in March this year, which will be submitted to the Department in due course.

5 May 2011 : Column 921W

Teenage Pregnancy

Mrs Hodgson: To ask the Secretary of State for Education what discussions Ministers and officials in his Department have had with (a) local authorities and (b) sexual health charities prior to the decision to include funding for teenage pregnancy services within the early intervention grant. [52664]

Sarah Teather: The Department for Education has regular discussions with local authority representative bodies and did so during the development of the early intervention grant (EIG).

There were no specific discussions with sexual health charities prior to the creation of the EIG. However, my officials and I have had regular discussions about teenage pregnancy policy through meetings with the Teenage Pregnancy Independent Advisory Group and the Teenage Pregnancy Unit forum for non-statutory organisations.

5 May 2011 : Column 922W

The early intervention grant is an unringfenced and unhypothecated funding stream that gives local authorities greater flexibility to target resources strategically and intervene early to improve outcomes for children, young people and families. The early intervention grant provides funding for teenage pregnancy and gives areas flexibility to coordinate their efforts in a way that meets local need.

Chris Ruane: To ask the Secretary of State for Education what proportion of girls aged between 13 and 19 years and (a) in care and (b) not in care gave birth in each region in each of the last 10 years. [52700]

Tim Loughton: Information on the number and percentage of looked after girls in each region aged between 13 and 19 who are mothers, for the years 2005 to 2010, is included in table 1 as follows. The earliest year for which this information is available is 2005.

Table 1: Number and percentage of girls in care aged between 13 and 19 who were mothers during the years ending 31 March 2005 to 2010 (1,2,3,4) . Coverage: England
Number and percentages
  Number of girls in care aged between 13 and 19 looked after during the year ending 31 March 2005 to 2010

2005 2006 2007 2008 2009 2010

All children

11,800

11,900

11,800

11,500

11,500

12,100

North East

550

520

580

580

610

630

North West

1,800

1,900

1,900

1,800

1,900

1,900

Yorkshire and the Humber

1,200

1,200

1,200

1,200

1,100

1,100

East Midlands

670

690

700

690

710

750

West Midlands

1,200

1,300

1,300

1,300

1,400

1,400

East of England

1,000

1,000

1,100

1,100

1,100

1,300

Inner London

1,400

1,300

1,300

1,100

1,100

1,200

Outer London

1,400

1,400

1,300

1,200

1,200

1,200

South East

1,500

1,500

1,500

1,500

1,500

1,500

South West

1,000

950

930

930

950

1,070

Number and percentages
  Number of girls in care aged between 13 and 19 who were mothers during the year ending 31 March 2005 to 2010

2005 2006 2007 2008 2009 2010

All children

290

300

360

320

350

350

North East

10

10

10

20

20

30

North West

40

40

40

40

40

40

Yorkshire and the Humber

30

40

40

40

40

40

East Midlands

10

20

30

20

20

20

West Midlands

30

20

30

30

30

30

East of England

10

20

30

20

30

30

Inner London

70

60

70

60

70

70

Outer London

50

50

50

50

40

50

South East

20

30

30

30

50

40

South West

20

20

20

20

20

20

Number and percentage
  Percentage of girls in care aged between 13 and 19 who were mothers during the year ending 31 March 2005 to 2010

2005 2006 2007 2008 2009 2010

All children

3

3

3

3

3

3

North East

2

2

2

3

3

4

North West

2

2

2

2

2

2

Yorkshire and the Humber

2

3

3

3

4

3

East Midlands

2

2

4

3

3

3

West Midlands

2

2

2

2

2

2

East of England

1

2

2

2

2

2

Inner London

5

4

6

5

6

5

5 May 2011 : Column 923W

5 May 2011 : Column 924W

Outer London

4

3

4

4

3

4

South East

1

2

2

2

3

3

South West

2

2

2

2

2

2

(1) Numbers have been rounded to the nearest 100 if they exceed 1,000, and to the nearest 10 otherwise. (2) Percentages have been rounded to the nearest whole number. (3) Figures exclude children looked after under an agreed series of short-term placements. (4) Historical data may differ from older publications. This is mainly due to the implementation of amendments and corrections sent by some local authorities after the publication date of previous materials.

Information on the percentage of girls in each region not in care who were mothers is not available. A national estimate for all girls aged 14 to 19 who were mothers has been provided by the Office for National Statistics (ONS), this is shown in table 2 as follows. Please note that a regional breakdown or comparable information for girls aged 13 to 19 is not available.

Table 2 : Estimated women and mothers aged 14 to 19, England and Wales, 2005-09

2005 2006 2007 2008 2009

Female population aged 14 to 19 inclusive (from ONS mid-year population estimates)

2,045,590

2,049,770

2,050,620

2,039,520

2,024,420

Estimated number of women aged 14 to 19 who have had at least one live birth

45,600

44,330

44,150

43,130

42,630

Percentage of women aged 14 to 19 who have had at least one live birth

2.2

2.2

2.2

2.1

2.1

Notes: 1. Estimates of the number of women who have had at least one live birth are from an ONS birth order model that combines data from birth registrations with survey data on fertility histories to estimate birth order, and then combines these with population estimates to produce the female population by parity. 2. The percentage of women in a particular age group who have had at least one live birth (ie are mothers) is not the same as a birth rate for that age group, which would show the proportion of women who give birth in a specific calendar year. 3. Because the percentage of women with at least one birth increases with age, any comparison of the figures above with figures for females in care may be affected if the female population in care aged 14-19 has a different age structure form the overall female population aged 14-19. 4. Estimates have been rounded to the nearest 10. Source: Fertility and Family Analysis Unit, Office for National Statistics

Health

Accident and Emergency Departments

Paul Flynn: To ask the Secretary of State for Health when the pilot studies on accident and emergency and urgent care centre nomenclature in (a) East Lancashire, (b) Manchester and (c) Salisbury were completed; and when the results of those studies were referred to him. [53577]

Mr Simon Burns: The work being carried out by NHS North West and NHS South West on nomenclature for urgent and emergency care services has not yet been completed.

Helen Goodman: To ask the Secretary of State for Health (1) what proportion of 111 calls led to admission to accident and emergency departments in County Durham in the latest period for which figures are available; [53707]

(2) what proportion of 111 calls have led to the despatch of an ambulance in the latest period for which figures are available; [53710]

(3) how many (a) 111 calls and (b) 999 calls to ambulance services have been made from County Durham in the last 12 months. [53713]

Mr Simon Burns: There is no direct information on this. However, as part of their evaluation of the four national health service 111 pilot sites, the university of Sheffield will shortly publish their interim report. A copy will be made available in the Library. This will contain data on the proportion of people who call NHS 111 who are recommended to attend an accident and emergency department, the proportion of people who call NHS 111 for whom an ambulance is dispatched and the total number of calls to NHS 111.

Antidepressants

Stephen Williams: To ask the Secretary of State for Health how many prescriptions for (a) individual benzodiazepine drugs and (b) anti-depressants were dispensed by the NHS in 2010. [53672]

Mr Simon Burns: The information requested is shown in the following tables:

Table 1: N umber of benzodiazepine prescription items written in the United Kingdom and dispensed in the community in England in the year 2010, as classified as hypnotics and anxiolytics in British National Formulary (BNF) s ection 4.1.1 and 4.1.2
BNF chemical name Prescription items ( T housand)

Alprazolam

(1)

Chlordiazepoxide Hydrochloride

213.9

Diazepam

5,148.4

Flurazepam Hydrochloride

(1)

Loprazolam Mesilate

88.6

Lorazepam

968.3

Lormetazepam

60.5

Nitrazepam

1,035.2

Oxazepam

164.8

5 May 2011 : Column 925W

Temazepam

2,814.0

Total for BNF Section 4.1

10,493.7

(1) Less than 50 prescription items dispensed Source: Prescription Cost Analysis (PCA) system
Table 2: N umber of benzodiazepine prescription items written in the UK and dispensed in the community in England in the year 2010, as classified as antiepileptic drugs in British National Formulary (BNF) section 4.8.1
BNF chemical name Prescriptions items ( T housand)

Clobazam

185.8

Clonazepam

629.1

Midazolam

39.1

Midazolam Hydrochloride(1)

0.3

Total for BNF Section 4.8

854.3

(1) Oromucosal Hydrochloride pre-filled syringes—a new classification from the second quarter of 2010. Source: PCA system
Table 3: N umber of benzodiazepine prescription items written in the UK and dispensed in the community in England in the year 2010, as classified as anaesthesia drugs in British National Formulary (BNF) section 15.1.4
BNF chemical name Prescription items ( T housand)

Midazolam Hydrochloride

83.1

Total for BNF Section 15.1

83.1

Source: PCA system
Table 4: N umber of antidepressant prescription items written in the UK and dispensed in the community in England in the year 2010, as classified as antidepressant drugs in British National Formulary (BNF) section 4.3
BNF chemical name Number of items ( T housand)

Antidepressant drugs

42,788.0

Total for BNF Section 4.3

42,788.0

Source: PCA system

Childbirth: Overseas Students

Stephen Barclay: To ask the Secretary of State for Health how many people who entered the UK on student visas gave birth in NHS hospitals in England in the last 12 months for which figures are available. [54248]

Anne Milton: This information is not collected by the Department.

Community Nurses: Worcestershire

Harriett Baldwin: To ask the Secretary of State for Health how many district nurses have been employed at each grade in Worcestershire in each of the last five years. [53599]

Anne Milton: This information is not available in the format requested.

The number of district nurses in the Worcestershire primary care trust (PCT) area, as at 30 September, for each of the last five years is shown in the following table:

5 May 2011 : Column 926W

District nurse 1 (st) level

Headcount

2006

114

2007

108

2008

109

2009

93

2010

101

Notes: 1. Only 1st level (registered) district nurses have been reported as working in the Worcestershire PCT area from 2006-10; there have been no 2nd level (enrolled) district nurses reported in this area over this time. Nationally, 2nd level nurses are no longer trained and most 2nd level nurses have undertaken further training to become 1st level qualified. 2. The new headcount methodology for 2010 data is not fully comparable with previous years' data due to improvements that make it a more stringent count of absolute staff numbers. Source: The NHS Information Centre for health and social care.

Emergency Calls

Helen Goodman: To ask the Secretary of State for Health what training and qualifications are required of operators receiving (a) 111 calls and (b) 999 calls. [53708]

Mr Simon Burns: The organisation, operation and training requirements for NHS 111 advisers and ambulance control room staff are for the national health service to manage locally, and will depend on the clinical decision support systems they choose to use. However, for current NHS 111 pilots, the training of the NHS 111 advisers is of the same standard and rigour as that received by ambulance control room staff.

Helen Goodman: To ask the Secretary of State for Health what the average duration of a (a) 111 call and (b) 999 call to an ambulance service was in the latest period for which figures are available. [53709]

Mr Simon Burns: Data for March 2011 show that the average length of an NHS 111 episode was nine minutes. An NHS 111 episode is the total time taken to resolve the caller’s query. This will include any transfer to a nurse or other clinician for self-care advice for less urgent calls, or for an emergency call may include the call-handler staying on the line until the arrival of the ambulance to offer first aid advice and reassurance.

Data on the average length of a 999 call to an ambulance service are not held centrally.

Helen Goodman: To ask the Secretary of State for Health what proportion of (a) 111 calls and (b) 999 calls to ambulance services were categorised at urgency level (i) A, (ii) B and (iii) C in the latest period for which figures are available. [53711]

Mr Simon Burns: The information requested is not separately available for 111 calls, but is included in the overall figures for calls to the ambulance service.

Almost 8 million emergency calls were made to the ambulance service in 2009-10, of which 2.24 million were Category A, 3.1 million were Category B and 2.51 million were Category C. Annual statistical information for ambulance services will be published by the NHS Information Centre in June 2011.

5 May 2011 : Column 927W

Helen Goodman: To ask the Secretary of State for Health what proportion of (a) 111 calls and (b) 999 calls to ambulance services were found to have been wrongly categorised in the latest period for which figures are available. [53712]

Mr Simon Burns: This information is not held centrally.

The Department expects call handling of all emergency calls received by NHS 111 and the ambulance service to be effective and ensure that calls are prioritised accurately and that the most appropriate response is awarded based on the information the call handlers receive.

Helen Goodman: To ask the Secretary of State for Health what guidance his Department issues on the categorisation of (a) 111 calls and (b) 999 calls to ambulance services from women reporting (i) childbirth and (ii) miscarriages and other problems of late pregnancy. [53719]

Mr Simon Burns: The Department has not issued specific guidance on the categorisation of 111 and 999 calls to the ambulance service from women reporting childbirth, miscarriages and other problems of late pregnancy.

It is for the national health service 111 and ambulance services locally to determine which call handling system they use in order to provide safe categorisation of 111 and 999 calls received and ensure the most clinically appropriate response.

General Practitioners

Richard Drax: To ask the Secretary of State for Health whether GP consortia or GP practices are to be fundholders under his proposed NHS reforms. [53657]

Mr Simon Burns: General practitioner (GP) consortia and GP practices will not be fundholders. While fundholding and our proposals for GP-led commissioning consortia share certain principles, they differ greatly in detail. The intention is for GP consortia to be corporate statutory bodies established by statute to have the function of commissioning health services in accordance with the National Health Service Act 2006 as amended by the Bill. The consortium would be a legal body in its own right, separate from individual GP practices.

Richard Drax: To ask the Secretary of State for Health whether practices will be expected to undertake weekend callouts as part of his proposed NHS reforms. [53658]

Mr Simon Burns: The Government plan to put general practitioners (GPs) and other health professionals in charge of commissioning urgent care services including out-of-hours care. We believe that empowering GPs and other health professionals in this way will achieve better and more patient-focused services. This is not the same as requiring GP practices to provide those services themselves.

Mr Offord: To ask the Secretary of State for Health what recent progress his Department has made in establishing GP commissioning consortia in Hendon constituency and elsewhere in London. [53821]

5 May 2011 : Column 928W

Mr Simon Burns: The Department has established a rolling programme of pathfinders to test the different elements involved in general practitioner (GP) led commissioning and to enable emerging commissioning consortia to get more rapidly involved in current commissioning decisions.

Hendon is covered by the Barnet GP Commissioning Consortium, which has recently been awarded pathfinder status. There are now 37 pathfinders in London covering 86% of the capital’s population.

Mr Sanders: To ask the Secretary of State for Health what research studies he has reviewed which (a) indicate and (b) do not indicate a link between the introduction of GP commissioning consortia and an improvement in the ability of patients to choose healthcare providers. [53869]

Mr Simon Burns: As general practitioner (GP) commissioning consortia have yet to be established, research studies do not exist on the link between commissioning consortia and patient choice. However, the “Commissioning for patients (GP commissioning and the NHS Commissioning Board)” impact assessment outlines the evidence base for GP-led commissioning and improvements to access and choice.

Patients currently have a right to choose their health care provider when referred for a first out-patient appointment with a consultant-led team. We are committed to extending the opportunities for choice of provider and treatment.

Mr Sanders: To ask the Secretary of State for Health with reference to page 8 of the Health and Social Care Bill impact assessment, what the evidential basis is for his Department's conclusion that the establishment of GP consortia will improve access and choice; and what effects he expects such reforms to have on (a) health outcomes and (b) value for money. [53871]

Mr Simon Burns: The “Commissioning for patients (General Practitioner (GP) commissioning and the NHS Commissioning Board)” impact assessment outlined the evidence base for GP-led commissioning. Improvements in value for money and outcomes are expected to be driven by better alignment of clinical and financial incentives, and higher levels of clinical engagement that will lead to more responsive care, coordination and care planning, delivering clinically appropriate care closer to home.

The impact assessment also outlines the evidence base for improving access and choice. GPs play a pivotal role in helping to coordinate national health service care and in partnership with other health care professionals are best placed to understand the health needs of local populations.

Patients currently have a right to choose their health care provider when referred for a first outpatient appointment with a consultant-led team. We are committed to extending the opportunities for choice of provider and treatment.

The Health and Social Care Bill places a duty on consortia to reduce inequalities in access to health care and health care outcomes, promote patient and carer involvement in decisions about them and enable patients to make choices about aspects of their health care.

5 May 2011 : Column 929W

The changes to commissioning are estimated to save £10.6 billion over 10 years.

Mr Sanders: To ask the Secretary of State for Health (1) what steps he plans to take to mitigate any risk of wider health inequalities arising from the implementation of GP commissioning; [53873]

(2) what assessment he has made of the potential effects of his proposals for GP commissioning on health inequalities. [53877]

Mr Simon Burns: The Health and Social Care Bill proposes a new legal duty on health inequalities for the national health service. Subject to parliamentary approval, the NHS Commissioning Board and commissioning consortia must have regard to reducing inequalities in access to, and outcomes of, health care.

The NHS Outcomes Framework sets out the outcomes and corresponding indicators that, from 2012-13, will be used to hold the NHS Commissioning Board to account for the outcomes it delivers through commissioning health services. One of the underpinning principles when developing this framework has been the need to reduce inequalities in health outcomes. We have committed to work to improve data collections so that more indicators in the framework can be disaggregated by inequalities dimensions, socio-economic group and area deprivation, to support NHS action on reducing health inequalities.

The NHS Commissioning Board will draw on the national outcome goals in the Outcomes Framework to develop a Commissioning Outcomes Framework, to help hold commissioning consortia to account for effective commissioning and to promote improvements in quality.

We are also proposing that local authorities and their partner general practitioner commissioning consortia develop joint health and wellbeing strategies, drawing on Joint Strategic Needs Assessments. These assessments look in detail at local health inequalities and are a key tool for commissioners to use as a basis for understanding need across their area and between different groups within the local population.

Mr Sanders: To ask the Secretary of State for Health what account he plans to take of the conclusions of the practice-based commissioning group and independent leads survey: wave 3 in determining any amendments to the Health and Social Care Bill he plans to bring forward. [53874]

Mr Simon Burns: The impact assessment that accompanies the Health and Social Care Bill sets out the Government's assessment of the available evidence on practice-based commissioning and includes reflections on responses from the practice-based commissioning survey.

The Government are taking advantage of the natural break in the passage of the Health and Social Care Bill to pause, listen, reflect and improve on the legislation, bringing together views from patients, the public, national health service staff and wider stakeholders. As part of the NHS Listening Exercise, the NHS Future Forum has been established to provide an independent ear, and will feed back what they hear in a report to the Government at the end of May.

5 May 2011 : Column 930W

The Government will reflect on the report from the forum, representations from other stakeholders and all available evidence in considering improvements to the Bill.

Mr Sanders: To ask the Secretary of State for Health if he will make an assessment of the optimum size of a GP commissioning consortium necessary to ensure (a) value for money and (b) health equality. [53875]

Mr Simon Burns: The history of national health service commissioning has shown that there is no “right” size for a commissioning organisation. Therefore, we will allow for smaller consortia to collaborate with other consortia where large scale matters, and will allow larger consortia to break down into smaller localities where this makes more sense. The Health and Social Care Bill will provide for consortia boundaries to flex rather than be fixed.

In relation to size, a key criterion for the NHS Commissioning Board in authorising consortia will be to satisfy itself that prospective consortia have made appropriate arrangements to ensure they can discharge their functions and that they have an appropriate area (for example, for the purposes of their duties in relation to accident and emergency services).

Mr Sanders: To ask the Secretary of State for Health if he will make an assessment of the ability of primary care trusts to collect and analyse data on health outcomes; and if he will assess the potential effects of the introduction of GP commissioning on the collection and analysis of such data. [53876]

Mr Simon Burns: Health outcomes data are readily available from a wide variety of sources that primary care trusts can and do access and these will continue to be available under general practitioner (GP) commissioning. In addition, under the proposals for GP commissioning, there will be a duty to improve continuously the quality of services and outcomes for patients. GPs have indicated support for using information to help them do this.

The NHS Outcomes Framework published in December 2010 provides the framework for the development of clinical indicators. A programme of work is under way to analyse information requirements around outcome measures against the data that are currently collected.

Valerie Vaz: To ask the Secretary of State for Health whether public health consultants working with GP commissioning consortia will be funded from (a) consortia budgets and (b) ring-fenced local authority public health budgets. [54141]

Mr Simon Burns: Once responsibilities and funding transfer to general practitioner commissioning consortia and local authorities from 2013, they will be responsible for deciding how their budgets are spent.

A consultation on the functions and services to be funded from the public health budget (“Healthy Lives, Healthy People: consultation on the funding and commissioning routes for public health”) closed on 31 March and responses are now being considered. The consultation posed questions on whether any particular services should be mandatory for local authorities to provide or commission, and what essential conditions

5 May 2011 : Column 931W

should be placed on the ring-fenced grant to ensure the successful transition of responsibility for public health to local authorities. The Department will formally respond to the consultation shortly, setting out the detail of the split of responsibilities.

The new public health responsibilities of local authorities will be funded through public health ring-fenced grants; this includes the costs of employing directors of public health and their teams.

Valerie Vaz: To ask the Secretary of State for Health whether he is taking steps to ensure that GP practices do not require their patients to use telephone numbers that are more expensive to call than geographic numbers, as stipulated in the Standard General Medical Services contract, section 29b. [54244]

Mr Simon Burns: The Department issued guidance and directions to the national health service on 21 December 2009 which stated that NHS bodies and general practitioner practices should not enter into new, renew, or extend, contracts for telephone services unless they can be satisfied that patients will not pay more than they would to make equivalent calls to a geographical number.

It is the responsibility of primary care trusts to ensure that local practices are compliant with the directions and guidance.

Health Education

Jim Dobbin: To ask the Secretary of State for Health what mechanisms he plans to put in place for the training of NHS staff to fulfil the commitment in his Department's Public Health White paper to encourage people to take responsibility for their health; and if he will make a statement. [53608]

Anne Milton: In the Public Health White Paper “Healthy Lives, Healthy People”, it was announced that a detailed workforce strategy to support public health is to be developed by autumn 2011, working with representative organisations. Informed by the views of people on the frontline of public health delivery it will set out how a supply of highly trained and motivated staff, with the appropriate skills for understanding the range of public health interventions, providing public health advice and commissioning the services communities require, can be sustained and grown, as needed.

Jim Dobbin: To ask the Secretary of State for Health (1) with reference to his Department's Public Health White Paper, what steps he plans to take to encourage the public to take personal responsibility for their health; and if he will make a statement; [53610]

(2) with reference to his Department's document, Healthy Lives, Healthy People, paragraphs 2 and 9d, what steps he plans to take to achieve the commitment to build people's self-esteem, confidence and personal responsibility right from infancy; and if he will make a statement. [53612]

Mr Simon Burns: The White Paper, “Healthy Lives, Healthy People: Our strategy for public health” in England, sets out the Government's vision for public health,

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including the creation of a new public health service—Public Health England—with a renewed focus on disease prevention, health protection and improvement.

The Government have reinforced their commitment to tackling the preventable causes of ill-health by announcing their intention to give local authorities ring-fenced public health budgets to improve the health of their local population. A new health premium will reward progress on specific public health outcomes.

The Government are taking a number of actions in order to provide the public with the information and support they need to make healthy choices and lead healthier lives. The Change4Life campaign still helps influence and shift behaviours around diet and physical activity, by giving families helpful advice on eating well and being more active. More than 1 million mothers say they have made changes as a result of the Change4Life campaign.

The National Child Measurement Programme enables and encourages families to make healthier lifestyle choices by routinely providing parents, whose children have been weighed and measured, with feedback on their child's height, weight and body mass index centile, alongside advice on healthy eating, physical activity and local weight management services.

The introduction of Out of Home Calorie Labelling, as one of the pledges of the Public Responsibility Deal, is also intended to empower people to make healthier choices more often, specifically when eating out.

The Department has also been working with the four United Kingdom chief medical officers to develop revised UK-wide physical activity guidelines. These guidelines are primarily aimed at policy makers and health professionals. However as they provide information on the types and amounts of physical activity for health benefits, when incorporated into existing campaigns and messages they will help individuals to take personal responsibility for their health and well-being.

All healthcare professionals have a responsibility to ensure that they make every contact with patients/the public count. This should include highlighting the impact of people's lifestyle choices and their health and well-being, as well as providing advice and support on how they can change these behaviours.

Health Insurance

Stephen Barclay: To ask the Secretary of State for Health what discussions he has had with the NHS Litigation Authority on the allocation of risk between the NHS and private medical insurers in respect of cerebral palsy claims. [54312]

Mr Simon Burns: The Department has had no specific discussions with the NHS Litigation Authority on the allocation of risk in respect of cerebral palsy claims. Agreement between parties on the handling of claims is made on a case-by-case basis, taking into account the available medical evidence and opinion as well as previous rulings of the court. Where agreement cannot be reached, it would ultimately be for the court to decide.

Stephen Barclay: To ask the Secretary of State for Health what assessment he has made of the potential effects of changes to insurance premiums for private obstetrics, including the potential effect on NHS (a) service provision and (b) revenue. [54313]

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Mr Simon Burns: The Department has made no such assessment.

Health Services: Overseas Visitors

Julian Sturdy: To ask the Secretary of State for Health what steps his Department plans to take to improve the (a) administration and (b) recovery rate of outstanding liabilities from overseas visitors who use NHS services while in England; and if he will make a statement. [53614]

Mr Simon Burns: The Government announced on 18 March that they will amend the immigration rules to allow a person with an outstanding debt to the national health service of £1,000 or more to be refused a new visa or extension of stay until the debt is paid.

The Government also announced that they will review the rules and practices around charging overseas visitors to the United Kingdom for NHS treatment, including establishing more effective and efficient processes across the NHS to screen for eligibility and to make and recover charges.

Health: Equality

Mr Sanders: To ask the Secretary of State for Health what steps he is taking to increase the evidence base on the effects of commissioning models on health inequalities; and if he will make a statement. [53722]

Mr Simon Burns: The extent of health inequalities is well documented and measured; and the knowledge base is now sufficient to provide a basis for local, evidence-based and cost-effective interventions.

The potential for commissioning to impact on and narrow health inequalities is significant. Commissioning will need to address differences in health status across the local population and the drivers of inequalities, and seek to improve the poor health outcomes experienced by disadvantaged groups and areas, and reduce unacceptable variations in access to and outcomes of care.

The Health and Social Care Bill proposes a new legal duty on health inequalities for the national health service. Subject to parliamentary approval, the NHS Commissioning Board and general practitioner commissioning consortia must have regard to reducing inequalities in access to, and outcomes of, health care.

Heart Diseases: Children

Mr MacShane: To ask the Secretary of State for Health whether hospital trusts were given the opportunity to correct errors of fact in Sir Ian Kennedy's review of children's cardiac surgery units. [53743]

Mr Simon Burns: The review of children's cardiac services (Safe and Sustainable review) is being conducted by the NHS Specialised Commissioning Team. We have however been following its progress.

Hospital trusts were given the opportunity to correct errors of fact in Sir Ian Kennedy's assessment of children's cardiac surgery units against service standards. Trusts' comments were considered by the assessment panel.

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Hospitals: Infectious Diseases

Chris Ruane: To ask the Secretary of State for Health what assessment the NHS has made of the merits of the use of copper-covered fixtures and fittings in high usage areas of hospitals in limiting the spread of MRSA and other superbugs. [53696]

Mr Simon Burns: Studies in a national health service hospital show that copper coated fittings have lower levels of bacterial contamination than standard equivalent items. However, evidence that antimicrobial surfaces decrease health care associated infections is required before the use of copper coating could be recommended.

Mental Illness: Offenders

Bill Esterson: To ask the Secretary of State for Health (1) what his policy is on the requirement on NHS trusts to liaise with the police and the criminal justice system only where the defendant has a diagnosis of severe mental illness; and if he will take steps to ensure comprehensive liaison between the police, criminal justice system and NHS staff in criminal cases in which the defendant has a history of mental health problems that are relevant to the investigation and which remain undiagnosed; [54307]

(2) what his policy is on liaison between the police and NHS staff in criminal cases in which the defendant has a history of undiagnosed mental health problems that are relevant to the investigation; and if he will take steps to ensure that all relevant mental health problems, including those that remain undiagnosed, are taken into account before a decision to seek prosecution. [54308]

Paul Burstow: We are committed to a roll-out of diversion services in all police custody suites and criminal courts by 2014. In relation to practice in police station custody suites, diversion services will look to identify and assess those offenders who present with mental health, learning disability and substance misuse issues and to ensure their health needs are met.

Appropriate information gained from those assessments will be shared with agencies along the criminal justice pathway, to inform decisions such as case management, charging and sentencing.

Muscular Dystrophy

Jack Dromey: To ask the Secretary of State for Health what progress is being made by the National Institute for Health and Clinical Excellence in establishing a guideline for Duchenne muscular dystrophy; and if he will make a statement. [53588]

Paul Burstow: The National Institute for Health and Clinical Excellence is not currently developing a clinical guideline on Duchenne muscular dystrophy.

The National Quality Board is working with the wider clinical community to prepare a draft version of a library of quality standard topics that will go out for public consultation later in the year.

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Neuromuscular Diseases: North West England

Jim Dobbin: To ask the Secretary of State for Health what progress has been made by the NHS North West Specialised Commissioning Group in reviewing neuromuscular services in the region; and if he will make a statement. [53606]

Paul Burstow: The North West Specialisted Commissioning Group completed the review of neuromuscular services at the end of March 2011. The findings of the review have been circulated to all primary care trust chief executives in the North West strategic health authority area with a request that it is shared with board members and general practitioner commissioning consortia leads.

NHS: Procurement

Mr Sanders: To ask the Secretary of State for Health what his policy is on promoting diversity in the procurement process for health care services. [53870]

Mr Simon Burns: The Department’s guidance on procurement is set out in the “Procurement guide for commissioners of NHS-funded services”. A copy of the guidance has been placed in the Library and is available on the Department’s website at:

www.dh.gov.uk/en/Publicationsandstatistics/Publications/PublicationsPolicyAndGuidance/DH_118218

Commissioners of health care services, when using procurement as a means to deliver best quality for patients and value for the taxpayer, are expected to demonstrate consistency with the overarching principles of public procurement. These principles are:

Transparency;

Proportionality;

Non-discrimination; and

Equality of Treatment.

Mr Sanders: To ask the Secretary of State for Health what steps he is taking to increase the provision of formal qualifications for health care commissioning skills. [53872]

Mr Simon Burns: Health care commissioning has generic and specialist elements and is multidisciplinary in nature. Individuals are recruited to ensure that commissioning can benefit from a number of professional and specialist skills, for example, finance, accountancy, procurement, programme and project management, statistical and informatics skills as well as from health care professionals from a range of disciplines, and public health communications specialists. The requirement for individuals to have formal qualifications will be reflected in job descriptions and reflected both in the recruitment processes for individuals and in terms of ongoing development for individuals.

The National Leadership Council is also working in collaboration with the NHS Institute for Innovation and Improvement to offer leaders of general practitioner pathfinders and their teams appropriate development tools during the transition to the new system.

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NHS: Standards

Mr Sanders: To ask the Secretary of State for Health what assessment he has made of the effect on health outcomes of the World Class Commissioning assurance framework. [53868]

Mr Simon Burns: The World Class Commissioning assurance framework assessed primary care trusts’ (PCT’s) commissioning capabilities across three elements; outcomes, competencies and governance.

The capability of PCTs was assessed in 2009 and 2010. It was recognised that it takes time to drive tangible change in outcomes. PCTs were not formally rated against their outcomes in 2009 or 2010.

The assurance framework has since been discontinued.

North Yorkshire and York Primary Care Trust

Julian Sturdy: To ask the Secretary of State for Health what the cost of operating the North Yorkshire and York Primary Care Trust was in the last 12 months. [53616]

Mr Simon Burns: The cost of operating a primary care trust (PCT) can be interpreted in two ways:

(a) the net operating costs of a PCT (i.e. their total expenditure less any miscellaneous revenue).

(b) the running costs of the PCX (the administrative costs of running the PCT).

The net operating cost of North Yorkshire and York Primary Care Trust in 2009-10 was £1,179 million. 2009-10 is the latest period for which figures are available.

There is no separately identifiable figure for ‘running costs’ (interpretation (b) above) in the financial data the Department has historically collected. From 2010-11, PCTs and strategic health authorities will be required to report running costs to the Department. 2010-11 data will be available in late July.

Northwick Park Hospital: Manpower

Mr Thomas: To ask the Secretary of State for Health how many (a) medical and (b) non-medical staff were employed at Northwick Park Hospital on 1 April 2011; and if he will make a statement. [54311]

Mr Simon Burns: The information requested is not available. The following table shows the number of national health service staff employed at the North West London Hospitals NHS Trust as at 31 January 2011.

National health service hospital and community health services: National health service staff in the North West London Hospitals NHS Trust as at 31 January 2011

Headcount

All national health service staff

4,798

Medical and dental staff

754

All non-medical staff

4,044

Professionally qualified clinical staff total

2,383

Qualified nursing, midwifery and health visiting

1,649

Qualified scientific, therapeutic and technical (ST&T) staff

734

Support to clinical staff total

1,269

Support to doctors and nursing staff

1,005

Support to ST&T staff

265

NHS infrastructure support total

396

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Central functions

247

Hotel, property and estates staff

67

Managers and senior managers

82

Notes: 1. January 2011 is the latest available data. 2. Headcount totals are unlikely to equal the sum of components. Further information on the headcount methodology is available in the census publication here: www.ic.nhs.uk/webfiles/publications/010_Workforce/nhsstaff0010/Census_Bulletin_March_2011_Final.pdf 3. Data Quality The NHS Information Centre for health and social care seeks to minimise inaccuracies and the effect of missing and invalid data but responsibility for data accuracy lies with the organisations providing the data. Methods are continually being updated to improve data quality where changes impact on figures already published. This is assessed but unless it is significant at national level figures are not changed. Impact at detailed or local level is footnoted in relevant analyses. Sources: The NHS Information Centre for health and social care monthly work force statistics—Provisional, Experimental Statistics

Respiratory Diseases: Medical Treatments

Jack Dromey: To ask the Secretary of State for Health what recent assessment he has made of the adequacy of NHS provision of ventilation machines for patients with respiratory difficulties. [53598]

Mr Simon Burns: The provision of ventilation machines for people with respiratory difficulties is for local determination. The Department recommended in the “Consultation on a Strategy for Services for Chronic Respiratory Disease (COPD) in England” published in February 2010 that all people with acute respiratory failure should be offered treatment with non-invasive ventilation with access to mechanical ventilation, if required.

Home Department

Animal Experiments

Mr Laurence Robertson: To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department what recent assessment she has made of the prevalence of the use of animals in the testing of household cleaning products and their ingredients; what recent discussions she has had with companies involved in the manufacture of such products to discuss the need for such testing; and if she will make a statement. [53932]

Lynne Featherstone: The number of animals used for the testing of substances used in household products in the United Kingdom is low. The Statistics of Scientific Procedures on Living Animals, published annually, record that in 2003, 2004, 2005, 2006, 2007, 2008 and 2009 (the most recent year for which we have figures) the numbers used in this category of testing were, respectively, 234, 272, 111, 0, 1, 132 and 0. The coalition agreement includes a commitment to end the testing of household products on animals and we are working on a strategy to deliver this commitment. We have held discussions with manufacturers, contract research organisations and the European Union Institute for Health and Consumer Products in connection with this work.

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Criminal Records

Mr Laurence Robertson: To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department whether her Department's review of the portability of Criminal Records Bureau checks will address the requirement for dentists to undergo a check for each practice in which they work; and if she will make a statement. [54139]

Lynne Featherstone: Following the report of Phase 1 of the independent review of the criminal records regime, measures have been included within the Protection of Freedoms Bill to increase the portability of Criminal Records Bureau (CRB) disclosures. This will enable employers to check whether any new information has come to light since a previous disclosure was issued. The review has not looked at specific occupations, but increased portability will be available to all those who apply for enhanced CRB disclosures, including dentists.

Domestic Violence

Emma Reynolds: To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department what amendments she plans to propose to the draft Convention on Preventing and Combating Violence against Women and Domestic Violence in the Council of Europe Committee of Ministers. [54237]

Lynne Featherstone: The drafting process on this convention is now complete and the convention was passed for adoption by the Committee of Ministers on 7 April. No further amendments are therefore possible to the convention wording.

Domestic Violence: Police

Fiona Mactaggart: To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department how many specialist police officers dealing with domestic violence there were (a) on the most recent date for which figures are available and (b) in May 2010. [54255]

Lynne Featherstone: This information is not held centrally by the Home Office.

Each of the 43 force areas have a specialist domestic violence lead responsible for informing and guiding officers handling domestic violence cases, as well as providing specialist support to victims and working in partnership with other organisations across their local area.

Prostitution: Advertising

Mr Straw: To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department what proposals she plans to bring forward to prevent the advertisement of sexual services in the media. [53907]

Lynne Featherstone: We do not believe it is appropriate to advertise sexual services in local newspapers and welcome the guidance published on this by the Newspaper Society in recent years. An outright ban on advertising sexual services would require legislation which we do not believe would be effectively enforceable. We will look at this issue more closely and consider what more can be done to prevent advertising of sexual services in the media.