Married People

Chris Ruane: To ask the Minister for the Cabinet Office what proportion of adults in each local authority area were identified as married in the latest period for which figures are available. [56793]

24 May 2011 : Column 616W

Mr Hurd: The information requested falls within the responsibility of the UK Statistics Authority. I have asked the authority to reply to the hon. Member. A copy of their response will be placed in the Library.

Letter from Stephen Penneck, dated May 2011:

As Director General for the Office for National Statistics, I have been asked to reply to your Parliamentary Question asking what proportion of adults in each local authority area were identified as married in the latest period for which figures are available. (56793)

The Annual Population Survey provides the best estimates of adults living in households who are married by local authority. The most recent statistics available are for 2009. Table 1 shows the proportion of adults in each local authority area who were married. In this instance an adult is considered to be aged 16 or over as this is the age at which it is legal to get married. Because the proportions come from a survey, they are subject to a margin of error.

Table 1: Percentage of those aged 16 or over who are married by local authority, UK, 2009
Local authority Percentage

City of London

Barking and Dagenham

47

Barnet

48

Bexley

54

Brent

50

Bromley

53

Camden

37

Croydon

46

Ealing

45

Enfield

49

Greenwich

49

Hackney

36

Hammersmith and Fulham

39

Haringey

40

Harrow

54

Havering

51

Hillingdon

50

Hounslow

52

Islington

32

Kensington and Chelsea

44

Kingston upon Thames

47

Lambeth

31

Lewisham

37

Merton

51

Newham

43

Redbridge

56

Richmond upon Thames

53

Southwark

38

Sutton

53

Tower Hamlets

38

Waltham Forest

42

Wandsworth

33

Westminster

40

Bolton

50

Bury

53

Manchester

36

Oldham

53

Rochdale

52

Salford

41

Stockport

53

Tameside

51

Trafford

53

Wigan

53

Knowsley

44

Liverpool

40

St Helens

55

24 May 2011 : Column 617W

Sefton

50

Wirral

50

Barnsley

51

Doncaster

53

Rotherham

54

Sheffield

47

Gateshead

47

Newcastle upon Tyne

43

North Tyneside

52

South Tyneside

50

Sunderland

49

Birmingham

49

Coventry

49

Dudley

54

Sandwell

48

Solihull

58

Walsall

52

Wolverhampton

48

Bradford

55

Calderdale

52

Kirklees

59

Leeds

43

Wakefield

50

Hartlepool

48

Middlesbrough

47

Redcar and Cleveland

54

Stockton-on-Tees

52

Darlington

54

Halton

50

Warrington

55

Blackburn with Darwen

54

Blackpool

44

Kingston upon Hull, City of

44

East Riding of Yorkshire

59

North East Lincolnshire

50

North Lincolnshire

57

York

51

Derby

52

Leicester

49

Rutland

60

Nottingham

38

Herefordshire, County of

57

Telford and Wrekin

55

Stoke-on-Trent

52

Bath and North East Somerset

49

Bristol, City of

41

North Somerset

58

South Gloucestershire

59

Plymouth

47

Torbay

52

Bournemouth

44

Poole

54

Swindon

53

Peterborough

52

Luton

52

Southend-on-Sea

51

Thurrock

56

Medway

55

Bracknell Forest

58

West Berkshire

60

Reading

51

Slough

54

Windsor and Maidenhead

56

Wokingham

63

24 May 2011 : Column 618W

Milton Keynes

55

Brighton and Hove

36

Portsmouth

45

Southampton

44

Isle of Wight

54

Mid Bedfordshire

55

Bedford

54

South Bedfordshire

58

Aylesbury Vale

58

Chiltern

60

South Bucks

60

Wycombe

58

Cambridge

43

East Cambridgeshire

61

Fenland

53

Huntingdonshire

58

South Cambridgeshire

58

Chester

54

Congleton

61

Crewe and Nantwich

57

Ellesmere Port and Neston

56

Macclesfield

61

Vale Royal

58

Caradon

65

Carrick

54

Kerrier

61

North Cornwall

65

Penwith

45

Restormel

58

Allerdale

66

Barrow-in-Furness

49

Carlisle

54

Copeland

59

Eden

69

South Lakeland

59

Amber Valley

55

Bolsover

59

Chesterfield

54

Derbyshire Dales

65

Erewash

57

High Peak

57

North East Derbyshire

55

South Derbyshire

58

East Devon

62

Exeter

45

Mid Devon

61

North Devon

60

South Hams

59

Teignbridge

57

Torridge

59

West Devon

60

Christchurch

55

East Dorset

65

North Dorset

58

Purbeck

52

West Dorset

64

Weymouth and Portland

48

Chester-le-Street

48

Derwentside

57

Durham

51

Easington

49

Sedgefield

52

Teesdale

50

Wear Valley

54

24 May 2011 : Column 619W

Eastbourne

49

Hastings

46

Lewes

58

Rother

57

Wealden

60

Basildon

50

Braintree

53

Brentwood

56

Castle Point

61

Chelmsford

61

Colchester

58

Epping Forest

51

Harlow

45

Maldon

60

Rochford

62

Tendring

57

Uttlesford

61

Cheltenham

44

Cotswold

64

Forest of Dean

61

Gloucester

53

Stroud

59

Tewkesbury

67

Basingstoke and Deane

55

East Hampshire

62

Eastleigh

59

Fareham

62

Gosport

56

Hart

57

Havant

64

New Forest

59

Rushmoor

61

Test Valley

60

Winchester

56

Broxbourne

54

Dacorum

59

East Hertfordshire

56

Hertsmere

59

North Hertfordshire

57

St Albans

59

Stevenage

59

Three Rivers

58

Watford

47

Welwyn Hatfield

54

Ashford

59

Canterbury

51

Dartford

64

Dover

57

Gravesham

49

Maidstone

57

Sevenoaks

58

Shepway

57

Swale

57

Thanet

45

Tonbridge and Malling

61

Tunbridge Wells

55

Burnley

49

Chorley

65

Fylde

52

Hyndburn

52

Lancaster

49

Pendle

54

24 May 2011 : Column 620W

Preston

44

Ribble Valley

67

Rossendale

55

South Ribble

51

West Lancashire

59

Wyre

55

Blaby

59

Charnwood

53

Harborough

56

Hinckley and Bosworth

59

Melton

60

North West Leicestershire

55

Oadby and Wigston

56

Boston

56

East Lindsey

57

Lincoln

41

North Kesteven

60

South Holland

58

South Kesteven

51

West Lindsey

57

Breckland

58

Broadland

60

Great Yarmouth

56

King's Lynn and West Norfolk

59

North Norfolk

60

Norwich

38

South Norfolk

62

Corby

54

Daventry

56

East Northamptonshire

56

Kettering

45

Northampton

47

South Northamptonshire

65

Wellingborough

52

Alnwick

64

Berwick-upon-Tweed

61

Blyth Valley

61

Castle Morpeth

64

Tynedale

55

Wansbeck

52

Craven

57

Hambleton

64

Harrogate

56

Richmondshire

59

Ryedale

63

Scarborough

53

Selby

64

Ashfield

52

Bassetlaw

55

Broxtowe

55

Gedling

55

Mansfield

48

Newark and Sherwood

56

Rushcliffe

56

Cherwell

57

Oxford

43

South Oxfordshire

57

Vale of White Horse

57

West Oxfordshire

60

Bridgnorth

56

North Shropshire

56

Oswestry

51

24 May 2011 : Column 621W

Shrewsbury and Atcham

57

South Shropshire

62

Mendip

55

Sedgemoor

60

South Somerset

56

Taunton Deane

53

West Somerset

60

Cannock Chase

52

East Staffordshire

53

Lichfield

56

Newcastle-under-Lyme

52

South Staffordshire

60

Stafford

55

Staffordshire Moorlands

55

Tamworth

50

Babergh

54

Forest Heath

62

Ipswich

45

Mid Suffolk

65

St Edmundsbury

53

Suffolk Coastal

52

Waveney

52

Elmbridge

66

Epsom and Ewell

57

Guildford

50

Mole Valley

57

Reigate and Banstead

47

Runnymede

46

Spelthorne

53

Surrey Heath

63

Tandridge

56

Waverley

57

Woking

54

North Warwickshire

57

Nuneaton and Bedworth

56

Rugby

63

Stratford-on-Avon

61

Warwick

52

Adur

57

Arun

55

Chichester

59

Crawley

54

Horsham

62

Mid Sussex

57

Worthing

59

Kennet

57

North Wiltshire

60

Salisbury

59

West Wiltshire

63

Bromsgrove

57

Malvern Hills

57

Redditch

57

Worcester

59

Wychavon

66

Wyre Forest

55

Anglesey, Isle of

57

Gwynedd

51

Conwy

57

Denbighshire

53

Flintshire

59

Wrexham

52

Powys

57

Ceredigion

48

Pembrokeshire

55

24 May 2011 : Column 622W

Carmarthenshire

57

Swansea

47

Neath Port Talbot

50

Bridgend

53

Vale of Glamorgan, The

52

Rhondda, Cynon, Taff

50

Merthyr Tydfil

50

Caerphilly

51

Blaenau Gwent

51

Torfaen

52

Monmouthshire

60

Newport

54

Cardiff

44

Aberdeen City

50

Aberdeenshire

63

Angus

58

Argyll & Bute

59

Scot Borders, The

58

Clackmannanshire

54

West Dunbartonshire

49

Dumfries and Galloway

56

Dundee City

48

East Ayrshire

52

East Dunbartonshire

63

East Lothian

59

East Renfrewshire

63

Edinburgh, City of

43

Falkirk

56

Fife

57

Glasgow City

37

Highland

63

Inverclyde

50

Midlothian

58

Moray

58

North Ayrshire

52

North Lanarkshire

51

Orkney Islands

62

Perth and Kinross

62

Renfrewshire

53

Shetland Islands

61

South Ayrshire

57

South Lanarkshire

55

Stirling

56

West Lothian

55

Eilean Siar (Western Isles)

54

Northern Ireland

54

Total

52

Notes: 1. The sample size in the City of London is too small to calculate a meaningful percentage. 2. Data are not available by local authority in Northern Ireland. 3. The percentages include those who are married and separated from their partner. They exclude same sex couples who are in civil partnerships. 4. The Annual Population Survey is made up from the Labour Force Survey (LFS) plus various sample boosts. The APS is a household survey of people in the UK. It includes those resident at private addresses, but does not cover most communal establishments. Source: Annual Population Survey, ONS

Deputy Prime Minister

Political Party Funding

2. Lindsay Roy: To ask the Deputy Prime Minister when he expects to bring forward legislative proposals on the funding of political parties. [56960]

24 May 2011 : Column 623W

Mr Harper: The Government are committed to work to reform party funding. The Committee on Standards in Public Life is conducting a review and the Government will consider its recommendations, alongside other relevant evidence, before taking this forward.

Electoral Register

10. Mr Evennett: To ask the Deputy Prime Minister what plans he has to increase the completeness and accuracy of the electoral register. [56968]

Mr Harper: Maintaining a complete and accurate electoral register is the responsibility of electoral registration officers (EROs). More can be done to support completeness and accuracy. So we have announced plans to speed up the implementation of individual electoral registration in 2014, which will ensure that only those entitled to vote will get on the register. We are also trialling data matching, which will launch in June this year, to help identify people missing from the register. If successful, we will consider rolling this out across the country.

West Lothian Question

13. Stephen Phillips: To ask the Deputy Prime Minister what recent representations he has received on the West Lothian question. [56971]

Mr Harper: I refer the hon. Member to the answer the Deputy Prime Minister gave in response to the question by my hon. Friend the Member for Isle of Wight (Mr Turner), today.

Recall of Members of Parliament

14. Clive Efford: To ask the Deputy Prime Minister when he expects to publish his proposals for recall of hon. Members by their constituents. [56972]

Mr Harper: The Government are committed to bringing forward legislation to introduce a power to recall Members of Parliament where they have engaged in serious wrongdoing.

We are currently considering what would be the fairest, most appropriate and robust procedure and we will announce the details of our proposals before the summer recess.

Voting Rights: Prisoners

Priti Patel: To ask the Deputy Prime Minister what assessment he has made of press release 283(2011) issued by the Office of the Commissioner for Human Rights on the enfranchisement of prisoners; whether the Government was (a) consulted and (b) notified in advance of its publication; and what steps he plans to take in response to the comments made. [51636]

Mr Harper: The Office of the Commissioner for Human Rights provided an advance copy of the press release to the UK Delegation to the Council of Europe on 29 March 2011.

We are not responding directly to the press release. However, the Justice Secretary met the Commissioner for Human Rights, Mr Hammarberg, at the “High level Conference on the Future of the European Court of Human Rights” which took place in Izmir, Turkey on

24 May 2011 : Column 624W

26 and 27 April 2011. Throughout the Izmir conference, the Justice Secretary was clear that the Court must focus on truly important cases and have proper regard to the judgment of national parliaments and courts. This approach was endorsed at the conference, where the importance of the principle of subsidiarity was emphasised. An official record of the Izmir Declaration can be found here:

http://www.coe.int/t/dghl/standardsetting/conferenceizmir/default_en.asp

Education

Children in Care: Higher Education

Mr Timpson: To ask the Secretary of State for Education (1) whether he has had discussions with the Chancellor of the Exchequer on financial support for the continuation and extension of the Frank Buttle Trust quality mark for higher and further education institutions; [55761]

(2) whether his Department has plans to support the continuation and extension of the Frank Buttle Trust quality mark for higher and further education institutions. [55767]

Mr Hayes: I have been asked to reply.

The Department for Business, Innovation and Skills (BIS) does not provide direct funding to the Frank Buttle Trust to support the care quality mark in higher education institutions. Many universities, as autonomous institutions, choose to work with the Frank Buttle Trust to gain the care quality mark and they pay an annual fee direct to the Trust.

The (former) Learning and Skills Council had agreed to make a small contribution to the development project for England, which was exploring extending the quality mark to the further education sector. In recognition of the uncertainty caused by the transition from the Learning and Skills Council to the Skills Funding Agency and the Young People's Learning Agency, the Department also made a small contribution for the remainder of the development project. In return, the Trust was expected to work with the further education sector as it becomes more self-regulating; obtain support for the remainder of the project; and determine the viability of a sector-supported quality mark in the way described for higher education institutions.

The Department has not made any further commitment to financial support for the Frank Buttle Trust quality mark for further education institutions.

BIS reviewed awards in the further education system that were supported by public funds, but this quality mark was outside that review, given that no continued support or contribution is given by the Department.

Class Sizes: Middlesbrough

Tom Blenkinsop: To ask the Secretary of State for Education what the average number of pupils per class in (a) primary and (b) secondary schools in Middlesbrough South and East Cleveland constituency was (i) in each year from May 2005 to April 2010 and (ii) on the most recent date for which figures are available. [56722]

24 May 2011 : Column 625W

Mr Gibb: The information requested is shown in the table.

Information on class sizes is collected as part of the School Census in January each year. The classes are recorded as taught during a single selected period on the day of the census.

The latest available information is for January 2010 and can be accessed at:

http://www.education.gov.uk/rsgateway/DB/SFR/s000925/index.shtml

Data for 2011 at national and local authority level are due to be published on 22 June 2011 and will be available as part of the ‘Schools, Pupils and their Characteristics: January 2011’ Statistical First Release at:

http://www.education.gov.uk/rsgateway/DB/SFR/s001012/index.shtml

Maintained primary and state-funded secondary schools (1,2) : classes as taught (3; ) as at January each year, in Middlesbrough South and East Cleveland constituency
  Average class size

Primary (1) State-funded secondary (1,2)

2005

23.4

22.9

2006

23.8

22.3

2007

24.0

21.2

2008

24.0

21.2

2009

24.1

20.5

2010

24.0

20.1

(1) Includes middle schools as deemed. (2) Includes city technology colleges and academies. (3) One teacher classes as taught during a single selected period in each school on the day of the census in January. Source: School Census

Classroom Assistants

Nicky Morgan: To ask the Secretary of State for Education what recent assessment he has made of the use of higher level teaching assistants in schools; and what discussions he has had with Ofsted about the extent to which inspectors may take into account in assessments the use of higher level teaching assistants in schools. [56212]

Mr Gibb: The Department has made no recent assessment of the use of higher level teaching assistants in schools.

We are committed to refocusing school inspection on four core areas; pupil achievement; teaching; leadership and management; and behaviour and safety. The Department is in regular discussion with Ofsted about this reform programme. The use of higher level teaching assistants will be relevant to the quality and impact of teaching and leadership. There are no plans for this specific issue to be routinely covered as a discrete aspect of the inspection.

Departmental Official Engagements

Mrs Hodgson: To ask the Secretary of State for Education what the official engagements of the Minister of State for Children and Families were on 27 April 2011. [56614]

Sarah Teather: None.

24 May 2011 : Column 626W

Departmental Research

Chris Ruane: To ask the Secretary of State for Education which longitudinal studies monitoring the physical health and emotional well-being of children his Department has and its predecessors have undertaken in each of the last five years; when each such study commenced; what each was monitoring; what the budget of each was in each year; what plans there were for the future of each such study; and what their budgets have been to date. [56888]

Mr Gibb: In the last five years the Department for Education and its predecessors have invested in six longitudinal studies that collect information about children’s physical health and mental well-being. These are:

The Longitudinal Study of Young People in England

The Longitudinal Study of Young People in England is a study which followed an initial cohort of 15,500 young people. Interviews were conducted annually from 2004 (when the respondents were academic age 13) to 2010 (when they were aged 19). This study was designed to enhance understanding of the transitions made by young people from the latter part of compulsory education into early adulthood. It collected a wide range of information pertaining to those issues, including data on outcomes and achievements, education, employment and benefits, relationships and behaviours, volunteering and life satisfaction.

Questions about emotional well-being were asked when respondents were aged 14, 16 and 19. The questions were adapted from tried and tested questions from existing surveys and do not include objective measures of physical health. A single self-reported assessment of health was obtained when respondents were aged 15 and 16.

The total budget for the study was £10,858,992 (from DfE and Treasury sources, with contributions from Department for Business, Innovation and Skills and Department for Work and Pensions). The financial year breakdown was as follows:


Budget (£)

2003-04

394,777

2004-05

2,841,133

2005-06

1,979,289

2006-07

1,852,496

2007-08

1,569,700

2008-09

956,486

2009-10

771,105

2010-11

494,006

Total

10,858,992

DfE have no plans to conduct further interviews of this cohort and no decisions have been made to date about future cohort studies of young people.

The National Evaluation of Sure Start Impact Study

Development of the National Evaluation of Sure Start (NESS) Impact Study commenced in 2000 and fieldwork started in 2003. The objective of the study is to assess the effects of the earliest Sure Start Local Programmes on child development and family functioning. This is achieved by comparing the families interviewed in this study with a comparable set of families interviewed as part of the Millennium Cohort Study who have not experienced Sure Start Local Programmes.

24 May 2011 : Column 627W

The NESS Impact Study has followed an initial cohort of over 12,500 children and families living in the original Sure Start Local Programme areas. The children and families were interviewed about a range of physical health and well-being measures when the children were nine months, three years and five-years-old. The seven-year-old fieldwork is currently underway. It is not anticipated that the study will be extended beyond this sweep of fieldwork and will come to an end when the seven-year-old results have been reported.

Total funding from the Department to the end of 2010/11 was £14,080,996. The budget for each year was:


Budget (£)

2000-01

24,186

2001-02

1,008,671

2002-03

1,397,190

2003-04

1,486,919

2004-05

1,758,921

2005-06

1,338,137

2006-07

1,357,937

2007-08

1,423,200

2008-09

1,624,258

2009-10

1,250,577

2010-11

1,411,000

Total

14,080,996

The Millennium Cohort Study

The Millennium Cohort Study was commissioned by the Economic and Social Research Council (ESRC). Their funding has been supplemented by a consortium of Government Departments including DfE. The study is following 19,000 children born in the UK in 2000/01 and is tracking their overall development.

There have been two data collections within the last five years, when the children were aged five and seven. The MCS has explored some elements of health and emotional well-being in its wider coverage of family life, child care; child behaviour, school choice, cognitive development; parental employment, income and poverty; neighbourhood and residential mobility; and social capital. The next sweep of the study is planned for 2012 when the children will be 11-years-old. The Department has not yet decided whether to financially support the survey beyond this phase.

Funding from the Department to the end of 2010/11 has amounted to £1,914.103. The budget for each year was:


Budget (£)

2000-01

100,000

2002-03

200,000

2003-04

200,000

2005-06

361,334

2006-07

530,868

2007-08

4,234

2008-09

233,667

2009-10

239,000

2010-11

45,000

Total

1,914,103

24 May 2011 : Column 628W

The Effective Pre-school Primary and Secondary Education project

The Effective Pre-school Primary and Secondary Education project (EPPSE) started in 1997. It aimed to identify the impact of pre-school provision on a national sample of children between the ages of three and seven. Since then the Department has funded the research to follow the same sample of 3,000 children through primary school and into secondary school.

The study has investigated both attainment/cognitive and social/behavioural development. Emotional well-being is treated as a behavioural issue through such concepts as independence, self-regulation and pro-social behaviour. Physical health is not addressed other than as a background factor in a child’s early years. The focus of the study is on the influence of home, pre-school, primary and secondary school on attainment and behavioural development. The Department has not yet decided whether to fund the study beyond age 16.

Total funding from the Department to the end of 2010/11 was £6,822,956. The budget for each year was:


Budget (£)

Before 2003

1,756,795

2003-04

505,399

2004-05

587,068

2005-06

508,784

2006-07

547,216

2007-08

601,451

2008-09

706,421

2009-10

769,752

2010-11

840,070

Total

6,822,956

The Avon Longitudinal Study of Parents and Children

The Avon Longitudinal Study of Parents and Children (ALSPAC) is a sub-regional longitudinal study following 14,000 children since before they were born in1991/92. It is largely funded by the Medical Research Council with this Department and its predecessors contributing funding since 2006 to ensure data relevant to learning and schools were collected. The overall study is very wide ranging, with many health issues assessed as well as family and school experiences at school, perceived abilities in key subjects, self-confidence, transitions into work, adolescent behaviour and body image.

The Department’s contract with ALSPAC is almost complete and no decision has been made about further funding.

Total funding from the Department to the end of 2010/11 has been £722,171. The budget for each year was:


Budget (£)

2006-07

111,762

2007-08

230,749

2008-09

133,218

2009-10

202,804

2010-11

43,638

Total

722,171

24 May 2011 : Column 629W

Understanding Society

Understanding Society is commissioned and managed by the Economic and Social Research Council (ESRC). Their funding has been supplemented by contributions from a number of Government Departments, including DfE.

It is a large-scale household study which aims to track up to 100,000 individuals in 40,000 households across the UK. Each individual in sample households aged 10 years and above is included in the study. Those aged 10 to 15 years are given a separate questionnaire to complete. The study started in 2009 and the third wave of interviews started in early 2011.

The focus of the study is on the household and how each member relates to each other and the questions asked cover a wide spectrum of issues. Questions on emotional well-being and health and nutrition have been asked of respondents aged 10 to 15 in all three waves of interviews to date.

24 May 2011 : Column 630W

Total funding from the Department was £200,000 (paid in 2010/11). Further contributions are not anticipated.

Free School Meals

Damian Hinds: To ask the Secretary of State for Education what estimate he has made of the proportion of children who take up their entitlement to free school meals in each (a) ethnic and (b) religious group. [56508]

Mr Gibb: The information available on the number and percentage of pupils eligible for and claiming free school meals in each ethnic group is shown in the following table. The answer includes full and part-time pupils aged five to 15. Information is not available on the proportion of pupils who meet the eligibility criteria but do not make a claim.

Information on pupils' religious group is not collected by this Department.

Maintained primary, state-funded secondary and special schools (1,2,3) : Number and percentage of pupils eligible for and claiming free school meals by ethnic group (4,5) , January 2010—England
  Pupils aged 5 to 15
  Maintained primary schools (1) State-funded secondary schools (1,2) Special schools (3) Total (1,2,3)

Number of pupils eligible for and claiming free school meals (5) Percentage of pupils in each ethnic group eligible for and claiming free school meals (incidence) (6) Number of pupils eligible for and claiming free school meals (5) Percentage of pupils in each ethnic group eligible for and claiming free school meals (incidence) (6) Number of pupils eligible for and claiming free school meals (5) Percentage of pupils in each ethnic group eligible for and claiming free school meals (incidence) (6) Number of pupils eligible for and claiming free school meals (5) Percentage of pupils in each ethnic group eligible for and claiming free school meals (incidence) (6)

White

415,805

16.4

304,545

13.0

20,835

34.3

741,185

15.0

White British

389,190

16.3

285,665

12.0

20,030

34.4

694,885

14.9

Irish

1,925

18.6

1,815

16.4

80

36.3

3,620

17.8

Traveller of Irish heritage

1,755

60.1

670

61.7

45

65.7

2,470

60.6

Gypsy/Roma

2,670

36.4

1,440

40.3

95

54.2

4,205

38.0

Any other White background

20,265

15.6

15,155

15.6

580

29.1

36,000

15.7

   

0.0

 

0.0

 

0.0

 

0.0

Mixed

37,815

26.9

23,080

22.8

1,190

39.9

62,085

25.4

White and Black Caribbean

14,765

34.5

9,640

27.4

505

45.4

24,910

31.5

White and Black African

4,715

29.3

2,570

24.9

130

42.1

7,415

27.8

White and Asian

5,845

19.2

3,585

17.4

155

31.5

9,585

18.6

Any other Mixed background

12,490

24.5

7,285

20.9

400

37.4

20,175

23.2

   

0.0

 

0.0

 

0.0

 

0.0

Asian

62,905

20.2

52,780

24.1

1,785

32.1

117,470

21.9

Indian

7,130

8.7

6,855

10.5

210

18.9

14,190

9.6

Pakistani

32,175

24.5

25,295

29.9

1,000

35.4

58,470

26.7

Bangladeshi

17,440

32.3

15,140

41.8

375

46.7

32,950

36.2

Any other Asian background

6,165

14.0

5,495

16.4

205

24.5

11,860

15.2

   

0.0

 

0.0

 

0.0

 

0.0

Black

62,795

38.3

42,160

33.3

1,960

47.8

106,915

36.3

Black Caribbean

14,970

33.1

10,110

25.2

545

42.7

25,620

29.6

Black African

40,985

41.4

27,670

38.3

1,115

51.1

59,775

40.2

Any other Black background

6,840

35.1

4,380

31.2

300

46.5

11,520

33.7

   

0.0

 

0.0

 

0.0

 

0.0

24 May 2011 : Column 631W

24 May 2011 : Column 632W

Chinese

1,070

9.7

920

8.8

35

21.0

2,030

9.4

   

0.0

 

0.0

 

0.0

 

0.0

Any other ethnic group

14,465

30.9

10,880

32.4

325

44.1

25,670

31.6

   

0.0

 

0.0

 

0.0

 

0.0

Classified(4)

594,855

18.5

434,365

15.4

26,130

35.2

1,055,355

17.3

   

0.0

 

0.0

 

0.0

 

0.0

Unclassified(7)

4,055

18.9

6,240

17.5

305

34.9

10,595

18.3

   

0.0

 

0.0

 

0.0

 

0.0

Minority ethnic pupils(8)

205,670

25.0

148,700

24.7

6,100

38.1

360,470

25.0

   

0.0

 

0.0

 

0.0

 

0.0

All pupils(9)

598,915

18.5

440,605

15.4

26,435

35.2

1,065,950

17.3

(1) Includes middle schools as deemed. (2) Includes city technology colleges and academies. (3) Includes maintained and non-maintained special schools. Excludes general hospital schools. (4) Pupils of compulsory school age and above were classified according to ethnic group. Excludes dually registered pupils. (5) Includes full and part-time pupils aged five to 15. (6) The number of pupils eligible for and claiming free school meals expressed as a percentage of all pupils in each ethnic group, for each school type. (7) Information refused or not obtained. (8) Includes all pupils classified as belonging to an ethnic group other than White British. (9) All pupils aged five to 15. Note: Totals may not appear to equal the sum of the component parts because numbers have been rounded to the nearest five. Source: School Census

Free School Meals: Cheshire

Graham Evans: To ask the Secretary of State for Education how many and what proportion of children are entitled to free school meals in (a) primary and (b) secondary schools in (i) Chester West and Cheshire Unitary Authority area and (ii) Halton Borough Council area. [56810]

Mr Gibb: The information available, on pupils known to be eligible for and claiming free school meals, is shown in the following table. The answer includes full-time pupils aged 0 to 15 and part-time pupils aged five to 15.

Maintained primary and state-funded secondary schools (1,2) : free school meal eligibility (3,4) , as at January 2010, in Cheshire West and Chester and Halton local authorities
  Primary schools (1) State-funded secondary schools (1,2)

Number on roll (3,4) Number of pupils known to be eligible for and claiming free school meals (3,4) Percentage known to be eligible for and claiming free school meals (3,4) Number on roll (3,4) Number of pupils known to be eligible for and claiming free school meals (3,4) Percentage known to be eligible for and claiming free school meals (3,4)

Cheshire West and Chester

23,975

3,550

14.8

18,838

2,300

12.2

Halton

9,673

3,050

31.5

7,190

1,873

26.1

(1) Includes middle schools as deemed. (2) Includes city technology colleges and academies. (3) Includes sole and dual (main) registrations. (4) Includes full-time pupils aged 0 to 15 and part-time pupils aged five to 15. Source: School Census

Information on school meal arrangements was published in the Statistical First Release ‘Schools, Pupils and their Characteristics: January 2010’ available on our Research and Statistics Gateway website at:

http://www.education.gov.uk/rsgateway/DB/SFR/s000925/index.shtml

GCE A-Level

Elizabeth Truss: To ask the Secretary of State for Education how many and what proportion of GCSE A-level students gained at least three GCSE A-levels at grade A or A* in (a) mathematics, (b) English literature, (c) further mathematics, (d) biological sciences, (e) physics, (f) chemistry, (g) geography, (h) history and (i) a modern foreign language in (i) comprehensive schools, (ii) selective schools, (iii) independent schools and (iv) sixth form colleges (A) nationally and (B) in each local education authority in the last year for which figures are available. [54699]

24 May 2011 : Column 633W

Mr Gibb [holding answer 9 May 2011]: The information requested has been placed in the House Libraries.

Greater Manchester

Mr Rob Wilson: To ask the Secretary of State for Education what payments his Department and its non-departmental public bodies have made to (a) the Manchester College, (b) Manchester College for Arts and Technology and (c) City College, Manchester since 1997; and for what purpose in each case. [55748]

Mr Gibb: The following payments by the Department for Education, the Young People's Learning Agency and their predecessors have been made to the Manchester College, Manchester College of Arts and Technology and City College, Manchester:

£
DFE and predecessor The Manchester College Manchester College of Art and Technology City College, Manchester

2004-05

0

12,450,051

2,547

2005-06

0

16,185,922

0

2006-07

0

5,087,364

0

2007-08

0

0

0

2008-09

0

0

0

2009-10

0

0

0

£
Young People's Learning Agency and predecessor The Manchester College Manchester College of Art and Technology City College, Manchester

2004-05

0

20,413,155

12,944,364

2005-06

0

20,004,537

19,928,142

2006-07

0

21,281,516

44,665,013

2007-08

0

23,939,267

63,872,196

2008-09

59,232,549

8,793,204

21,586,210

2009-10

111,644,176

0

0

The Department's and predecessors' funding related to course fees for various members of staff undertaking qualifications. The Young People's Learning Agency's and predecessors' funding was for 16-19 education (including European Social Fund monies and funding for Apprenticeships), learner support, capital and offender learning (which includes all offender learning funding—for 16 to 19-year-olds and adults).

In accordance with NAO and departmental policy, records relating to creditors and other financial transaction data are kept for a maximum of six years from the end of the financial year to which they relate and complete data prior to the 2004-05 financial year are no longer available.