Developing Countries: Marriage

Alex Cunningham: To ask the Secretary of State for International Development what steps his Department plans to take to meet its objective of (a) working towards changing social norms that constrain women's choice and control over resources and (b) helping young women resist early and forced marriage in developing countries. [66122]

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Mr Andrew Mitchell: The Department for International Development's (DFID) Strategic Vision for Girls and Women recognises that giving girls and women greater choice and control over decisions that affect them helps to break the cycle of poverty from one generation to the. next.

Through our country programmes in DRC and Nigeria, for example, DFID is supporting locally led action for social change, including: working with women's groups to challenge discrimination against girls and women; working with boys and men to re-dress unequal gender relationships; and supporting girls and women to participate in local and national decision making.

Investing in adolescent girls, including delaying the age of marriage and first pregnancy is at the heart of the Strategic Vision. DFID provides support to tackle early marriage in Bangladesh, Ethiopia, India, Kenya and Nigeria. In Ethiopia, our support will delay marriage for 220,000 girls in two specific locations, with the vision to expand to the entire Amhara region, which has the highest rate of child marriage in Sub-Saharan Africa.

Alex Cunningham: To ask the Secretary of State for International Development whether he plans to encourage countries in receipt of financial support from his Department to (a) set and enforce a minimum legal age of marriage and (b) reduce the proportion of women who marry before the age of 18 years. [66124]

Mr Andrew Mitchell: The Department for International Development (DFID) is committed to protecting and promoting human rights for all people, including children. In taking decisions on the provision of aid, DFID takes into consideration the country Government's commitment to human rights.

We work through our country programmes to support Governments to tackle early marriage. In Ethiopia, our support will delay marriage for 220,000 girls in two specific locations, with the vision to expand to the entire Amhara region, which has the highest rate of child marriage in Sub-Saharan Africa. We are also working with the Ministry of Women, Children and Youth Affairs in Ethiopia to develop the Government's capacity to implement national programmes to tackle early marriage.

Together with the FCO and Home Office Joint Forced Marriage Unit, we work with UN and EU partners, and bilaterally, to implement the UN convention on the rights of the child and its two optional protocols, and encourage countries to fulfill their obligations.

Monitoring: Deforestation Saatellite Communications

Adam Afriyie: To ask the Secretary of State for International Development what assessment he has made of the effectiveness of Earth observation satellite technology in monitoring global deforestation. [65813]

Mr Duncan: Satellite technology has important applications for monitoring global deforestation. The data generated from satellite images can have a powerful, positive impact on increasing transparency. The UK is a member of the Group on Earth Observations (GEO) whose forest task group is working to support countries in establishing national forest-change monitoring systems.

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Technology alone cannot provide a solution to deforestation. It is equally important to work with developing countries to build government capacity to manage data, share data and apply analysis to planning decisions. Loss of forests often comes about as a result of poor governance, which results in illegal land clearance and illegal logging. To this end the UK Government are also working with a number of key forest nations to bring about improvements to forest governance.

Horn of Africa: Agriculture

Tony Baldry: To ask the Secretary of State for International Development whether he has considered the merits of measures to build long-term resilience into the national agricultural systems of the countries of the horn of Africa. [65887]

Mr Andrew Mitchell: DFID sees building long-term resilience into national agricultural systems as key in reducing the effects of potential food crisis in the horn and across the whole of Africa. It is for this reason the UK Government provided a £10 million grant to the African Union’s Comprehensive Africa Agriculture Development Programme (CAADP) to boost agricultural productivity and improve resilience to food insecurity in Africa. CAADP is working with the national agricultural systems in Ethiopia and Kenya, among other African countries, to define strategies for halving hunger and achieving increases of 6% in agricultural growth each year through policy reform and better investment. For example, latest figures we have from 2009 show that annual agricultural growth rates were 6% in Ethiopia and 3% in Kenya.

DFID also provides resilience through country-led programmes in Africa. In Ethiopia we support the Productive Safety Net Programme which provides cash and food transfers to around 8 million vulnerable people, while in Kenya we are supporting more than 60,000 of the most vulnerable households by providing regular cash payments through our Hunger Safety Net Programme.

Overseas Aid

Ms Angela Eagle: To ask the Secretary of State for International Development what the cost was of (a) the Department's aid reviews and (b) its operational plans. [65034]

Mr Andrew Mitchell: I refer the hon. Member to my answer of 31 January 2011, Official Report, column 613W, which outlines the reviews I launched last year.

The Government are determined to ensure that the aid budget is used effectively and delivers value for money for both the British tax payer and the world's poorest people. The Department for International Development's aid reviews will fundamentally change the way aid funds are spent in the future with a much clearer focus on results and value for money. After a comprehensive spending review, there is normally an allocation round, which in this case was replaced by a strategic review. This review is an essential part of Government business and an improvement on the previous arrangements.

(a) The Bilateral Aid Review is estimated to have cost £137,000. The Multilateral Aid Review is estimated to have cost £72,300; the Humanitarian Emergency Response

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Review is estimated to have cost £269,220. These costs include visits to countries to gather information about the effectiveness on the ground and consult with key partners, external support and peer reviews where appropriate, and production of the reports. All of these were an essential part of ensuring a rigorous process. Staff across DFID also provided inputs into all three reviews.

(b) There was no additional cost to the Department for its operational plans since these form part of the Department's normal business planning arrangements.

Overseas Aid: Schools

Chris Leslie: To ask the Secretary of State for International Development whether his review of awareness-raising programmes in the UK has resulted in changes to criteria for determining grants for work in schools; and if he will make a statement. [66466]

Mr Duncan: DFID runs one programme that provides grants for work in schools in the UK. This is the Global Schools Partnership programme which provides grants to help schools establish a partnership with a school in a developing country. The review of awareness raising programmes in the UK has not resulted in changes to the criteria for determining grants for work in schools under this scheme.

South Sudan: Politics and Government

Mr Laurence Robertson: To ask the Secretary of State for International Development what assistance his Department is giving to the Government of South Sudan to help it strengthen its functions; and if he will make a statement. [66458]

Mr Andrew Mitchell: The UK is committed to a long-term process of nation-building, to develop the core functions of a democratic and accountable state and to integrate South Sudan into the regional economy. We have a number of capacity-building and service delivery programmes which seek to support this, including assistance to central and state ministries, to the national and state legislative assemblies, for security sector reform, and for the establishment of a customs service.

Syria: Politics and Government

Lindsay Roy: To ask the Secretary of State for International Development what recent assessment he has made of the political situation in Syria; and if he will make a statement. [66460]

Mr Andrew Mitchell: I continue to be concerned about the grave situation in Syria which shows no sign of abating. Protests across the country are still being met by unacceptable violence from the regime. Violent repression will only further undermine the regime’s legitimacy and raise serious questions about whether it is committed to the reforms it has recently announced. No meaningful political dialogue can take place while there is a brutal military crackdown.

The UK has made clear that President Assad is losing legitimacy and must reform or step aside. The UK will continue to work with our international partners, including in the UN, to condemn the repression in Syria and call

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for the Syrian Government to meet their people’s legitimate demands. If the regime continues to choose the path of brutal repression, pressure from the international community will only increase.

Energy and Climate Change

Biofuels: Aviation

Oliver Heald: To ask the Secretary of State for Energy and Climate Change if he will assess the potential effects on carbon dioxide emissions of the commercial development and use of aircraft biofuels and biofuel jet fuel blends; and if he will make a statement. [64103]

Mrs Villiers: I have been asked to reply.

The Government believe that sustainable biofuels have a role to play in reducing CO2 emissions from transport, particularly in sectors such as aviation where there are limited alternatives to fossil fuel.

The Government are also working towards a co-ordinated, evidence-based bioenergy strategy, including an analysis of the best use of available biomass resources, and will soon be publishing an assessment of the costs and carbon reduction potential of biofuel use in aviation.

As part of our development of a Sustainable Policy Framework for UK Aviation, the Department for Transport published a scoping document on 30 March 2011 that frames the debate on the future direction of aviation policy and asks a series of questions, including on use of biofuels in aviation. The responses to the scoping document will help to inform the development of a draft Framework, which we intend to publish for full public consultation in March 2012.

Carbon Sequestration

Tom Blenkinsop: To ask the Secretary of State for Energy and Climate Change what recent assessment he has made of progress against the scheduled objectives of the carbon capture and storage projects. [66115]

Charles Hendry: Negotiations with the Scottish Power consortium on the UK's first carbon capture and storage project are ongoing, with the aim of reaching an agreement as soon as possible. Our objective remains that this first CCS demonstration project (“Demo 1”) is constructed by 2014-15 and operational as soon as possible thereafter. We also aim to launch a process by the end of the year to select further demonstration projects.

Conditions of Employment

Julian Smith: To ask the Secretary of State for Energy and Climate Change how many meetings officials in his Department have had with the Department for Business, Innovation and Skills on the Government's employment law review since May 2011. [67217]

Gregory Barker: The Department of Energy and Climate Change does not have responsibility for employment-related legislation. However, in common with Partners across Government, we have been consulted throughout on the proposals for the Employment Law Review.

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Departmental Lost Property

Mr MacNeil: To ask the Secretary of State for Energy and Climate Change what property has been (a) lost and (b) stolen from his Department in the last 12 months; and what the cost of replacement was. [66571]

Gregory Barker: The following departmental property has been lost or stolen between 12 July 2010 and 12 July 2011.

Item Lost Stolen

Wireless internet dongle

4

0

Blackberry

4

5

Laptop

2

5

Entrust Token

4

1

RSA token

14

7

     

Replacement costs

£5,300

£9,435

Departmental Procurement

Mr Denham: To ask the Secretary of State for Energy and Climate Change what the annual value is of his Department’s current contracts in each sector in which contracts are held. [66583]

Gregory Barker: DECC records payments by supplier, not by contract, and the amounts in the following table relate to payments through the accounts payable system and exclude any payments that may have been made to contracted suppliers using government procurement cards (GPC). It would incur disproportionate costs to analyse GPC payments to identify which ones relate to contract suppliers.

DECC’s 2010-11 spend is shown in the following table.

  Group spend (£ million)

Corporate Supports Shared Services

33.6

Energy and Climate Change International

0.9

Energy Markets and Infrastructure

42.5

National Climate Change and Consumer Support

12.1

Science and Innovation Group

1.3

Total

90.3

Redundancy

Mr Redwood: To ask the Secretary of State for Energy and Climate Change how much (a) his Department and (b) each non-departmental body for which he is responsible has spent on redundancies since May 2010. [66340]

Gregory Barker: The Department of Energy and Climate Change has not spent any money on redundancies since May 2010. The Department has responsibility for four non-departmental bodies, the:

Civil Nuclear Police Authority

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Coal Authority

Committee on Climate Change

Nuclear Decommissioning Authority

Of these:

The Coal Authority has spent £554,000 on redundancies to 30 June 2011.

The Nuclear Decommissioning Authority has spent £4,795,590 on redundancies as set out in the 2010-11 Annual Report and Accounts.

Regulation

Julian Smith: To ask the Secretary of State for Energy and Climate Change what process his Department follows for the production of regulatory guidance; and how many officials in his Department were involved in the production of such guidance on the last date for which figures are available. [67207]

Gregory Barker: Guidance documents are produced by DECC in order to help people to comply with the law. There is no formal process in place but officials aim to work collaboratively with industry stakeholders in the production of new regulatory guidance as and when it is required. The Department does not collect data on the number of officials involved in the production of guidance documents.

Electric Vehicles

Zac Goldsmith: To ask the Secretary of State for Energy and Climate Change what effects his proposals for electricity market reform will have on support for the use of electric and plug-in hybrid vehicles. [66436]

Charles Hendry: The electricity market reforms are focused on achieving the investment we need to deliver the secure, affordable and low-carbon electricity we need. EMR does not specifically focus on the uptake of electric vehicles. However, the reforms set out in the White Paper will ensure that the electricity generation is in place to support their use. It is anticipated that electrification of the heat, transport and other carbon intensive sectors may lead to a doubling of overall electricity demand by 2050.

In addition, as part of the White Paper, the Government are seeking views on how to ensure that non-generation technologies and approaches to providing capacity—which could include reducing demand at periods of system scarcity by charging electric vehicles when demand is low—could participate in a capacity mechanism on a fair and equal basis with electricity generation.

Zac Goldsmith: To ask the Secretary of State for Energy and Climate Change what recent discussions he has had with the Secretary of State for Transport on the functionality of smart metering to support smart charging of electric and plug-in hybrid vehicles. [66438]

Charles Hendry: My officials have held various discussions with the Office for Low Emission Vehicles (OLEV) and Department for Transport officials, in taking forward the Smart Metering Implementation programme, including on the development of smart metering functionality requirements. These discussions have informed the Government's Response to the

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consultation on our “Smart Metering Prospectus”, published on 30 March 2011. Officials will continue to liaise as work on the Smart Meters programme continues.

Electricity

Huw Irranca-Davies: To ask the Secretary of State for Energy and Climate Change what consideration his Department has given to the likely need to revise the assumptions made in its consideration of reform of the electricity market in the case that the electricity market reform policies are classified as levies and subject to the Control Framework for DECC levy-funded Spending. [64380]

Charles Hendry: As set out in the consultation document published in December 2010, cost-effectiveness is a key criterion in developing the electricity market reform proposals. This includes affordability for consumers and implications for the public finances if the proposals are classified by the Office for National Statistics as tax and spend and are therefore subject to the DECC control framework for levy-funded spending.

Huw Irranca-Davies: To ask the Secretary of State for Energy and Climate Change whether he has made an assessment of the (a) investment in the energy sector, (b) economic growth and (c) employment of his decision to conduct a review of electricity market reform. [65418]

Charles Hendry: The reforms put forward in the Electricity Market Reform White Paper will facilitate a green economy, with long-term economic and sustainable growth, and are complementary to policies such as Green Deal. The EMR White Paper and impact assessment provide more details to demonstrate how that the proposed policies will lead to more investment in the electricity generation sector, enabling investment in electricity generation and transmission of around £110 billion by 2020. EMR will lead to higher revenue certainty for low-carbon generators, hence enabling not only new sources of finance but also lower costs of financing.

These reforms and our commitments to achieve emissions reduction and meet our renewable energy targets provide a basis for business and economic development in these new sectors and the creation of green jobs. The EMR White Paper and impact assessment have not undertaken any detailed assessments on the effects on overall employment levels.

Electricity: Finance

Huw Irranca-Davies: To ask the Secretary of State for Energy and Climate Change (1) when he expects the next National Grid Electricity Transmission system operator incentives to be brought forward; [66669]

(2) what discussions he has held with Ofgem on forthcoming National Grid Electricity Transmission system operator incentives; [66670]

(3) whether he has discussed with industry representatives forthcoming National Grid Electricity Transmission system operator incentives; [66671]

(4) what assessment he has made of the effectiveness of the current National Grid Electricity Transmission system operator incentives; [66672]

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(5) whether his Department plans to make a submission to Ofgem on forthcoming National Grid Electricity Transmission system operator incentives. [66673]

Charles Hendry: The Electricity Transmission System Operator Incentive Scheme is a matter for the independent energy regulator, Ofgem, in its role of regulating the monopoly companies which run the gas and electricity networks. The consultation on proposed changes to the incentive scheme closed on 8 July. Ofgem is currently in the process of finalising its position, which it will publish soon. While this is an important issue, it is one suited to the regulator to deal with due to its technical nature, concerning the detail of economic regulation. Therefore, while the Department is tracking developments, it is not actively involved in the details of the process.

Energy

Huw Irranca-Davies: To ask the Secretary of State for Energy and Climate Change whether he has made an assessment of the proportion of UK energy supply that will come from (a) renewable energy, (b) fossil fuel-based energy and (c) nuclear energy in 2020. [65454]

Charles Hendry: The proportion of UK energy supply that will come from different types of energy would depend on a number of variables including fossil fuel prices, technology costs and the carbon price. Different assumptions on those variables will lead to different energy mixes. The central scenario published in DECC's latest Energy and Emission projections using DECC central fossil fuel projections, carbon values and assumptions on technology costs is summarised in the following table:

Primary energy demand, central projection 2020 (percentage)

Renewables and waste

13.6

Nuclear

2.9

Fossil fuels

83.1

Imported electricity

0.4

Source: Annex H, DECC Updated Energy and Emissions Projections, June 2010

This covers all use of energy products within the UK, including those used for heat, transport, electricity generation and non-energy uses. The figures are consistent with the UK's renewable energy target.

In terms of fuels used for electricity generation, the central scenario using the same assumptions on fossil fuel prices, technology costs and carbon price for 2020 is:

All generators, central projection 2020 (percentage)

Renewables and waste

30.5

Nuclear

6.7

Fossil fuels

56.7

Other

6.1

Source: Annex E, DECC Updated Energy and Emissions Projections, June 2010

This includes autogenerators and combined heat and power. The category ‘other' includes imports and storage.

The full results of the projections and assumptions are described in the “Updated Energy and Emissions Projections” document

http://www.decc.gov.uk/en/content/cms/about/ec_social_res/analytic_projs/en_emis_projs/en_emis_projs.aspx

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DECC will publish new energy and emission projections later this year.

Energy: Local Government

Tony Cunningham: To ask the Secretary of State for Energy and Climate Change which local planning authorities returned the questionnaires referred to in section 5.4 of the Parsons Brinckerhoff report Update of UK Shadow Flicker Evidence Base, published for his Department on 16 March 2011. [66397]

Gregory Barker: Responses were received from the following local planning authorities:

1. South Gloucestershire council

2. Gloucester city council

3. Tendring district council

4. Barnsley metropolitan council

5. Lancaster city council

6. Rossendale borough council

7. Uttlesford district council

8. Charnwood borough council

9. Sheffield city council

10. Warrington borough council

11. Northern Ireland Planning Service

12. City and County of Swansea

13. Orkney Islands council

14. Perth and Kinross council

15. Inverclyde council

16. The Highland council

17. North Lanarkshire council.

Fossil Fuelled Power Stations

Lindsay Roy: To ask the Secretary of State for Energy and Climate Change what estimate he has made of the contribution of oil and gas-fired power stations to overall energy supply. [66690]

Charles Hendry: The contribution of oil and gas fired power stations cannot be measured in terms of overall energy supply, because this is measured in terms of primary fuel, whereas electricity generated from oil and gas is a secondary fuel.

Of overall electricity generation, provisional 2010 data show oil-fired generation contributed 0.9% and gas-fired generation contributed 46%. Final figures for 2010 will be published on 28 July 2011.

Data from table ET 5.1, available at:

http://www.decc.gov.uk/en/content/cms/statistics/energy_stats/source/electricity/electricity.aspx

Fuel Poverty: Rural Areas

Simon Hart: To ask the Secretary of State for Energy and Climate Change what discussions his Department has had with Age Concern on fuel poverty in rural households. [66083]

Gregory Barker: The Department has regular engagement with Age UK on a variety of issues, including fuel poverty. The Department also discusses fuel poverty issues with Age UK at meetings of the Government's Fuel Poverty Advisory Group.

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Fuels: Prices

Robert Halfon: To ask the Secretary of State for Energy and Climate Change what recent representations his Department has received on the cost to businesses of petrol and diesel. [66737]

Charles Hendry: I have received a number of representations on the cost of petrol and diesel.

The Government are aware of the significant impacts high oil prices are having on consumers, which is why the Chancellor announced a £1.9 billion package in the Budget to ease the burden on motorists.

Green Deal Scheme

Alison Seabeck: To ask the Secretary of State for Energy and Climate Change what his policy is on ensuring that a 30-day payment guarantee applies to all suppliers in the Green Deal process; and if he will make a statement. [67660]

Gregory Barker: The Code of Practice for the Green Deal will require participants to comply with the provisions of the Prompt Payment Code administered by the Institute of Credit Management on behalf of BIS. We are also considering whether the introduction of a cashless supplier payment system might bring even speedier payments, as well as a number of other benefits.

Both of these options will be set out in the consultation on the Green Deal to be launched in the autumn.

Mr Hanson: To ask the Secretary of State for Energy and Climate Change for what reason small and medium sized enterprises already assessed to have met the required standards of workmanship for the Green Deal are required to join Green Deal provider pre-qualification schemes. [67770]

Gregory Barker: This is not the case. We have commissioned the British Standards Institute (BSI) to develop a Green Deal Installer Standard with industry by the end of this year. This will bring together the existing standards and develop new ones where necessary. We will then use the UK Accreditation Service (UKAS) to provide independent accreditation of the existing certification bodies to ensure they are meeting this standard. Once a certification body has been accredited, those installers certified by that body will automatically be deemed as meeting the new BSI standard and will be able to use the Green Deal quality mark and supply into the market.

Natural Gas: Reserves

Jonathan Edwards: To ask the Secretary of State for Energy and Climate Change what estimate he has made of the (a) gas and (b) shale gas reserves available in (i) Wales, (ii) each region of England, (iii) Scotland and (iv) Northern Ireland. [67120]

Charles Hendry: UK onshore proven conventional gas reserves, which are not broken down by region, are between 0.6-2.3 billion cubic metres (bcm).

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There are no proven shale gas reserves, because exploration for shale gas has only recently commenced in the UK and no commercial production has yet been demonstrated, so it is not currently possible to make an estimate of reserves.

In a study for DECC, the British Geological Survey (BGS) had estimated that there could be potentially around 150 bcm of onshore UK shale gas resource potential (i.e. gas volumes that might be found by future exploration drilling). The BGS study is available on DECC’s oil and gas website via the following link:

https://www.og.decc.gov.uk/upstream/licensing/shalegas.pdf

DECC does not assess oil and gas reserves for Northern Ireland—this falls under the responsibilities of the Northern Ireland Department of Enterprise, Trade and Investment.

North Sea Oil

Mr Jim Cunningham: To ask the Secretary of State for Energy and Climate Change what steps he is taking to reduce the amount of oil spillage by private sector drilling companies in the North sea. [66308]

Charles Hendry: The Department requires all offshore oil spills, irrespective of volume, to be reported. In accordance with DECC's investigation policy, all spills are investigated by inspectors from the Department's Offshore Inspectorate, and the relevant enforcement action pursued.

Following the Macondo incident, we have increased the numbers of offshore inspectors and doubled the number of inspections to drilling rigs to ensure compliance with the regulations. In addition, my inspectors are increasingly focusing on prevention to ensure that best practices are shared and applied throughout the industry.

Mr Jim Cunningham: To ask the Secretary of State for Energy and Climate Change whether his Department has a contingency plan in place in the event of a natural disaster in the North sea caused by oil spillage; and if he will make a statement. [66309]

Charles Hendry: As a party to the United Nations convention on the law of the sea, the United Kingdom has an obligation to protect and preserve the marine environment. The national contingency plan for marine pollution from shipping and offshore installations (NCP) is one of the measures the UK has taken to meet this obligation and the Department for Transport’s Maritime and Coastguard Agency (MCA) is the custodian of this plan. The NCP’s purpose is to ensure there is a timely and measured response to an oil pollution incident.

The operators of offshore installations bear the primary responsibility for ensuring that they do not pollute the sea. However, offshore installations may face problems that exceed the response capabilities that they can reasonably maintain. Therefore, the MCA may need to use national assets in the response to a marine pollution incident. The NCP sets out the circumstances in which MCA deploys the UK’s national assets to respond to a marine pollution incident to protect the overriding public interest. It also describes how MCA manages these resources.

As detailed above, operators of an offshore installation or oil handling facility are primarily responsible for ensuring that they do not pollute the sea. All such operators must have an oil pollution emergency plan in

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place. These plans set out the arrangements for responding to incidents with the potential to cause marine pollution by oil. The plans, which are site specific, are reviewed by DECC, MCA and relevant environmental consultees before approval by DECC. The NCP supports and underpins an operator’s individual oil pollution emergency plan.

Mr Jim Cunningham: To ask the Secretary of State for Energy and Climate Change if he will assess the effects of oil spillages by private sector drilling companies in the North sea on potential for oil exploration in the Arctic; and if he will make a statement. [66310]

Charles Hendry: The UK has no regulatory jurisdiction in any part of Arctic waters. Decisions on licensing and exploration activities in Arctic waters are the responsibility of the relevant governments.

That is not to say that the UK has no interest in what happens within the Arctic Circle. We are observers in the Arctic Council which has recently set up a taskforce to look at a binding agreement on oil pollution preparedness and response and we have indicated a willingness to contribute to the work of that group.

Renewable Energy

Lindsay Roy: To ask the Secretary of State for Energy and Climate Change what estimate he has made of the contribution of (a) wind, (b) hydro-electric and (c) nuclear power to overall energy supply. [66691]

Charles Hendry: The following table shows the provisional percentage contribution of wind, hydro-electric and nuclear power to overall primary energy supply, as well as electricity generation, in 2010. Final figures for 2010 will be published on 28 July 2011.

  Percentage of primary energy supply Percentage of electricity generation

Wind

0.4

2.7

Nuclear

6.1

16.3

Hydro-electric

0.1

0.9

Data from tables ET 1.3 and ET 5.1, available at:

http://www.decc.gov.uk/en/content/cms/statistics/energy_stats/source/total/total.aspx

http://www.decc.gov.uk/en/content/cms/statistics/energy_stats/source/electricity/electricity.aspx

Renewable Energy: Feed-in Tariffs

David Morris: To ask the Secretary of State for Energy and Climate Change whether energy providers may limit the amount of electricity households may sell back to the National Grid. [67116]

Gregory Barker: The feed-in tariffs (FITs) scheme places obligations on electricity suppliers to make payments to households and others for every kilowatt hour of electricity generated by eligible small scale low carbon energy sources (the generation tariff), and to purchase energy exported to the wider energy market (the export tariff).

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For smaller installations with a capacity of 30 kilowatts or less, such as those that might be installed on a domestic property, the FITs scheme provides for the proportion of electricity exported in any given period to be estimated at a level determined by the Secretary of State. With the exception of micro-hydro installations, this is currently set as 50% of the total electricity generated. This deeming of exports allows for the level of payment for exported energy to be determined without the requirement of additional metering. These arrangements do not apply if an export meter already exists or is provided at the generator's expense.

The first comprehensive review of the FITs scheme is currently under way and provides an opportunity to consider the approach to metering in relation to payment of the FITs export tariff, including the approach to deeming. The Government recently concluded a call for evidence on the review's scope and we are intending to consult on more detailed proposals later in the year.

Julian Smith: To ask the Secretary of State for Energy and Climate Change what recent discussions he has had on the future level of payments from feed-in tariffs. [67278]

Gregory Barker: On 7 February 2011, the Secretary of State announced the start of the first comprehensive review of feed-in tariffs (FITs). This review is now underway and is considering all aspects of the FITs scheme, including tariff levels. We recently concluded a call for evidence on the review's scope and are intending to consult on more detailed proposals later in the summer. As part of the review process, Ministers and officials have had regular discussions with a range of interested parties.

Rural Areas

Julian Smith: To ask the Secretary of State for Energy and Climate Change whether officials of his Department have had recent discussions with the Rural Communities Policy Unit in the Department for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs. [67148]

Gregory Barker: Officials in the Department of Energy and Climate Change have a range of meetings with other Government Departments in the normal course of their work, including with the Department for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs.

Solar Power

Tom Blenkinsop: To ask the Secretary of State for Energy and Climate Change what steps he has taken to assist (a) community projects and (b) small businesses with the cost of solar photovoltaic installations. [67657]

Gregory Barker: The feed-in tariffs (FITs) scheme provides support to non-energy professionals, including communities and small businesses, to incentivise the uptake of small-scale, low carbon electricity generation, such as solar photovoltaics (PV).

As part of the Microgeneration Strategy, DECC promised advice by September 2011 for communities on buying groups. This will enable communities to get better value for money on a range of energy products including solar PV. This information will be published

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on Community Energy Online, a web portal developed by DECC for disseminating information to communities about renewable energy.

Utilities: Fees and Charges

Chris Ruane: To ask the Secretary of State for Energy and Climate Change what steps his Department is taking to simplify comparisons between the charges of utility companies for (a) product and (b) installation costs. [66395]

Charles Hendry: Ofgem is responsible for regulating gas and electricity supply. As part of its recent review into the effectiveness of the retail market, Ofgem proposes to clarify and simplify tariffs to help consumers find the best deal for them. Details of the review findings and proposals can be found online at:

http://www.ofgem.gov.uk/Markets/RetMkts/rmr/Documents1/RMR_FINAL.pdf

Network operators are required to publish their charges and terms and conditions for connection on their website. Details can be found at:

http://www.ofgem.gov.uk/Consumers/ncamm/Documents1/Howdoigetconnectedtoanelectricitysupply.pdf

Wind Power

Dr Poulter: To ask the Secretary of State for Energy and Climate Change what steps his Department is taking to ensure sufficient stability in the market to facilitate private sector investment in offshore wind. [65829]

Charles Hendry: On 12 July the Department published its White Paper on electricity market reform, setting out an enduring framework for future investment in low carbon generation including offshore wind. Feed-in tariffs with Contracts for Difference will provide the necessary support and stable revenues to incentivise investment in low carbon electricity generation at least cost to the consumer.

We have also set out robust transitional arrangements for renewables so as to maintain stable conditions for renewables investments and to maintain industry confidence while the new market arrangements are implemented. These reforms, alongside the Renewables Roadmap (also published on 12 of July), fully demonstrate our continued commitment to renewable electricity generation.

Dr Poulter: To ask the Secretary of State for Energy and Climate Change what steps his Department is taking to invest in skills and technology in offshore wind energy. [65831]

Charles Hendry: The information requested is as follows:

Technology

Under the DECC administered Environmental Transformation Fund Offshore Wind Demonstration scheme, £27,806,984 of capital grant support was awarded under three separate calls during 2009 and 2010 to 13 companies for 16 offshore wind technology development projects. This scheme was specifically aimed at bringing forward the demonstration of new components or technology to support the earlier deployment of large-scale multi-megawatt wind turbines.

18 July 2011 : Column 688W

The Carbon Trust, which receives funding from DECC, has so far provided £3.7 million in funding for offshore wind technology innovation through the Offshore Wind Accelerator (OWA), a collaborative research and development programme with eight energy companies which aims to reduce the cost of energy from offshore wind by 10% by 2020. DECC has committed in the region of £4.0 million to OWA in FY11-12; the eight industry partners have invested £5.9 million to date in OWA.

On 12 July 2011, the Government and devolved Administrations published the Renewable Energy Roadmap. The roadmap sets out a comprehensive programme of targeted, practical actions to tackle the barriers to renewables deployment, enabling the level of renewable energy consumed in the UK to grow in line with our ambitions for 2020 and beyond.

As announced in the roadmap, we are determined to drive down the costs of offshore wind and are establishing an industry taskforce to set out a path and action plan to reduce the costs of offshore wind, from development, construction and operations to £100/MWh by 2020. This will be supported by up to £30 million over the next four years for offshore wind innovation which, subject to satisfactory value for money assessments, will be used to fund schemes to drive cost reductions in components and technologies for offshore wind systems.

Skills

We are working with Sector Skills Councils and other partners to improve information about and strengthen the response to the wide range of skills needed to maximise the potential of the green economy, including those for offshore wind energy.

Wind Power: Crown Estate Commissioners

Huw Irranca-Davies: To ask the Secretary of State for Energy and Climate Change what the monetary value is of energy produced from offshore wind farms on the Crown Estate; and what the expected income from offshore wind farms on the Crown Estate is for the next 10 years. [65407]

Justine Greening: I have been asked to reply.

No estimate is available for the current value of the energy generated in offshore wind farms on Crown Estate property.

Estimates of future revenue are very uncertain because of a number of factors which cannot readily be forecast. Using DECC assumptions of July 2009, the Crown Estate's illustrative projections are that by 2020 its rental income from all renewable offshore activity could lie in the wide range £60 million to £200 million. The eventual amounts will be payable to the Exchequer, net of Crown Estate costs. No more recent assessments are available.

Wind Power: Nature Conservation

Simon Hart: To ask the Secretary of State for Energy and Climate Change what assessment his Department has made of the impact of wind farm developments on (a) birds and (b) other wildlife. [66279]

18 July 2011 : Column 689W

Charles Hendry: Each wind farm developer is required to complete an Environmental Impact Assessment (EIA) as part of its planning consent application. This covers issues such as impacts on birds and wildlife and, for offshore wind, fish and marine mammals.

For offshore wind, DECC undertakes a rolling programme of Offshore Energy Strategic Environmental Assessments (SEAs) and has an ongoing programme of research to back up the conclusions. These include projects to assess the impact of wind farm developments on birds and wildlife. DECC consulted on the latest SEA Environmental Report(1) earlier this year. This concluded that at a strategic level, there were no overriding environmental considerations to prevent the achievement of up to 33GW of offshore wind in the Renewable Energy Zone and English and Welsh territorial waters. A post-consultation report is due to be published shortly.

http://www.offshore-sea.org.uk/site/scripts/documents_info. php?categoryID=39&documentID=5

Transport

A537: Closures

Andrew Bingham: To ask the Secretary of State for Transport on how many occasions the A537 Cat and Fiddle Road between Buxton and Macclesfield has been closed in each of the last five years. [62420]

Norman Baker: This information is not held by the Department for Transport. The A53, A54 and A537 roads are the responsibility of Cheshire East council and Derbyshire county council as the relevant highway authorities. The closure of the roads and the collation of any statistics relating to those road closures is a matter for them.

Air Traffic Control: Swanwick

Mr Weir: To ask the Secretary of State for Transport what the monetary value in real terms was of the (a) original estimate and (b) final cost to the public purse of the air traffic control centre at Swanwick; and what additional costs, in real terms, have been incurred since its completion. [65639]

Mrs Villiers: I refer the hon. Gentleman to page 11 of the National Audit Office's 2002 report “The Public Private Partnership for National Air Traffic Services Ltd”, published on 24 July 2002. This report was made available in the Library of the House when it was published. This is also available online at:

http://www.nao.org.uk/publications/0102/the_ppp_national_air_traffic.aspx

Air Travel Trust Fund

Mr Weir: To ask the Secretary of State for Transport what assessment he has made of the adequacy of sanctions which can be applied to holders of air transport organisers' licences which cease to trade having breached the terms of the relevant licence. [65643]

Mrs Villiers: The Civil Aviation Authority (CAA) can prosecute businesses for certain breaches of The Civil Aviation (Air Travel Organisers' Licensing) Regulations

18 July 2011 : Column 690W

1995, as amended, including contravening the terms of an ATOL licence. Depending on the offence, on conviction this can lead to either (i) a fine of up to £3,000 or (ii) a fine of up to £5,000 or two years imprisonment, or both.

The CAA can also withdraw or refuse to grant or renew an ATOL licence if it is not satisfied that a business is fit to hold one or if it is not satisfied with the financial resources the business has available.

The consultation on ATOL reform published on 23 June 2011 seeks views on potential changes to the offences and sanctions for breach of the regulations.

Aviation: Night flying

Zac Goldsmith: To ask the Secretary of State for Transport, pursuant to the written ministerial statement of 5 July 2011, Official Report, columns 87-88WS, on airport co-ordination (London Olympics), what estimate he has made of the potential change in the number of night flights at Heathrow between 21 July and 15 August 2012. [65890]

Mrs Villiers: It is not currently anticipated that there will be any change in the existing night movements limits for Heathrow airport during the summer 2012 season.

Aviation: Biofuels

Oliver Heald: To ask the Secretary of State for Transport (1) if he will assess the potential effects on (a) air transport and (b) airport capacity of the commercial development and use of aircraft biofuels and biofuel jet fuel blends; and if he will make a statement; [64102]

(2) whether his Department was represented at the Paris Air Show; what assessment he made of the biofuel and biofuel jet fuel blend aircraft at the show; and if he will make a statement. [64104]

Mrs Villiers: The Government believe that sustainable biofuels have a role to play in reducing CO2 emissions from transport, particularly in sectors, such as aviation, where there are limited alternatives to fossil fuel. The Department is working with our European partners, the wider international community and industry to explore how to bring about a significant increase in the use of sustainable biofuels in aviation, but was not directly represented at the recent Paris Air Show.

As part of our development of a sustainable policy framework for UK aviation, the Department for Transport published a scoping document on 30 March 2011 that frames the debate on the future direction of aviation policy and asks a series of questions, including on use of biofuels in aviation. The responses to the scoping document will help to inform the development of a draft framework, which we intend to publish for full public consultation in March 2012.

Aviation: Primates

Mark Pritchard: To ask the Secretary of State for Transport how many primates were (a) killed and (b) injured while transiting (i) through UK airports and (ii) on UK registered airline carriers in the latest period for which figures are available. [66276]

18 July 2011 : Column 691W

Mrs Villiers: The Department does not hold statistics on the transport of primates through UK airports or on UK-registered airline carriers.

Aviation: Security

Shabana Mahmood: To ask the Secretary of State for Transport what discussions he has had with (a) his EU counterparts and (b) the European Commission on the trialling of the searching of religious headgear at UK airports. [65843]

Mrs Villiers: I have not had any direct discussions with EU counterparts and the European Commission on the trialling of the searching of religious headgear.

However, I have written to EU counterparts and the European Commission setting out the cultural sensitivities of the screening of religious headgear and outlining the UK approach.

Shabana Mahmood: To ask the Secretary of State for Transport what representations he has received from representatives of the Sikh community on the screening of religious headgear at airports. [65844]

Mrs Villiers: The Department for Transport has received a number of representations from individuals and Sikh community representatives. Several meetings with officials have taken place, which have resulted in the current ongoing trial of alternative screening arrangements.

I have met various colleagues and discussed this with them. The issue has also been the subject of a Westminster Hall debate. Most recently, I met with Sikh community representatives on this issue on 12 July.

Mr Scott: To ask the Secretary of State for Transport what recent discussions his Department has had with airport operators on increasing the speed of security checks of passengers. [67311]

Mrs Villiers: Officials from the Department meet regularly with airport operators to discuss various issues, including the screening processes for passengers.

The safety and security of the travelling public remains paramount in the design and implementation of airport security checks. We recently published proposals to improve the way aviation security in the UK is regulated, to encourage operators to deliver security in more passenger- friendly ways.

Barnt Green to Bromsgrove Railway Line: Electrification

Maria Eagle: To ask the Secretary of State for Transport when he expects to announce a decision on the proposed electrification of the Barnt Green to Bromsgrove line. [67751]

Mr Philip Hammond: Electrification between Barnt Green and Bromsgrove was included in the overall programme of rail investment I confirmed in my statement to Parliament on 25 November 2010. The package of works will be complimented by a larger and better equipped replacement station for the growing number of passengers in the area.

18 July 2011 : Column 692W

Bombardier: Derby

Pauline Latham: To ask the Secretary of State for Transport (1) whether he took into account the effects on Bombardier's future in Derby when deciding where to place the contract for trains; [64633]

(2) whether he took into account the effects on employees of Bombardier in Derby of his decision to place the contract for trains with Siemens; and whether he has made an estimate of the cost to the public purse of managing these effects. [64634]

Mrs Villiers: I refer my hon. Friend to the answer given to the right hon. Member for Southampton, Itchen (Mr Denham) today (UIN 63731).

Bus Services

Mr Bone: To ask the Secretary of State for Transport what assessment he has made of changes in the level of bus services funded by his Department in (a) England and (b) Northamptonshire in the latest period for which figures are available. [61647]

Norman Baker: The latest information on bus statistics in Great Britain can be found on the Department’s website at the following address:

http://www2.dft.gov.uk/pgr/statistics/datatablespublications/public/bus/index.html

The charts found at the following addresses may be of particular interest:

http://assets.dft.gov.uk/statistics/worksheets/bus0103.xls

http://assets.dft.gov.uk/statistics/worksheets/bus0109.xls

Bus Services: Concessions

Richard Fuller: To ask the Secretary of State for Transport if he will take steps to ensure that bus passes issued to senior citizens in (a) England are valid for travel in Wales and (b) Wales are valid for travel in England. [65168]

Norman Baker: There are no immediate plans to introduce mutual recognition of concessionary bus passes across the UK. Concessionary travel is a devolved policy area so the arrangements differ between England, Scotland, Wales and Northern Ireland. The Concessionary Bus Travel Act 2007 contains a power to allow, through future regulations, for mutual recognition of bus passes across the UK. Regular discussions have taken place at official level with the devolved Administrations. However, various technical and resource issues would need to be resolved before mutual recognition could be pursued. Individual local authorities on the England-Wales border are free to introduce arrangements between them to enable concessionary travel across the border, and some indeed have.

Hugh Bayley: To ask the Secretary of State for Transport how many pensioners in (a) York Central constituency, (b) the city of York, (c) north Yorkshire and (d) England (i) held a concessionary bus pass and (ii) were eligible for concessionary bus travel (A) in May 2010 and (B) at the latest date for which figures are available. [65617]

18 July 2011 : Column 693W

Norman Baker: The Department is not responsible for issuing bus passes and so does not maintain records of how many passes are held by concessionaires in individual local authority areas. As bus passes are issued by local authorities, the Department has no information regarding bus passes held in parliamentary constituencies.

Population estimates from the Office for National Statistics show that in mid-2010, the latest period for which figures are available, there were 44,900 older people resident in the city of York, 166,700 in north Yorkshire and 11,746,500 resident in England who were of the eligible age for a bus pass. The Department does not hold information as to whether all those eligible people have taken up their entitlement to the bus travel concession. However, the national travel survey 2009 estimated that 76% of eligible older people took up their entitlement to bus passes.

Capita

Tristram Hunt: To ask the Secretary of State for Transport how many contracts his Department has awarded to Capita since May 2010; and what the (a) monetary value and (b) net worth was of each contract. [62717]

Norman Baker: The Department for Transport and its agencies has awarded two contracts to Capita since May 2010. In addition, we have awarded a further two framework contracts which have a nil commitment value on expenditure. We have awarded 11 purchase orders from these and other pre-existing framework contracts. The individual monetary values of these contracts and purchase orders are shown in the following table.

Contract/type/purchase order Individual monetary value (£)

Contract

175,000

Contract

59,769

Framework Contract

0

Framework Contract

0

Purchase Order

150,000

Purchase Order

104,702

Purchase Order

19,080

Purchase Order

18,736

Purchase Order

32,244

Purchase Order

722,555

Purchase Order

97,543

Purchase Order

109,906

Purchase Order

240,917

Purchase Order

284,758

Purchase Order

18,021

Channel Tunnel Railway Line

Andrea Leadsom: To ask the Secretary of State for Transport which companies have been contracted to construct rolling stock operating on the High Speed 1 rail link. [62193]

Mrs Villiers [holding answer 27 June 2011]:There are currently two operators using High Speed 1.

Eurostar International, a stand alone business, currently operates 28 trainsets first introduced in 1994 and built by GEC-Alstom. Eurostar announced in October 2010 that it would be additionally purchasing 10 new trainsets from Siemens.

18 July 2011 : Column 694W

London and South Eastern Railway Company operates 29 x 6 car units, manufactured by Hitachi, on the HS1 domestic route, which were introduced in June 2009. In addition, Deutsche Bahn is looking at the commercial proposition to operate services on HS1 using Siemens manufactured trainsets.

Compensation

Richard Fuller: To ask the Secretary of State for Transport pursuant to the answer of 29 March 2011, Official Report, column 257W, on compensation, what steps he is taking to reduce the need for his Department's agencies and non-departmental public bodies to compensate the public for errors for which they were responsible. [63938]

Norman Baker: A number of approaches are being employed to reduce the incidence of official errors within the Department's agencies and non-departmental public bodies. Preventative measures, reviews and lessons learned differ across the Department, depending on the type of business transacted. They include the following measures:

Prevention

Customers are encouraged to obtain services online, reducing the risk that they do not receive the service they require.

Services are designed so as to minimise the scope for errors, by building transparency into the process.

Established quality management systems principles are used.

A risk-based approach to prevention is employed, appropriate to the level of errors compared with turnover.

Review and lessons learned

Complaints handling functions are being centralised in order to increase understanding of customer complaints and compensation requests, in order to identify areas that require process improvements.

Reviews are undertaken to ensure that lessons are learned and, where necessary, amended processes are communicated and shared to avoid a recurrence and the likelihood of compensation claims.

Best practice and lessons learned are widely disseminated, both locally and also between the agencies.

For unusual cases, legal or other advice is sought as appropriate.

Concessions: Pensioners

Hugh Bayley: To ask the Secretary of State for Transport how many (a) pensioners and (b) disabled people in (i) York, (ii) Yorkshire and the Humber and (iii) England received free bus travel and concessions in each year since 2008; and what plans he has for the future of free bus travel in England for older and disabled people. [66001]

Norman Baker: The Department does not maintain records of how many people received the free bus travel concession in individual local authority areas or the breakdown by older people and disabled people. A survey is in progress to collect information at local authority level.

Population estimates from the Office for National Statistics show the numbers of people of eligible age for a bus pass, from mid-year 2008 to mid-year 2010

Thousand

2008 2009 2010

City of York

43.4

44.1

44.9

Yorkshire and the Humber

1,149.4

1,169.8

1,189.0

England

11,324.2

11,541.1

11,746.5

18 July 2011 : Column 695W

The Department does not hold information on whether all those eligible people have taken up their entitlement to the bus travel concession. However, the national travel survey 2009 estimates that, nationally, 76% of eligible older people took up their entitlement to bus passes.

The right to free bus travel for both older and disabled people is enshrined in primary legislation and, in last year's spending review, the Chancellor of the Exchequer confirmed the Government's commitment to protect the free bus travel concession.

Congestion Review: Consultants

Ms Angela Eagle: To ask the Secretary of State for Transport (1) whether his Department engaged external consultants as part of the review into measures to reduce the congestion caused by incidents; and what each such consultant was paid; [65031]

(2) what the cost was of the review into measures to reduce the congestion caused by incidents. [65038]

Mike Penning: The review into congestion caused by motorway incidents was produced in-house by the Department with support from Highways Agency colleagues, and the published report was produced using the Department's in-house reprographics unit. Consequently, no consultancy or external publication expenditure was incurred.

Ms Angela Eagle: To ask the Secretary of State for Transport what the cost was of the development of the new strategic framework for road safety; whether any external consultants were used as part of this review; and how much was paid to each such consultant. [65033]

Mike Penning: The Department did not use any consultants in the development of the new strategic framework for road safety. The Transport Research Laboratory provided updated forecasts and analysis at a cost of £14,091.52. There was a consultation exercise with stakeholders in the form of a series of workshops that were hosted and run, on behalf of the Department, by the Parliamentary Advisory Council on Transport Safety. The total cost of these was £6,360.32, which included the production of several think pieces and summaries following the events. 100 hard copies of the document were printed in-house. Due to the nature of the contract it is not possible to quantify the cost of an individual print job, but this was the least cost approach. The rest of the development work was undertaken by permanent members of staff as part of their general road safety work. It is not possible to quantify this cost, but as an illustration there was approximately one full- time member of staff developing the document for nine months, with input from many others throughout the process.

Cycling

Tessa Munt: To ask the Secretary of State for Transport what plans he has to promote cycling to work; and if he will make a statement. [65733]

18 July 2011 : Column 696W

Norman Baker: The Department has traditionally promoted both the Cycle to Work Scheme and the Cycle to Work Guarantee to employers, employees and other Government Departments through a number of department-led promotions and projects. The Department also funds the national business travel network (NBTN). NBTN launched a DfT part-funded ‘ways2work’ tool kit in November 2010 to help people and businesses work more efficiently. The tool kit includes a section on encouraging cycling to work.

Most recently the Cycle to Work Scheme has been promoted through guidance to the members of the physical activity network, which is part of the Department for Health-led public health responsibility deal. I have also provided a foreword in support of the Cycle to Work Alliance's behavioural impact analysis.

Finally, the results of bids for tranche 1 of the local sustainable transport fund were released on 5 July 2011, many of which included elements relating to cycling to work.

Dartford-Thurrock Crossing Tolls

Gareth Johnson: To ask the Secretary of State for Transport whether the number plate recognition system proposed for the Dartford river crossing is the same as the system used for the London congestion charge; and whether the system will be able to identify vehicles with non-UK number plates. [67600]

Mike Penning: The proposals for an automatic number plate recognition (ANPR) system are currently being considered as part of the preliminary design stage for a free-flow charging scheme at Dartford Crossing. It is expected that such a system will be similar to that used for the London congestion charging scheme, and should be capable of capturing the vehicle registration mark of most foreign vehicles.

Departmental Billing

Mr Denham: To ask the Secretary of State for Transport how many invoices received by his Department have been paid (a) on time and (b) late in each month since May 2010; and what the monetary value is of the invoices paid late. [62489]

Norman Baker: The majority of the contractual obligations negotiated with suppliers within DFT is to pay valid invoices received from suppliers within 30 days of receipt.

The following table reflects the invoices received that were paid on time (within 30 days) and those that were paid late in each month since May 2010 for the DFT family (composed of the central Department and its seven executive agencies). The table includes the monetary value of invoices paid on time and paid late (over 30 days) for the same period.

18 July 2011 : Column 697W

18 July 2011 : Column 698W

DFT family
  Number of invoices Monetary value (£)

Paid in month Paid on time Not paid on time Paid on time Paid late

2010

         

May

18,294

18,198

96

335,590,702

4,808,015

June

19,517

19,417

100

387,768,206

9,923,662

July

18,989

18,891

97

327,029,601

9,402,201

August

15,693

15,617

78

345,047,722

3,810,952

September

17,075

17,000

72

305,054,805

9,855,466

October

17,022

16,926

98

359,648,551

4,302,872

November

16,703

16,660

43

314,083,194

373,153

December

15,280

15,249

31

324,952,106

12,021,550

           

2011

         

January

15,116

15,071

45

264,949,743

2,109,590

February

15,669

15,631

38

264,464,874

1,886,523

March

19,540

19,496

44

425,397,695

3,423,825

April

15,092

15,059

33

359,988,396

1,551,364

May

14,678

14,606

. 72

293,318,140

4,426,167

Total

218,668

217,821

847

4,307,293,735

67,895,340

As the majority of contractual obligations are to pay within 30 days, payments not made in five days are not late payments. The Department is committed to paying within five days where appropriate.

The following table reflects the invoices received that were paid within five days and those that were not paid within five days for the DFT family. It also includes the monetary value of invoices paid within five days and those paid outside of five days.

DFT family
  Number of invoices Monetary value (£)

Paid in month Paid in five days Not paid in five days Paid in five days Not p aid in five days

2010

         

May

18,294

14,284

4,010

241,643,071

99,175,486

June

19,517

15,140

4,329

233,148,106

164,903,807

July

18,989

15,957

3,050

248,809,491

86,996,013

August

15,693

14,209

1,518

298,361,910

52,091,691

September

17,075

15,825

1,250

281,772,641

32,280,964

October

17,022

15,863

1,176

337,152,736

26,798,687

November

16,703

15,748

955

282,743,742

31,712,605

December

15,280

14,064

1,216

295,036,104

41,937,552

           

2011

         

January

15,116

14,039

1,077

209,461,018

57,598,315

February

15,669

14,860

809

209,586,170

56,765,227

March

19,540

18,223

1,317

303,500,730

125,320,790

April

15,092

13,968

1,124

303,941,253

57,598,507

May

14,678

13,757

921

281,314,359

16,429,948

Total

218,668

195,937

22,752

3,526,471,331

849,609,592

Departmental Carbon Emissions

Huw Irranca-Davies: To ask the Secretary of State for Transport whether his Department has any plans to generate low-carbon energy from its estate. [63247]

Norman Baker: The Department for Transport is committed to reducing the carbon emissions from its estate and low-carbon technologies will form part of our overall sustainability strategy.

The Department already has four Vehicle Operator and Services Agency Test Station sites that utilise either Wind Turbine or Solar Photovoltaic technologies.

While these technologies are not practical for some parts of our estate, we have a number of feasibility studies ongoing at present. These include:

Biomass boiler, photovoltaic and solar thermal arrays at the Driving Standards Agency training and development centre in Bedford. The target for installation to start is 2012;

Installation of low-carbon technologies in at least one of the Highways Agency main offices with a target for installation to be take place by March 2012;

Ground and air source heat pumps and photovoltaic technologies at the Driver and Vehicle Licensing Agency headquarters in Swansea. The aim is for these to be progressed over the next two years, subject to feasibility; and

18 July 2011 : Column 699W

The Maritime and Coastguard Agency is in the infancy of exploring the potential for generating low-carbon energy from its estate but does not yet have any definitive time scales in place.

These are the current areas under consideration, but this scope is likely to grow as the technologies mature and our estate rationalisation programme completes.

Departmental Charitable Donations

Chris Ruane: To ask the Secretary of State for Transport what steps he is taking to encourage charitable giving by Ministers in his Department. [57126]

Norman Baker: Government Ministers have pledged to undertake a ‘one-day challenge’ with a charity or community group of their choice. This is a clear and public commitment by Ministers to give their time to help others. The pledge aims to inspire others to consider how they might be able to support their communities to benefit themselves, as well as their chosen organisations.

Business Regulation

Mr Umunna: To ask the Secretary of State for Transport how many regulations that impose costs on

18 July 2011 : Column 700W

businesses his Department

(a)

introduced and

(b)

removed in the six months prior to 1 September 2010; and what the net effect on the costs on businesses of such introductions and removals was. [65339]

Mike Penning: Twelve statutory instruments that impose costs on businesses, charities or the voluntary or public sectors were made by the Department for Transport in the six months prior to 1 September 2010. Eleven were made by the Department under the last Administration. Of the 12, six imposed an overall net cost. The other six were either neutral in terms of the overall costs imposed or had an overall net benefit.

Although it is not possible, except at disproportionate cost, to break down the costs as between business, charities and the voluntary or public sectors for each of the instruments, I set out as follows a table of the 12 instruments giving general comments on whom, on the basis of the impact assessments prepared for the instruments, the costs were expected to fall.

The Merchant Shipping (Ship-to-Ship Transfers) Regulations 2010 are not yet in force and the underlying policy is subject to review. Consequently, the costs in the table may not become a reality.

Title Number Net cost (£ million) Net benefit (£ million) Origin (wholly or mainly) Comment

Merchant Shipping (Light Dues) (Amendment) Regulations 2010

2010 No. 629

0

0

Domestic

Train Driving Licences and Certificates Regulations 2010

2010 No. 724

17.1

EU

Costs will mainly fall on the train operating companies

Merchant Shipping(Maritime Labour Convention) (Medical Certification) Regulations 2010

2010 No. 737

0.148

International

Costs to seafarers

Air Navigation (Amendment) Order 2010

2010 No. 770

5.848

Domestic

Costs to licensed aerodromes and the Civil Aviation Authority (CAA). Benefits to training organisations and CAA

M20 Motorway (Junctions 4 to 7) (Variable Speed Limits) Regulations 2010

2010 No. 775

7.3

Domestic

Costs mainly to government, benefit to motorists

Vehicle Drivers (Certificates of Professional Competence) (Amendment) Regulations 2010

2010 No. 865

0.121

Domestic

Costs to drivers

Merchant Shipping (Prevention of Air Pollution from Ships) (Amendment) Regulations 2010

2010 No. 895

23

EU

Most costs fall on passenger ship operators but some to the Maritime and Coastguard Agency

Motor Vehicles (Off Road Events) (Amendment) (England) Regulations 2010

2010 No. 1003

0

0

Domestic

Motor Vehicle(Competitions and Trials) (Amendment) (England) Regulations 2010

2010 No. 1005

0

0

Domestic

Motor Vehicles (Driving Licences) (Amendment) Regulations 2010

2010 No. 1203

0.009

Domestic

Cost to driver trainers

Merchant Shipping (Ship-to-Ship Transfers) Regulations 2010

2010 No. 1228

83.3

Domestic

Costs to ports, harbours and shipping operators.

Tonnage Tax (Training Requirement) (Amendment) Regulations 2010

2010 No. 2158

0

0

Domestic

18 July 2011 : Column 701W

In total, the 12 instruments have a net cost of £123.678 million and a net benefit of £13.148 million, giving an overall net cost of £110.15 million.

No statutory instruments which imposed a cost on business were revoked by an instrument made in the six months prior to 1 September 2010.

Local and temporary instruments have not been considered for the purposes of answering this question as to do so would incur disproportionate costs.

Driving Offences

Andrew Rosindell: To ask the Secretary of State for Transport how many incidents of road rage there have been in each of the last three years; and what steps he is taking to prevent these incidents. [66636]

Mike Penning: The term ‘road rage’ is used to cover a wide range of aggressive behaviour when one road user assaults another or threatens another due to their behaviour on the road. Unless a serious incident takes place the police do not become involved, and therefore no record of the number of incidents exists.

Contributions towards ‘road rage’ incidents include motoring offences for which the road user may be prosecuted under road traffic offences. The Government’s strategic framework for road safety includes a proposal to introduce a fixed penalty notice for careless driving, expected to start in 2012. This would allow more people to be offered rehabilitative education to combat behaviour such as ‘tail-gating’, which itself is at times unofficially described as ‘road rage’.

East Coast Railway Line: Finance

Ian Mearns: To ask the Secretary of State for Transport what recent discussions he has had with (a) officials from Directly Operated Railways Ltd and (b) ministerial colleagues and officials from the Department for Business, Innovation and Skills on the

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award of the east coast main line customer contact centre contract to Intelenet and Atos Origin. [58779]

Norman Baker [holding answer 10 June 2011]:Ministers from the Department for Transport have met with (a) representatives of Directly Operated Railways Ltd and (b) ministerial colleagues and officials from the Department for Business, Innovation and Skills, but not specifically to discuss this matter.

Officials from the Department meet regularly with train operating companies and the Department for Business, Innovation and Skills to discuss a wide range of issues.

First TransPennine Express: Contracts

Maria Eagle: To ask the Secretary of State for Transport which companies have been shortlisted to provide additional rolling stock for the TransPennine Express passenger rail franchise; and when he expects to announce the award of the contract. [65238]

Mrs Villiers: The Department is not procuring these trains and therefore is unable to disclose this information. The train operator is leading on this procurement.

The Department is in negotiation with TransPennine Express regarding the commercial terms for operating such trains. Should commercial agreement be reached between the parties, an announcement will be made in due course.

G4S

Keith Vaz: To ask the Secretary of State for Transport how many contracts his Department holds with G4S; and what the (a) purpose and (b) monetary value of each such contract is. [58670]

Norman Baker: The Department for Transport and its agencies holds 10 contracts with G4S. The purpose and monetary value for each contract are shown in the following table.

Agency name Purpose Value (£ per annum)

Driving Standards Agency

Collection of cheques and postal orders (Newcastle office)

2,000

Driving Standards Agency

Collection of cash (Nottingham office)

200

Driving Standards Agency

Security at Driving Standards Agency properties

22,500

Driver Vehicle Licensing Agency

Customer Service Accreditation

6,300

Driver Vehicle Licensing Agency

Security Carrier Service

250,000

Highways Agency

Recruitment framework for temporary RCC (Regional Control Centres) Operators 2009

200,000

Maritime and Coastguard Agency

Provision of car barrier and swipe card system

6,515

Maritime and Coastguard Agency

Provision of CCTV cameras and swipe card system

3,446

Maritime and Coastguard Agency

Provision of CCTV cameras and swipe card system

3,597

Maritime and Coastguard Agency

Provision of swipe card system

626

High Speed 2

Kwasi Kwarteng: To ask the Secretary of State for Transport what research his Department has commissioned on connections between the principal High Speed 2 stations and outlying areas. [65882]

Mr Philip Hammond: Although no specific research into connections between High Speed 2 (HS2) stations and outlying areas has been commissioned, a key factor in identifying station locations for HS2 has been the availability of local and regional transport links. HS2

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Ltd's modelling takes account of the impact of the accessibility of new stations on the proposed HS2 line, as well as the impact of passengers on the classic network. Details of the modelling and impacts on the wider transport network are available in the Economic Case for HS2:

http://highspeedrail.dft.gov.uk/library/documents

Subject to the outcome of the public consultation, the Department would work with local partners to ensure HS2 is effectively connected into local transport services.

Helen Jones: To ask the Secretary of State for Transport what assessment he has made of the potential effects of High Speed 2 on (a) the number of engineering jobs in the north-west during the construction of the line and (b) the economy of the north-west (i) during and (ii) after construction. [62370]

Mr Philip Hammond: HS2 Ltd estimates that around 9,000 jobs would be created to construct the new London-west midlands route, with a further 1,500 permanent jobs created in operations and maintenance. These figures would significantly rise under the Government's proposed ‘Y’ shaped high-speed rail network, which includes links to the north-east and north-west, and has the potential to generate benefits worth £44 billion over the appraisal period.

Although construction phase benefits have not been broken down to a regional level, new high-speed rail lines could provide business opportunities for firms throughout the UK's rail industry supply chain, including engineering firms. Once the London-west-midlands line is operational, HS2 Ltd forecast that based, on journeys starting in the north-west region, the north-west could experience 23% of the £22 billion-worth of potential benefits from the first phase of a new high-speed line.

High Speed 2: Fares

Andrea Leadsom: To ask the Secretary of State for Transport what discussions he has had with railway operators on his proposed fare structure for High Speed 2. [64821]

Mr Philip Hammond [holding answer 11 July 2011]: I have had no discussions with railway operators about any proposed fare structure for HS2.

The exact level and structure of fares on HS2 (London to west-midlands) would be determined closer to the time of opening of the scheme and would depend on a wide range of factors. The structure of regulation in the rail industry, the structure of franchises and the impact of competition from other rail operators (and indeed from air operators) could all affect the fares structures that might eventually be put in place on high-speed trains. For the purposes of the economic case, we have assumed that the level of fares on HS2 would be broadly similar to that currently in place on the west coast main line.

High Speed 2: Freight

Andrea Leadsom: To ask the Secretary of State for Transport what consideration he has given to the provision of a dedicated freight railway line for the routes to be served by High Speed 2. [64059]

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Mr Philip Hammond [holding answer 5 July 2011]: None. While HS2 would be capable of carrying freight, it is not planned to be used in this way. However, by releasing capacity on existing lines, HS2 would enable additional freight services on these lines.

High Speed 2: Income

Andrea Leadsom: To ask the Secretary of State for Transport what estimate he has made of the potential revenue to be generated from leasing High Speed 2 to private companies. [64774]

Mr Philip Hammond: No such estimate has been made at this stage.

Subject to the outcome of the current consultation, as part of their further development of their high-speed rail strategy, the Government would consider the appropriate long-term ownership and operating model for High Speed 2. This would be expected to include an assessment of the potential for generating revenue through granting a concession of the High Speed 2 line to a private sector concessionaire.

A 30-year operating concession for the HS1 line was let earlier this year for £2.1 billion—more than a third of the total construction cost of the project.