Aviation: Taiwan

Mr Bain: To ask the Secretary of State for Transport what his policy is on participation by Taiwan as an observer country in proceedings of the International Civil Aviation Organisation. [68030]

Mrs Villiers: The Government support Taiwan's practical participation in international organisations where this does not require statehood.

5 Sep 2011 : Column 210W

Taiwan continues to seek meaningful participation in the International Civil Aviation Organisation (ICAO) and has attended a number of ICAO events, including the 37th Assembly in October last year, in an unofficial capacity. However, we are not aware of there being any formal approaches to the organisation.

There have not been any formal discussions either with Taiwan or ICAO on this matter and it is for Taiwan itself to decide how it wishes to proceed.

Cycling: Accidents

Nicola Blackwood: To ask the Secretary of State for Transport how many pedestrian (a) injuries and (b) fatalities have resulted from collisions with cyclists in each year since 2003. [68458]

Mike Penning: The information requested is given in the following table:

Reported number of pedestrian casualties in accidents involving pedal cycles in Great Britain: 2003-10
Number of casualties

Killed Injured (1)

2003

4

255

2004

1

235

2005

3

276

2006

3

223

2007

4

225

2008

1

260

2009

0

292

2010

4

337

(1) Seriously and slightly injured

Dartford-Thurrock Crossing: Road Traffic

Jackie Doyle-Price: To ask the Secretary of State for Transport if he will assess the likely effect on traffic volumes at the Dartford Crossing of a new crossing to the west to link the North and South Circular Roads. [68651]

Mike Penning: The Department does not currently have any plans to assess the likely effect on traffic volumes at the Dartford Crossing of a new crossing to the west to link the North and South Circular Roads. However, the Department did make clear in its spending review announcement last autumn that it would embark on a review of the options for future capacity in the Lower Thames area. The Department is in the process of programming this work and will need to consider various factors that could influence traffic demand in defining the scope of further work.

Driving Offences

Gordon Henderson: To ask the Secretary of State for Transport how many drivers of non-UK registered vehicles were discovered driving in the UK beyond the allowed six-month period in (a) 2004, (b) 2005, (c) 2006, (d) 2007, (e) 2008, (f) 2009 and (g) 2010; and what steps his Department takes with respect to such drivers upon discovery. [68132]

Mike Penning: Between 2006 and 2011, 1,749 non-UK registered vehicles have been clamped for being in the UK for over six months without re-registering. The figures are not broken down on an annual basis.

5 Sep 2011 : Column 211W

If there is evidence that a foreign vehicle is in breach of the law, it can be clamped and impounded. In addition to enforcement action, the Driver and Vehicle Licensing Agency operate a strategy of education and awareness to tackle non-compliant unlicensed foreign vehicles. This approach has included presentations to community leaders, articles in the media, the issue of information leaflets and warning notices placed on vehicles' windscreens.

Gordon Henderson: To ask the Secretary of State for Transport what steps his Department takes to ensure that drivers of non-UK registered vehicles have appropriate motor insurance when driving in the UK. [68135]

Mike Penning: All drivers using roads in the UK must have at least third party insurance covering the use of their vehicle in this country. Under EU law all insurance policies issued in any EU member state must include the use of that vehicle for minimum third party risks for temporary visits to all EU member states.

Drivers must be able to produce evidence that they have the necessary insurance cover in place on request from the police.

Gordon Henderson: To ask the Secretary of State for Transport what steps his Department takes to identify drivers of non-UK registered vehicles who continue to drive in the UK beyond the allowed six-month period. [68136]

Mike Penning: There is no central database of non-UK registered vehicles; the Driver and Vehicle Licensing Agency (DVLA) rely on road sighting reported to them from the police, traffic enforcement officials and members of the public and it records details of sightings of foreign vehicles to assist in estimating the time a vehicle has been present in the UK. If there is evidence that a foreign vehicle is in breach of the law, it can be clamped and impounded.

The DVLA operate a strategy of education, warning as well as direct enforcement action to help tackle non-compliant unlicensed foreign vehicles. This approach has included presentations to community leaders, articles in the media, the issue of information leaflets and warning notices placed on vehicles' windscreens.

Driving Tests: Older People

Yasmin Qureshi: To ask the Secretary of State for Transport what consideration the Government has given to measures to ensure that drivers over the age of 70 are fit to drive a motor vehicle in the last 10 years. [69114]

Mike Penning: The Strategic Framework for Road Safety, published on 11 May 2011, considers the issue of older drivers continuing to drive. It makes clear that we do not believe that mandatory re-testing is the best way forward. We favour an approach which helps older drivers to maintain and adapt their skills, including providing advice and support on when to reduce or stop driving and change to other methods of travel to maintain mobility. The framework includes a number of examples of education schemes for older drivers provided by

5 Sep 2011 : Column 212W

local authorities and the training industry. We are looking to work with the voluntary sector and the training industry to develop further training schemes for older drivers.

Driving: Eyesight

Meg Munn: To ask the Secretary of State for Transport whether the number plate test for drivers meets the requirements of the EC Directive on Driving Licences 2009/113/EC which includes a recommendation for a visual field of at least 120 degrees. [68250]

Mike Penning: The number plate test is not intended or used to test the visual field. Optician based eyesight tests are used to ensure that those who have an underlying eye condition affecting the visual field are able to meet the appropriate standard.

Meg Munn: To ask the Secretary of State for Transport what data his Department has on the number of drivers on UK roads with eyesight that does not meet minimum standards required for safety. [68258]

Mike Penning: The Department does not hold data relating to the number of drivers on UK roads with eyesight that does not meet minimum standards.

Meg Munn: To ask the Secretary of State for Transport what evidence he has on the effects of the number plate test for driver's eyesight on the road casualty incidence. [68259]

Mike Penning: No evidence is held.

Driving: Stop and Search

Gordon Henderson: To ask the Secretary of State for Transport what percentage of drivers of non-UK registered vehicles who were stopped by the police on suspicion of committing a crime were found to have adequate motor insurance in each year from 2004. [68131]

Mike Penning: We do not hold the information.

All drivers using roads in the UK must have at least third party insurance covering the use of their vehicle in this country and be able to produce evidence that they have the necessary insurance cover in place on request from the police.

Live Animal Export

Graeme Morrice: To ask the Secretary of State for Transport if he will bring forward proposals to amend the Harbours, Docks and Piers Clauses Act 1847 to allow the owner of a port to refuse its use for the export of live animals. [69182]

Mike Penning: I refer the hon. Member to the answer I gave to the hon. Member for Bridgend (Mrs Moon) on 19 July 2011, Official Report, column 956W.

5 Sep 2011 : Column 213W

Liverpool Port

Caroline Nokes: To ask the Secretary of State for Transport (1) whether his Department has been notified of plans to build a baggage and passenger handling facility and additional vehicle bridge at the Liverpool Cruise Terminal; [68461]

(2) whether his Department has been notified of the plan by Liverpool city council to provide funding for a baggage and passenger handling facility and additional vehicle bridge at the Liverpool Cruise Terminal. [68462]

Mike Penning: The Department is aware that improvements to the terminal would be required in the event that cruise turnaround operations are allowed to commence there, and we understand that Liverpool city council has provisionally budgeted for some such works.

The consultation on the proposal to permit turnaround at the City of Liverpool Cruise Terminal, in return for a partial repayment of grant, ends on 15 September.

Caroline Nokes: To ask the Secretary of State for Transport what the net present value is of the proposal by Liverpool city council to pay £5.3 million to the Exchequer over 15 years for the purposes of permitting turnaround calls at Liverpool Cruise Terminal. [68463]

Mike Penning: The net present value of the repayments, as of any revenue stream, depends on the base period and discount rate applied. Using a 5% nominal rate on a base one year before the first repayment, the net present value would be approximately £3.75 million.

Caroline Nokes: To ask the Secretary of State for Transport what estimate he has made of the monetary value of potential economic effects (a) in Liverpool and (b) elsewhere associated with proposals to allow the Liverpool Cruise Terminal to be used for turnaround calls. [68464]

Mike Penning: I refer the hon. Member to the answer I gave to the hon. Member for Newcastle upon Tyne Central (Chi Onwurah) on 7 July 2011, Official Report, column 1317W.

Motor Vehicles: Testing

Mr Iain Wright: To ask the Secretary of State for Transport whether he has any plans to bring forward proposals relating to changes in the frequency of MOT testing; and if he will make a statement. [68452]

Mike Penning: I refer the hon. Member to my answer of 17 May 2011, Official Report, column 141W, to the hon. Member for Poplar and Limehouse (Jim Fitzpatrick).

Caroline Nokes: To ask the Secretary of State for Transport (1) what consideration he has given to changes in the rate of wear of tyres in formulating his plans to reform the MOT testing schedule; [68472]

(2) what estimate he has made of the savings that will arise from his planned changes to the MOT testing schedule. [68473]

5 Sep 2011 : Column 214W

Mike Penning: I refer my hon. Friend to my answer of 17 May 2011, Official Report, column 141W, to the hon. Member for Poplar and Limehouse (Jim Fitzpatrick).

Northern Rail: Rolling Stock

Julie Hilling: To ask the Secretary of State for Transport when commercial discussions with the Northern franchisee were initiated on the subject of provision of additional rolling stock to alleviate overcrowding on peak rail services in the North of England; and whether he has given consideration to using section 54 undertakings to reduce the costs of providing additional rolling stock on the Northern franchise in order to alleviate overcrowding in peak time rail services. [68095]

Mrs Villiers: Commercial discussions began in December 2009 after Northern Rail submitted a proposal for the procurement of additional rolling stock. The proposal was subsequently split into smaller interventions to assist delivery. Two agreements were signed in March 2010 for the operation of a net total of 18 additional carriages. Following the pause of the HLOS Programme due to the General Election in May 2010 and the subsequent spending review, negotiations resumed in January 2011 with Northern Rail for the conclusion of the remaining interventions. An agreement was reached in April 2011 for 20 additional EMU carriages and the final agreement was signed on 1 August 2011 for an additional 22 carriages.

A section 54 was not considered appropriate for the additional rolling stock proposed for operation.

Julie Hilling: To ask the Secretary of State for Transport which of the commitments in his Department's business plan relate to the provision of rolling stock on overcrowded rail services in the North of England; and what progress has been made on each such commitment. [68096]

Mrs Villiers: In its business plan, the Department is committed to complete the remaining negotiations with the Train Operating Companies for additional Diesel Multiple Units (DMU) by September 2011 and Electric Multiple Units (EMU) by December 2011.

So far the Department has completed negotiations for the operation of 20 additional EMU carriages and 22 DMU carriages in the north of England.

In addition, the Department is committed to the procurement of at least 36 new Electric Carriages for the Manchester-Scotland route by December 2011. Officials are currently in negotiation with TransPennine Express and expect to make an announcement later this year.

Overall, the Department is committed to introducing 650 additional carriages on the rail network between May 2010 and March 2014. This was announced on 25 November 2010 following the comprehensive spending review. At least 104 of these carriages will be deployed in the north of England. In addition, the lengthened Pendolino trains which are planned for the Intercity West Coast franchise will benefit cities in the north west of England.

5 Sep 2011 : Column 215W

Julie Hilling: To ask the Secretary of State for Transport how much funding his Department has allocated to provide additional carriages to alleviate overcrowding on peak services in the North of England under the Northern franchise agreement. [68097]

Mrs Villiers: The Department has agreed to provide Northern Rail with a total of £30.4 million for the operation of a total of net 60 additional carriages. This covers the net cost of additional passenger services until the end of the Northern Franchise.

Julie Hilling: To ask the Secretary of State for Transport what metrics his Department will use to measure progress in alleviating overcrowding on peak services into Greater Manchester under the Northern franchise agreement. [68098]

Mrs Villiers: In August 2011 the Office of Rail Regulation (ORR) published a new table based on summarised autumn 2010 passenger count data supplied by the DfT. This table covers AM peak arrivals and PM peak departures to/from each major regional city on a typical weekday in autumn 2010. It includes statistics on service provision (number of services and number of seats), passenger demand and number of standing passengers. This new table will be published annually as part of ORR’s National Rail Trends.

The four HLOS agreements with Northern Rail will deliver 82% of the 2007 White Paper capacity (seats and standing spaces) target for the three hour morning peak into Manchester. In addition, the East Midlands Trains agreement concluded in March 2010 increases this to 103% of the target. Northern Rail have the contractual obligations to meet this target and the TOC will be updating the Department on progress in achieving this.

Julie Hilling: To ask the Secretary of State for Transport how much additional rolling stock will be provided through the Northern franchise agreement to alleviate overcrowded peak rail services into Greater Manchester in each of the next three years; and how many services entering Greater Manchester between 07.00 and 09.59 will be allocated the additional carriages procured by his Department through Northern Rail under the Northern franchise agreement. [68099]

Mrs Villiers: On 1 August, the Department concluded a final agreement with Northern Rail to procure additional carriages to alleviate crowding into Manchester and other northern cities. The majority of the additional carriages provide capacity into Greater Manchester.

A total of 60 carriages will be introduced on the Northern Rail network. 10 of these are already in service and the remaining carriages will be introduced on the network in December 2011 and will be used until the end of the franchise.

A total of 34 Northern Rail services into Greater Manchester between 07.00 and 09.59 will be strengthened, providing an additional 3,363 spaces (seating and standing). In addition, the Department has also secured 840 spaces on East Midlands Trains services into Manchester Piccadilly.

5 Sep 2011 : Column 216W

Parliament Square: Accidents

Mr Amess: To ask the Secretary of State for Transport how many (a) males and (b) females in each age group were (i) killed, (ii) seriously injured and (iii) slightly injured crossing the road in Parliament Square in each of the last three years for which information is available. [68140]

Mike Penning: The number of reported pedestrian casualties injured on roads in Parliament Square in each of the last three years is as follows:

In 2008:

One male aged 20-29 was slightly injured; and

One female aged 30-39 was slightly injured.

In 2009:

Three males aged 30-39, 40-49, 50-59 were slightly injured.

In 2010:

One female aged 70-79 was seriously injured; and

Two females aged 12-15, 40-49, and one further of unknown age were slightly injured.

Railways

Kelvin Hopkins: To ask the Secretary of State for Transport what plans he has to introduce vertical integration on the rail network. [65269]

Mrs Villiers: The Department for Transport has taken receipt of Sir Roy McNulty's final report on the value for money of the railway. The Department will be working closely with the Office of Rail Regulation and the rail industry over the next few months to analyse Sir Roy's recommendations and to agree proposals for the reform of the industry. The Government are expected to publish their proposals for the future of the rail industry in November.

Mr Wallace: To ask the Secretary of State for Transport what steps he is taking to support the reinstatement of local railway branch lines. [68840]

Mrs Villiers: It is for local authorities and Passenger Transport Executives, working with local enterprise partnerships to determine whether a new railway line, train service or station is the best way to meet local transport needs and to secure funding for set up and running costs.

The Government have created opportunities for local promoters to secure funding for new local rail schemes by setting up the Regional Growth Fund and Local Sustainable Transport Fund, in addition to the Local Major Transport Schemes Budget.

Rescue Services: Scotland

Ann McKechin: To ask the Secretary of State for Transport what risk assessment on the closure of the coastguard stations at Clyde and Forth has been carried out; and if he will place a copy in the Library. [68197]

Mike Penning: The proposals that I published on 14 July 2011 included an assessment of the systemic risks associated with the existing national Coastguard structure, of which Clyde and Forth form a part.

The proposals for modernisation deal with the risks through the application of risk controls or mitigation.

5 Sep 2011 : Column 217W

This information can be found within the supporting documentation to the Consultation document that is available on the Maritime and Coastguard Agency’s website

www.dft.gov.uk/mca

Rolling Stock

Maria Eagle: To ask the Secretary of State for Transport what long-term rolling stock cascade plans his Department has prepared; and when he plans to announce them. [61256]

Mrs Villiers: Work is under way to provide additional rolling stock on many routes around the country. Combined with the IEP, Thameslink and Crossrail projects, our plan is that 2,700 new carriages will be in service by the end of 2019. 349 additional carriages were added to the network during the coalition's first 12 months in office and progress has been made on the procurement process for carriages to be delivered under the IEP, Thameslink and Crossrail programmes.

The last formal rolling stock plan was prepared by the previous administration, and published in July 2008. We will be considering Sir Roy McNulty's recommendations on rolling stock but start from the position that the rail industry should be best placed to lead on rolling stock cascade proposals, with the Government's role primarily focused on ensuring that these represent value for money.

Rolling Stock: Procurement

Margaret Beckett: To ask the Secretary of State for Transport how many passenger rail vehicles his Department has ordered from manufacturers domiciled in the UK since January 2004. [68847]

Mrs Villiers: The Department has not ordered any passenger rail vehicles since January 2004. The procurement of rolling stock is typically a matter for train operators and rolling stock leasing companies, with the Department's role being limited to ensuring that taxpayers and farepayers receive value for money.

The Department for Transport is leading on the procurement of vehicles for the Thameslink and Intercity Express Projects but these are only at preferred bidder stage.

While the Department facilitated the additional Class 390 Pendolino carriages that have recently begun to enter service, these were procured by Virgin West Coast Projects Ltd.

Some years ago the Department began the process to procure 200 new diesel carriages but this was cancelled once further electrification of the network was announced.

Margaret Beckett: To ask the Secretary of State for Transport what weighting is given in the evaluation of bids for rolling stock procured by his Department to (a) the RADAR plans for train manufacture and delivery submitted by bidders and (b) the empirical evidence of record of delivery of bidders in the UK and other countries. [69205]

Mrs Villiers: For rolling stock procurements led by the Department (namely the Thameslink and Intercity Express Programme procurements) bidders needed to

5 Sep 2011 : Column 218W

clear compliance and deliverability assessments in order to pass the pre-qualification process. The empirical evidence of bidders' delivery in the UK and other countries was assessed in each programme's Pre-Qualification Questionnaire using a derivative of the European Foundation for Quality Management (EFQM) Business Excellence Model aligned to the Department's objectives in conjunction with the RADAR method. The accreditation process for Thameslink, with associated weightings, may be viewed on the Department's website at:

http://webarchive.nationalarchives.gov.uk/20100409040702/http:/www.dft.gov.uk/pgr/rail/pi/thameslinkrollingstock/

Following pre-qualification the bidders' responses to the Thameslink Invitation to Tender were required to include management plans demonstrating project deliverability. The RADAR methodology was also applied here. The assessment used the information submitted in the bidders' plans. The project deliverability assessment for Thameslink and associated weightings can also be seen on the Department's website.

Shipping: EU Law

Jim Fitzpatrick: To ask the Secretary of State for Transport what assessment he has made of the UK's compliance with EU Directive 2009/16/EC on port state control; and how many foreign flagged high risk vessels have been inspected in the last period for which figures are available. [69203]

Mike Penning: The UK has implemented a risk-based inspection scheme from 1 January 2011 and is carrying out duties under the directive to detain substandard ships. Draft regulations to complete implementation of the directive are under consultation with the shipping industry with a view to their being in place by the end of the year. 19 high risk foreign flag ships have been inspected in the period 1 January to 31 July 2011.

Thameslink: Rolling Stock

Kelvin Hopkins: To ask the Secretary of State for Transport pursuant to the written ministerial statement of 16 June 2011, Official Report, columns 85-86WS, on Thameslink rolling stock, if he will make representations to the European Commission to seek to change the terms of the invitation to tender for the Thameslink contract to ensure that any effect on UK employment levels can be taken into account. [65660]

Mrs Villiers [holding answer 13 July 2011]: The Secretary of State does not propose to make representations to the European Commission to seek to change the terms of the invitation to tender for the Thameslink rolling stock contract.

He is satisfied that the process as advised to the bidders in the 2008 invitation to tender issued by the previous Government has been complied with. Neither the UK Government nor the European Commission has the power to make a retrospective change in terms of the tender which would override the rights of parties engaged in the tender process.

The Government will be considering the operation of EU procurement rules as part of our Growth Review, which may impact on future public sector procurement.

5 Sep 2011 : Column 219W

John McDonnell: To ask the Secretary of State for Transport (1) if he will estimate the proportion of the financing provided by members of the Cross London Trains consortium for the bid for the Thameslink rolling stock contract that came from pension funds from schemes in the (a) public and (b) private sector; and if he will list any pensions schemes that contributed funding to the bid; [68704]

(2) which companies have provided finance for the (a) bid for and (b) delivery of the Thameslink rolling stock contract by Siemens. [68717]

Mrs Villiers: Prior to the issue of the Thameslink Rolling Stock Project (TRSP) Invitation to Tender the Department entered into a Process Agreement with each bidder which requires the parties to maintain confidentiality during the TRSP procurement process.

The Process Agreement requires the Secretary of State for Transport and the Department to keep confidential all information of whatsoever nature made available by the Bidder directly or indirectly as part of the content or terms of any TRSP proposal. The Process Agreement remains in force and consequently neither the bidder nor the Department may disclose any details about the TRSP bidders' proposals.

John McDonnell: To ask the Secretary of State for Transport whether he has sought legal advice on the possibility of reversing the award of preferred bidder status for the Thameslink rolling stock contract. [68732]

Mrs Villiers: It is in the public interest that the decisions taken by the Secretary of State are taken in a fully informed legal context where relevant. Communications between the Secretary of State and his legal advisers are subject to legal advice privilege.

Margaret Beckett: To ask the Secretary of State for Transport whether (a) the public procurement rules or (b) the utilities rules were used for the Thameslink Rolling Stock Project. [68850]

Mrs Villiers: The Utilities Contracts Regulations 2006 are being used for this procurement.

This is clear from the OJEU notice published in April 2008, and was also confirmed in section 2.1.1 of the Invitation to Tender (ITT), which is available on the DfT website.

Planning

Maria Eagle: To ask the Secretary of State for Transport (1) what impact assessment his Department has carried out on potential changes in parking provision arising from draft version 4 of the National Planning Policy Framework; [67426]

(2) whether rural developments will require the same provision of transport links as are required in urban areas under the provisions of draft version 4 of the National Planning Policy Framework. [67428]

Robert Neill: I have been asked to reply.

The National Planning Policy Framework consultation, which includes a draft impact assessment, was launched on 25 July. Copies of all documents are in the Library of the House.

5 Sep 2011 : Column 220W

Home Department

Association of Chief Police Officers: Finance

Mr Burley: To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department what funding her Department provided to the Association of Chief Police Officers for property for the use of police officers and police staff in (a) the City of Westminster, (b) Greater London and (c) England and Wales in each of the last five years. [60055]

Nick Herbert: The Home Office does not hold this information.

Accidents: Fees and Charges

Mr Knight: To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department which police forces in England and Wales have received money from accident referral fees in the last 12 months for which figures are available; and how much each such force received. [66839]

James Brokenshire [holding answer 19 July 2011]: The Home Office does not maintain records of police operational practice. Police forces should not make referrals of the sort suggested. Both the police and their contractors are bound by data protection legislation. When necessary the police do make arrangements for the removal of vehicles, including those involved in road traffic collisions. They contract with vehicle recovery operators for this work. The charges the police can impose on vehicle owners for such removals are set by secondary legislation and aim to meet the costs incurred. The exercise of their removal powers and the arrangements made in every case are operational matters for the police forces concerned.

Alcoholic Drinks: Crime

Justin Tomlinson: To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department what evidence her Department has collated of improved public behaviour among late night drinkers in towns and cities since 2010. [68945]

James Brokenshire: The Home Office has not collated evidence specifically on improved public behaviour among late night drinkers in towns and cities since 2010.

The Home Office routinely asks about public perceptions of drunk and rowdy behaviour and whether victims of violent crime believed the offender to be under the influence of alcohol, through the British Crime Survey.

Findings from the 2010-11 British Crime Survey showed that 23.7% of adults perceived problems with drunk or rowdy behaviour in their local area. This proportion was similar to the level in the 2009-10 survey (23.9%), with the apparent decrease not being statistically significant. The results were published in Crime in England and Wales 2010-11 in July 2011 and are available at:

http://www.homeoffice.gov.uk/publications/science-research-statistics/research-statistics/crime-research/hosb1011/hosb1011?view=Binary

According to the 2009-10 British Crime Survey, victims believed the offender(s) to be under the influence of alcohol in 50% (equating to 986,000) of all violent incidents. These levels were similar to the ones in the 2008-09 survey where victims believed the offender(s) to

5 Sep 2011 : Column 221W

be under the influence of alcohol in 47% (equating to 973,000) of all violent incidents. These results were published in Crime in England and Wales 2009-10 in July 2010 and are available at:

http://www.homeoffice.gov.uk/publications/science-research-statistics/research-statistics/crime-research/hosb1210/hosb1210?view=Binary

Corresponding figures for 2010-11 will be published in October 2011 as part of the ‘Nature of Crime’ tables to be released alongside the October Crime in England and Wales Quarterly Update bulletin.

Copies of the full crime statistics reports have been placed in the House Libraries.

5 Sep 2011 : Column 222W

Alcoholic Drinks: Young People

Justin Tomlinson: To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department how many prosecutions there have been (a) in total and (b) in each local authority area for offences of the sale of alcohol to persons under the age of 18 since 2003. [68943]

James Brokenshire: Defendants proceeded against at the magistrates courts for the sale of alcohol to persons aged under 18, by police force area in England and Wales from 2003 to 2010 can be viewed in the table.

Information available centrally does not allow a breakdown of cases by local authority area.

Defendants proceeded against at the magistrates courts for the sale of alcohol to persons aged under 18 (1) , by police force area, England and Wales, 2003-10 (2,3)

2003 2004 2005 2006 2007 2008 (4) 2009 2010

Avon and Somerset

2

14

5

1

6

9

10

Bedfordshire

2

7

10

24

2

1

4

Cambridgeshire

4

9

27

10

8

Cheshire

16

20

8

6

6

9

4

6

City of London

1

Cleveland

4

10

14

11

13

10

6

3

Cumbria

1

1

8

1

1

4

1

Derbyshire

37

22

13

8

7

17

20

Devon and Cornwall

12

8

6

5

1

1

Dorset

9

10

35

7

2

3

5

1

Durham

2

2

3

7

1

19

Essex

7

2

8

16

14

4

5

1

Gloucestershire

1

5

10

3

10

1

Greater Manchester

129

180

117

160

35

39

30

32

Hampshire

9

11

2

4

9

8

5

Hertfordshire

1

8

3

40

24

2

3

3

Humberside

11

2

6

5

1

1

1

Kent

12

15

14

2

2

6

2

2

Lancashire

23

22

89

32

27

33

41

10

Leicestershire

15

10

27

45

55

9

8

8

Lincolnshire

17

4

11

10

3

6

3

7

Merseyside

42

19

16

34

28

24

19

5

Metropolitan Police

113

167

253

236

176

76

86

55

Norfolk

1

9

3

2

1

2

1

North Yorkshire

7

22

3

68

29

1

1

Northamptonshire

11

13

7

5

7

14

Northumbria

38

51

79

41

12

13

7

5

Nottinghamshire

9

11

37

5

7

6

4

South Yorkshire

5

18

10

9

4

8

11

Staffordshire

8

5

20

23

26

19

22

6

Suffolk

1

3

4

1

3

5

Surrey

4

10

13

18

5

8

1

3

Sussex

8

4

4

33

11

7

9

1

Thames Valley

6

23

15

36

20

2

8

9

Warwickshire

27

26

7

2

1

1

2

1

West Mercia

7

5

19

10

5

3

4

5

West Midlands

20

45

76

74

57

44

35

20

West Yorkshire

2

21

15

17

9

9

7

6

Wiltshire

6

10

23

10

6

1

2

Dyfed-Powys

5

24

6

18

13

4

1

2

Gwent

2

20

16

21

13

9

13

19

North Wales

7

5

10

4

8

11

3

10

South Wales

29

34

55

72

29

23

38

24

5 Sep 2011 : Column 223W

5 Sep 2011 : Column 224W

England and Wales

616

861

1,084

1,199

693

459

430

324

(1) Offences include: Sale of alcohol to person under 13; Persistently selling alcohol to children; Selling etc. intoxicating liquor to person under 18 for consumption on the premises; Allowing sale of alcohol to person under 18; Wholesaler selling intoxicating liquor to a person under 18. (2) The figures given in the table on court proceedings relate to persons for whom these offences were the principal offences for which they were dealt with. When a defendant has been found guilty of two or more offences it is the offence for which the heaviest penalty is imposed. Where the same disposal is imposed for two or more offences, the offence selected is the offence for which the statutory maximum penalty is the most severe. (3) Every effort is made to ensure that the figures presented are accurate and complete. However, it is important to note that these data have been extracted from large administrative data systems generated by the courts and police forces. As a consequence, care should be taken to ensure data collection processes and their inevitable limitations are taken into account when those data are used. (4) Excludes data for Cardiff magistrates court for April, July and August 2008. Source: Justice Statistics Analytical Services—Ministry of Justice

Animal Experiments: Scotland

Cathy Jamieson: To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department how many places in Scotland were designated as a (a) supplying establishment, (b) breeding establishment and (c) scientific procedure establishment under the Animals (Scientific Procedures) Act 1986 as at the end of 2010. [67994]

Lynne Featherstone: As at 31 December 2010, there were 32 establishments in Scotland designated as scientific procedure establishments under the Animals (Scientific Procedures) Act 1986. Of these, 13 were also designated as breeding establishments and 19 as supplying establishments.

Cathy Jamieson: To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department how many regulated procedures under the Animals (Scientific Procedures) Act 1986 were carried out in Scotland in 2010. [67995]

Lynne Featherstone: The number of regulated procedures started under the Animals (Scientific Procedures) Act 1986 in Scotland in 2010 was 590,826.

Cathy Jamieson: To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department how many project licences were granted under the Animals (Scientific Procedures) Act 1986 in 2010; and how many such project licences were in force at the end of 2010 in respect of work to be carried out in Scotland. [67996]

Lynne Featherstone: In 2010, 515 project licences were granted under the Animals (Scientific Procedures) Act 1986, of which 100 were held at designated establishments in Scotland. A total of 2,614 were in force at the end of 2010, of which 467 were in force in Scotland.

Cathy Jamieson: To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department what proportion of regulated procedures conducted in Scotland under the Animals (Scientific Procedures) Act 1986 have been performed in (a) public health laboratories, (b) universities and medical schools, (c) NHS hospitals, (d) Government Departments, (e) other public bodies, (f) non-profit-making organisations and (g) commercial organisations in 2011 to date. [67997]

Lynne Featherstone: During 2010, in Scotland the total number of procedures started under the Animals (Scientific Procedures) Act 1986 was 590,826. Of these, 469,481 or 79% were carried out at universities or medical schools, 33,325 or 6% at Government Departments, 46,556 or 8% at other public bodies, and 41,464 or 7% at commercial organisations. None were started at public health laboratories, NHS hospitals or non-profit making organisations.

Cathy Jamieson: To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department what proportion of regulated procedures conducted in Scotland under the Animals (Scientific Procedures) Act 1986 were carried out for (a) fundamental and applied studies other than toxicity and (b) toxicity tests or other safety and efficacy evaluation in 2010. [67998]

Lynne Featherstone: During 2010, in Scotland, the number of regulated procedures started for non-toxicological purposes under the Animals (Scientific Procedures) Act 1986 was 543,050 (92%), and the number started for toxicological purposes was 47,776 (8%).

Cathy Jamieson: To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department how many infringements of the Animals (Scientific Procedures) Act 1986 were recorded in Scotland in 2010; and how many such infringements resulted in a prosecution. [68042]

Lynne Featherstone: Four infringements of the Animals (Scientific Procedures) Act 1986 were reported at designated establishments in Scotland during 2010. No prosecutions resulted.

Cathy Jamieson: To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department what proportion of regulated procedures under the Animals (Scientific Procedures) Act 1986 carried out in Scotland were conducted without anaesthesia in 2010. [68043]

Lynne Featherstone: There were a total of 590,826 regulated procedures started under the Animals (Scientific Procedures) Act 1986 in Scotland in 2010 of which 414,528 (70%) used no form of anaesthesia.

Cathy Jamieson: To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department what proportion of project licences granted under the Animals (Scientific Procedures) Act 1986 that were in force in Scotland were in (a) mild, (b) moderate, (c) substantial and (d) unclassified severity bandings as at the end of 2010. [68044]

Lynne Featherstone: In Scotland, 37% of the project licences granted under the Animals (Scientific Procedures) Act 1986 that were in force at the end of 2010 were in a mild severity banding, 58% in moderate, 2% in substantial and 3% were in an unclassified severity banding.

5 Sep 2011 : Column 225W

Cathy Jamieson: To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department how many (a) genetically-modified animals and (b) animals with a harmful genetic defect were used in regulated procedures conducted in Scotland under the Animals (Scientific Procedures) Act 1986 in 2010. [68045]

Lynne Featherstone: A total of 579,905 animals were used in regulated procedures started under the Animals (Scientific Procedures) Act 1986 in Scotland in 2010, of which 212,811 were genetically modified and 12,752 were animals with a harmful genetic defect.

Cathy Jamieson: To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department how many (a) mice, (b) rats, (c) guinea pigs, (d) hamsters, (e) rabbits, (f) horses and other equids, (g) sheep, (h) pigs, (i) birds, (j) amphibians, (k) reptiles, (l) fish, (m) cats, (n) dogs, (o) new world primates and (p) old world primates were used in regulated procedures conducted in Scotland under the Animals (Scientific Procedures) Act 1986 in 2010. [68046]

Lynne Featherstone: During 2010, in Scotland, there were 323,740 mice, 36,890 rats, 1,091 guinea pigs, 755 hamsters, 1,683 rabbits, 27 horses and other equids, 4,706 sheep, 447 pigs, 12,750 birds, 817 amphibians, 193,543 fish, four cats, 442 dogs, 40 new world primates and 370 old world primates used in regulated procedures started under the 1986 Act. No reptiles were used.

Cathy Jamieson: To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department how many individual animals were used in regulated procedures under the Animals (Scientific Procedures) Act 1986 in Scotland in 2010. [68047]

Lynne Featherstone: During 2010, in Scotland, there were 579,905 animals used in regulated procedures started under the Animals (Scientific Procedures) Act 1986.

Asylum

Dr Huppert: To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department how many applications for removal from the Detained Fast Track procedure have been made since 2006; and what proportion were approved in each such year. [68578]

Damian Green: We are unable to provide accurate data relating to this question. It is open to detainees or their representatives to ask for release at any point during their detention. It is also open to detainees to apply to the courts for bail at any time in order that there is judicial oversight of the process. Many do so on multiple occasions and it is therefore not possible, to identify an accurate figure.

Dr Huppert: To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department what the most frequent reasons for detainee removal from the Detained Fast Track programme was in the last 12 months for which figures are available. [68581]

Damian Green: In the financial year 2010-11 the Detained Fast Track processes dealt with a total intake of 2,694 asylum seekers. A total of 820 detainees were

5 Sep 2011 : Column 226W

released from the processes that were not granted asylum or removed from the UK. The most common reasons for those releases were:

1. pre decision appointments made by the Medical Foundation for the Care of Victims of Torture or the Helen Bamber Foundation resulting in release from detention: 150 detainees

2. detainees released who had failed in their asylum applications and in respect of whom the only barrier to removal from the United Kingdom was the lack of a travel document (which was not forthcoming from their country of origin): 126 releases

3. applicants granted bail by the courts: 81 detainees

4. Cases reclassified by the courts and released from Detained Fast Track: 75 detainees.

Sky TV

Luciana Berger: To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department how much her Department has spent on subscriptions to Sky TV since May 2010. [67566]

Damian Green: The Home Department did not subscribe to Sky TV in the period commencing May 2010 to date, and therefore no payments have been made.

Ministerial Meetings: News Corporation

Jonathan Reynolds: To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department (1) what (a) meetings and (b) other engagements (i) Ministers and (ii) special advisers in her Department attended which were also attended by (A) representatives, (B) journalists and (C) other employees of (1) News International and its subsidiary organisations including newspapers, (2) News Corporation and its subsidiary organisations and (3) BSkyB since 12 May 2010. [66135]

(2) what (a) meetings and (b) other engagements (i) Ministers and (ii) special advisers in her Department attended which were also attended by Mr Andrew Coulson (A) between 12 May 2010 and 21 January 2011 and (B) since 21 January 2011. [66134]

Damian Green [holding answer 14 July 2011]: As has been the practice of previous Administrations, information relating to internal meetings, discussions and advice is not normally disclosed.

I refer the hon. Member to the Prime Minister's statement to the House on 13 July 2011, Official Report, columns 311-14.

Cannabis

Mr Woodward: To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department how many (a) arrests, (b) prosecutions and (c) convictions for (i) possession and (ii) supply of cannabis in St Helens South and Whiston constituency there have been in each of the last five years. [69010]

James Brokenshire: Information reported to the Home Office on arrests is not broken down below offence group level, therefore it is not possible to identify specific offences from the 'drug offences' offence group.

The table, provided by the Ministry of Justice, shows the number of defendants proceeded against at magistrates courts and found guilty at all courts for possession, supply and possession with intent to supply cannabis in Merseyside police force area, 2006 to 2010 (latest available).

5 Sep 2011 : Column 227W

Court proceedings data collated centrally by the Ministry of Justice are not available at parliamentary constituency level.

5 Sep 2011 : Column 228W

Court proceedings data for 2011 are planned for publication in the spring, 2012.

Defendants proceeded against at the magistrates courts and found guilty at all courts for possession, supply and possession with intent to supply cannabis, Merseyside, 2006-10 (1, 2, 3)
  2006 2007 2008 2009 2010
Merseyside police force area Proceeded against Found guilty Proceeded against Found guilty Proceeded against Found guilty Proceeded against Found guilty Proceeded against Found guilty

Possession cannabis

424

386

1,074

1,022

1,491

1,416

2,256

2,128

2,671

2,431

Possession with intent to supply cannabis

49

52

71

51

92

71

99

76

148

103

Supply cannabis

13

17

19

23

39

30

15

19

21

25

(1) The figures given in the table on court proceedings relate to persons for whom these offences were the principal offences for which they were dealt with. When a defendant has been found guilty of two or more offences it is the offence for which the heaviest penalty is imposed. Where the same disposal is imposed for two or more offences, the offence selected is the offence for which the statutory maximum penalty is the most severe. (2) Every effort is made to ensure that the figures presented are accurate and complete. However, it is important to note that these data have been extracted from large administrative data systems generated by the courts and police forces. As a consequence, care should be taken to ensure data collection processes and their inevitable limitations are taken into account when those data are used. (3) Cannabis was re-classified to a class B drug on 26 January 2009. Source: Justice Statistics Analytical Services—Ministry of Justice.

Conditions of Employment

Julian Smith: To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department how many meetings officials of her Department have had with the Department for Business, Innovation and Skills on the Government's employment law review since May 2011. [67344]

Damian Green [holding answer 18 July 2011]: I refer my hon. Friend to the answer given on 21 June 2011, Official Report, column 203W.

Crime: Children

Clive Efford: To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department what research her Department has (a) commissioned and (b) undertaken on (i) child victims of crime and (ii) child criminals since May 2010; and if she will make a statement. [66807]

James Brokenshire: The Home Office has commissioned or undertaken the following research specifically concerning child victims of crime and child criminals since May 2010.

(i) C hild victims

Since January 2009, the British Crime Survey (BCS) was extended to cover victimisation of children aged 10 to 15 years. Figures from the 2009-10 and 2010-11 surveys for this age group were published on 14 July 2011:

http://www.homeoffice.gov.uk/publications/science-research-statistics/research-statistics/crime-research/hosb1011

Earlier in 2011 the Home Office completed and published an assessment of phase 2 of the Tackling Knives and Serious Youth Violence Action programme, which ran from April 2009 to March 2010. The Programme aimed to reduce serious violence involving 13 to 24-year-olds, both as victims and offenders:

http://www.homeoffice.gov.uk/publications/science-research-statistics/research-statistics/crime-research/horr53/

A review of the literature on routes of human trafficking (including of children) into the UK is currently being completed, with a view to being published later in the year.

(ii) Child criminals

In autumn 2010 the Home Office commissioned an evaluation of schemes based in police stations that assess young people who have been arrested and can, where appropriate, divert them into other interventions and services. Additionally, the Home Office is carrying out analysis to produce estimates of how much recorded crime is attributable to young people (aged 10 to 17). Both studies will be completed later this year.

Crime: Older People

Simon Kirby: To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department what steps her Department is taking to reduce fear of crime amongst the elderly population. [68809]

James Brokenshire: The proportions of adults worried about burglary, car crime and violent crime in 2009-10 and 2010-11 are at their lowest since questions on this were introduced into the British Crime Survey. Police forces, working with local partners, are responsible for tackling crime—including concerns of the local elderly population. The Government are freeing up the police from bureaucracy and red tape to do so. We have given the public the information they need about local crime through crime maps, and are introducing a national non-emergency police number (101) to enable the public to contact the police more easily. These developments, together with neighbourhood policing teams, beat meetings and, in due course, elected police and crime commissioners, will ensure all sections of the community (including the elderly) can hold their force to account.

Simon Kirby: To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department what steps her Department is taking to ensure that partnerships, groups and schemes, that are working to tackle crime and fear of crime for elderly residents in local communities are communicated effectively. [68811]

5 Sep 2011 : Column 229W

James Brokenshire: The Home Office works in partnership with the voluntary sector to tackle crime and fear of crime. One aspect of this approach is the Home Office's work with the voluntary sector to communicate effectively the schemes that are available to tackle crime and fear of crime for elderly residents in local communities.

The Home Office funded Age UK, working in partnership with the Neighbourhood and Home Watch Network, Victim Support, and the home improvement agency sector, to run a project to reduce the fear of crime through the delivery of a training programme, earlier this year, to empower vulnerable elderly people to take the steps they need to keep themselves safe in their home and community. Age UK estimate that their message was communicated to more than 7,500 vulnerable people, and that over 5,500 of them took actions to improve their home or personal security. It is estimated that a further 6,000 people will be reached through the work of Victim Support.

Cybercrime

Dan Jarvis: To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department what assessment she has made of the potential contribution of the prevent strategy to reducing the level of cyber-terrorism. [66175]

James Brokenshire [holding answer 18 July 2011]: The Prevent strategy is concerned with the threat posed by terrorists to radicalise and recruit people to their cause, including their use of the internet for these purposes and forms one part of the Government's overarching counter-terrorism strategy—Contest.

The Prevent strategy aims to mitigate the threat of terrorist use of the internet by restricting access to unlawful online content in specific premises, such as schools, public libraries and other public buildings; and ensuring that action is taken to try to remove unlawful content from the internet. The legal framework for this is provided by sections 1 and 2 of the Terrorism Act 2006 (TACT).

The Prevent strategy also calls on the public to assist in reducing the level of terrorist content on the internet. Members of the public who encounter terrorist or extremist content online are able to anonymously refer it to the Metropolitan police's Counter Terrorism Internet Referral Unit (CTIRU). If the content breaches TACT, the CTIRU act to remove the content and where possible they mount prosecutions.

Encampment: Parliament Square

Mr Amess: To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department (1) what steps she is (a) taking and (b) plans to take to assist in the removal of tents in Parliament Square; what recent representations she has received on this issue; from whom; what response was given; and if she will make a statement; [68141]

(2) how many complaints have been received by her Department about the encampment in Parliament Square in each of the last 12 months; from whom; and if she will make a statement; [68442]

(3) if she will require a report from the Commissioner of Police for the Metropolis about the encampment in Parliament Square; how many persons

5 Sep 2011 : Column 230W

have been

(a)

arrested and

(b)

prosecuted for any offences connected with the encampment in the latest period for which figures are available; and if she will make a statement. [68443]

Nick Herbert: The Government have brought forward measures in the Police Reform and Social Responsibility Bill to assist in the removal of tents on Parliament Square. The Government have liaised with a number of agencies including the Westminster City Council, the Greater London Authority and the Metropolitan Police Service on the issue of Parliament Square and the measurements in the Police Reform and Social Responsibility Bill.

The Home Office has received regular correspondence from MPs, peers and the public expressing a range of views on Parliament Square. The Home Office does not collect data on persons arrested or prosecuted for any offences connected with the encampment on Parliament Square and there are no plans to commission a report from the Commissioner of the Metropolitan Police.

Advertising

Gavin Williamson: To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department how much her Department has spent on (a) television, (b) radio and (c) newspaper advertising in (i) real and (ii) nominal terms between May 2005 and May 2006; and what the total cost to the public purse was. [68379]

Damian Green: The following table outlines Home Office and its Executive agencies' spend on advertising in (a) television, (b) radio, (c) newspapers for the financial years 2005-06 and 2006-07.

The question relates to advertising spend for the period May 2005 to May 2006 however costs are charged on a financial yearly basis and as a result cannot be split for the period May 2005 to May 2006 without incurring disproportionate cost.

£

2005-06 2006-07

TV

4,133,914

5,412,325

Radio

1,824,869

3,045,302

Newspapers

1,575,738

1,771,686

Total

7,534,521

10,229,313

Air Travel

John Mann: To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department on what occasions she has flown on official business (a) by budget airline and (b) in economy class in the last 12 months. [67917]

Damian Green: For greater transparency all information relating to ministerial travel is published on a quarterly basis including purpose and cost.

I refer the hon. Member to:

http://www.homeoffice.gov.uk/about-us/non-personal-data/hospitality-business-expenses/

All travel undertaken by Home Office Ministers is compliant with s10 of the ‘Ministerial Code’ which stipulates that Ministers must ensure that they always make efficient and cost-effective travel arrangements.

5 Sep 2011 : Column 231W

Departmental Billing

Gavin Williamson: To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department how many late payments her Department has made to contractors between May 2005 and May 2006; and what the total cost to the public purse was of any (a) penalty charges or (b) interest charges incurred in that period. [68323]

Damian Green: For the period between May 2005 and May 2006 the Home Department, inclusive of its executive agencies, made 28,554 late payments but did not incur any payment penalties or interest charges for late payments to contractors.

Charitable Donations

Chris Ruane: To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department what steps she is taking to encourage charitable giving by Ministers in her Department. [57122]

Damian Green: Charitable giving is strongly encouraged within the Home Office and across Government as a whole. This is demonstrated by all Government Ministers making a pledge to undertake a ‘one day challenge’ with a charity or community group of their choice. This is a clear and public commitment by Ministers across Government to give their time to help others. This pledge aims to inspire others to consider how they might be able to support their communities to benefit themselves, as well as their chosen organisations. The Government's proposals to make it easier and more

5 Sep 2011 : Column 232W

attractive to give time and money to good causes are outlined in the ‘Giving White Paper’ which was published in May 2011.

Furthermore, the Home Office encourages staff to actively engage in charitable giving by providing the opportunity to take five days special leave per year to volunteer at an organisation of their choice.

Consultants

Austin Mitchell: To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department how many senior civil servants in her Department at each grade had worked for PricewaterhouseCoopers, Ernst & Young, Deloitte or KPMG immediately prior to taking up their appointment in each of the last four years; what consultancy agreements her Department had with those firms in each such year; and how many consultants from those firms have advised her Department in each such year. [68952]

Damian Green: Information relating to the number of senior civil servants who have worked for the four companies in question in the last four years is not held centrally by the Home Department, inclusive of its Executive Agencies, and could be obtained only at disproportionate cost.

Information on each consultancy agreement the Home Department has with these firms for the last four years could be collated only at disproportionate cost. The total value of agreements with these firms in each of the last four years can be found in the following table:

£
  Financial year
Supplier 2010-11 2009-10 2008-09 2007-08

PricewaterhouseCoopers LLP

147,843

274,818

983,561

2,526,561

Ernst & Young

26,609,058

38,605,862

16,461,863

2,876,880

Deloitte

7,021,961

22,852,700

22,267,626

10,526,636

KPMG

8,174,750

18,238,547

16,612,225

5,975,926

The Home Department procures consultancy as a service rather than appointing individuals. We therefore do not capture the number of consultants who have advised the Department in the last four years.

Ministerial Policy Advisers

Gavin Williamson: To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department how many (a) special advisers and (b) press officers were employed by her Department between May 2005 and May 2006; and what the cost to the public purse was in (i) cash and (ii) real terms of such appointments. [68327]

Damian Green: Information on special advisers has been published annually in written ministerial statements since 2003. These statements are published in July of each year. The statements document details of advisers in post at the given date but costs refer to the previous financial year and before 2009-10 were estimated costs.

Details of special advisers between May 2005 and May 2006 were published on 21 July 2005, Official Report, column 156WS, and costs were published on 24 July 2006, Official Report, column 91WS.

The information in the following table provides the number and cost of press officers employed by the Home Office and its agencies for the 2005-06 and 2006-07 financial years.

Figures are recorded by financial year and cannot be split to give costs between May 2005 and May 2006.

Financial year Number of press officers Cost of press officers (£)

2005-06

34

1,616,410

2006-07

35

1,699,087

Mobile Phones

Gavin Williamson: To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department how many mobile telephones and BlackBerrys were provided to staff in her Department between May 2005 and May 2006; and what the total cost to the public purse was of (a) line rental, (b) insurance and (c) the purchase of such telecommunications equipment. [68321]

5 Sep 2011 : Column 233W

Damian Green: During the period May 2005 and May 2006, 4,181 mobile telephones and BlackBerrys were provided to staff in the Home Department. Details

5 Sep 2011 : Column 234W

of

(a)

line rental,

(b)

insurance and

(c)

telecommunications equipment are listed in the following table:

Area Number of mobile telephones and BlackBerrys provided (a) Line rental (£) (b) Insurance (£) (c) Telecommunications equipment (£)

HO HQ and UKBA

4,080

18,240

Nil

11,920

IPS

(1)

(2)

(2)

(2)

CRB

101

4,188.44

Nil

Nil

(1) IPS has never provided staff with BlackBerrys. Active mobile phone account information records only go back one year and one month. The information required to respond to this question is only held in hard copy so we would reach the disproportionate cost threshold in order to provide information on mobile phones. (2) Information can be obtained only at disproportionate cost.

Official Cars

Stephen Williams: To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department what the cost to her Department was of the provision of Ministerial cars in each financial year between 2000-01 and 2010-11; how many (a) cars for the exclusive use of Ministers and (b) Ministerial car journeys were paid for by her Department in each such year; what the average cost to her Department of a Ministerial car journey was in each such year; and what steps her Department has taken to reduce the cost of Ministerial cars since her appointment. [63001]

Damian Green: All information relating to the provision of ministerial car travel is published on an annual basis by the Department for Transport in a written ministerial statement, the details of which can be found in the Libraries of both Houses. In terms of reducing costs; Home Office Ministers no longer have an allocated driver and have to use the ‘Ministerial Car Pool’ which is compliant with Section 10 of the Ministerial Code. The exception being the Secretary of State for the Home Department, the right hon. Member for Maidenhead (Mrs May), who is driven by the Metropolitan Police for security purposes.

Gavin Williamson: To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department what the total cost to the public purse was of (a) cars leased by her Department to staff and (b) Ministerial chauffeurs between May 2005 and May 2006. [68383]

Damian Green: The Home Office accounting system is the principal record of Home Office financial data. This does not record details of vehicle leasing to the level required to answer this question.

Although the Home Office accounting system does not disaggregate the cost of ministerial chauffeurs from other car hire costs, the full costs of Home Office ministerial cars to the public purse are published at:

www.publications.parliament.uk

Procurement

Julian Smith: To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department how many procurement contracts her Department has awarded to small businesses since May 2010. [67233]

Damian Green: The Home Department, inclusive of executive agencies and non-departmental public bodies (NDPBs), does not capture this information and therefore detail could be provided only at disproportionate cost. Spend with small and medium enterprises totals £231 million since May 2010.

Julian Smith: To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department what proportion of procurement contracts offered by her Department have been advertised on the Contracts Finder website since the website's inception. [67234]

Damian Green: The Contracts Finder website went live on September 2010. Since this time 18% of the Home Department’s procurement contracts have been published on this facility. The remaining contracts awarded fell outside the website's criteria.

Rail Travel

Gavin Williamson: To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department what the cost to the public purse was for (a) first class and (b) all train travel by (i) Ministers, (ii) staff and (iii) special advisers in her Department between May 2005 and May 2006. [68340]

Damian Green: The Home Office accounting system is the principal record of Home Office financial data. This does not record expenditure on train travel to the level of detail required to answer this question. A full answer to the question could not be provided without incurring disproportionate cost.

Departmental Responsibilities

Chris Ruane: To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department if she will consider keeping data on the number of times (a) she and (b) officials of her Department have declined a request for a meeting from an hon. Member of each political party. [67186]

Damian Green: There is no requirement for the Department to hold details of the number of meetings declined and there are no plans to do so.

Stationery

Gavin Williamson: To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department what the total cost to the public purse was of stationery purchased by her Department between May 2005 and May 2006. [68387]

Damian Green: The Home Department and its Executive Agencies spent £2.8 million on general administrative stationery between May 2005 and May 2006.

5 Sep 2011 : Column 235W

Departmental Training

Gavin Williamson: To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department what the (a) date, (b) location, (c) number of attendees and (d) cost to the public purse was for each (i) awayday and (ii) team building activity organised for staff in her Department between May 2005 and May 2006. [68333]

Damian Green: Details of staff awaydays and team building activities are not held in a central location within the Home Office.

The Home Office accounting system is the principal record of Home Office financial data. This does not record expenditure on staff awaydays to the level of detail required to answer this question. A full answer to the question could not be provided without incurring disproportionate costs.

All expenditure on awaydays is incurred in accordance with the principles of Managing Public Money and the Treasury handbook on Regularity and Propriety.

Official Overseas Visits

Gavin Williamson: To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department how many overseas visits were made by (a) Ministers, (b) civil servants and (c) special advisers in her Department between May 2005 and May 2006; and what the cost to the public purse was of each such visit. [68357]

Damian Green: The Home Office accounting system is the principal record of Home Office financial data. This does not record expenditure on overseas travel to the level of detail required to answer this question. A full answer to the question could not be provided without incurring disproportionate cost.

Deportation

Priti Patel: To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department how many foreign nationals in the UK she is unable to deport on human rights grounds; and how many such people have committed offences while resident in the UK. [63854]

Damian Green: Information about the number of foreign nationals that the UK Border Agency is unable to remove from the UK on human rights grounds is not readily available on our electronic system and could be obtained only by reviewing individual cases. Many factors will be taken into account when consideration is given as to whether an individual should be allowed to remain in the UK, including the immigration rules, the 1951 Refugee Convention and the Human Rights Act. These often 'overlap' and are not mutually exclusive. An individual may be granted permission to stay for reasons relating to more than one of these provisions.

Reflecting and recording all possible and multiple reasons in a static field is therefore very challenging. This would incur a disproportionate cost. Without this information we are unable to provide information on how many of the individuals have committed criminal offences while in the UK.

5 Sep 2011 : Column 236W

Deportation: EU Nationals

Andrew Percy: To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department how many citizens of each EU member state the UK Border Agency has removed in each of the last four years. [68024]

Damian Green: The following table shows the total number of removals and voluntary departures from the UK of European Union nationals from 2007 to 2010.

The Home Office publishes statistics on the number of persons removed or departed voluntarily from the UK on a quarterly and annual basis, which are available from the Library of the House and from the Home Office's Science, Research and Statistics web pages at:

http://homeoffice.gov.uk/science-research/research-statistics/migration/migration-statistics1/

Removals and voluntary departures (1, 2, 3 ) from the UK for nationals of the European Union, 2007-10
Number of departures (4)

2007 2008 2009 (5) 2010 (5)

Austria

10

5

5

5

Belgium

40

40

30

20

Bulgaria

25

20

35

50

Cyprus

10

5

(6)

5

Czech Republic

15

40

45

40

Denmark

5

5

10

5

Estonia

5

5

5

10

Finland

(7)

5

5

(6)

France

110

100

90

110

Germany

85

90

80

55

Greece

10

10

5

10

Hungary

10

15

20

30

Ireland

35

10

10

10

Italy

70

55

40

35

Latvia

35

20

40

55

Lithuania

80

100

125

180

Luxembourg

(7)

(6)

(7)

(7)

Malta

(6)

(6)

(6)

(6)

Netherlands

165

130

100

100

Poland

80

135

180

270

Portugal

65

70

95

85

Romania

200

185

245

315

Slovakia

25

25

25

40

Slovenia

5

(6)

5

5

Spain

30

20

20

25

Sweden

15

20

20

25

Total EU nationals

1,135

1,120

1,225

1,480

(1 )Figures rounded to the nearest 5. (2) Includes enforced removals, persons departing voluntarily after notifying the UK Border Agency of their intention to leave prior to their departure, persons leaving under Assisted Voluntary Return Programmes run by the International Organisation for Migration and persons who it has been established left the UK without informing the immigration authorities. (3) Figures include dependants. (4) Removals and voluntary departures recorded on the system as at the dates on which the data extracts were taken. (5) Provisional figures. Figures will under record due to data cleansing and data matching exercises that take place after the extracts are taken. (6) = 1 or 2. (7) = 0.