Home Department

Alcoholic Drinks: Prices

Diana Johnson: To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department by what date she expects to have implemented a minimum price for alcohol. [72989]

James Brokenshire: In January 2011 the Government announced their intention to ban the sale of alcohol below the cost of duty plus VAT. Subject to parliamentary procedures the ban will come into force on 6 April 2012. It will be a new condition of the Mandatory Code of Practice in the Licensing Act 2003. The policy will apply to all alcohol retailers in England and Wales.

Julian Sturdy: To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department what steps she is taking to (a) reduce binge drinking and (b) end the sale of alcohol at low cost. [73229]

James Brokenshire: There are a number of measures already in place to combat binge drinking. Among the measures introduced in the Mandatory Code of Practice of the Licensing Act 2003 is a ban on irresponsible promotions and a requirement that smaller measures of drinks are available. The Mandatory Code also requires that free tap water is provided on request to customers where reasonably available.

The Government are also bringing in a number of measures in the Police Reform and Social Responsibility Act to give local communities the tools and powers they need to tackle late night problems associated with alcohol.

In January 2011 the Government announced their intention to ban the sale of alcohol below the cost of duty plus VAT. The policy will apply to all alcohol retailers in England and Wales that sell alcohol for consumption on and off the premises.

27 Oct 2011 : Column 313W

Animal Experiments

Mr Virendra Sharma: To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department whether she plans to strengthen her Department's existing regulations when transposing European Directive 2010/63/EU on protection of animals used for scientific purposes into UK law; and if she will make a statement. [76952]

Lynne Featherstone: The principal objective for the transposition of European Directive 2010/63/EU on the protection of animals used for scientific purposes is to comply with UK Treaty obligations to transpose the provisions of the new directive into UK legislation fully and appropriately. Where this requires the strengthening of current legislation we will do so. Article 2 to the new directive allows member states to retain stricter national provisions in force on 9 November 2010.

The recent public consultation on the options for transposition of the new directive which closed on 5 September 2011 sought views on which measures should be retained in United Kingdom legislation using Article 2. We are now analysing the responses to the consultation and will announce decisions on options in due course.

Mr Bain: To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department what assessment she has made of the effects on the frequency of (a) inspections and (b) use of restrictions on the use of cats, dogs and horses for scientific experimentation of the transposition into UK Law of the EU Directive on the protection of animals used in scientific procedures. [76976]

Lynne Featherstone: The public consultation on the options for transposition of the European Directive 2010/63/EU on the protection of animals used for scientific purposes invited views on the system of inspection which would best meet UK needs and the absence of special protection for cats, dogs and equidae for scientific experimentation.

We are now analysing the responses to the public consultation on the options for transposition. This will include the frequency of inspections of establishments designated under the Animals (Scientific Procedures) Act 1986 and restrictions on the use of cats, dogs and horses for scientific experimentation. We will publish a summary report by the end of 2011.

Mr Sanders: To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department how the Government will be carrying out the thematic review process outlined in EU Directive 2010/63/EU; and when she expects the review of specific experiments involving animals with a view to replacement with non-animal methods to begin. [77049]

Lynne Featherstone: Article 58 of European Directive 2010/63/EU on the protection of animals used for scientific purposes requires the Commission to conduct periodic thematic reviews where appropriate of the replacement, refinement and reduction of the use of animals in procedures, paying specific attention to non-human primates, technological developments and new scientific and animal welfare knowledge. The Commission is to conduct these periodic thematic reviews in consultation with member states and other stakeholders.

27 Oct 2011 : Column 314W

We strongly support the requirement for periodic thematic reviews and the United Kingdom contribution to the review will be considered at the appropriate time when consulted by the Commission.

Counter-terrorism

Shabana Mahmood: To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department what recent discussions she has had with the Secretary of State for Communities and Local Government on delivery of the Prevent Strategy. [71366]

James Brokenshire: I have regular meetings with ministerial colleagues on a range of issues.

Counter-terrorism: Finance

Shabana Mahmood: To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department what funding was allocated to groups working to prevent right-wing extremism and terrorism in the financial year (a) 2010-11 and (b) 2011-12. [72822]

James Brokenshire: The new Prevent strategy published earlier this year addresses all forms of terrorism, including right wing terrorism. But it is clear that Prevent work must be targeted against those forms of terrorism assessed to pose the greatest risk to our national security. Currently, the greatest threat comes from al-Qaeda, and those they inspire.

The Home Office did not allocate funds in either of these financial years to any groups specifically to prevent right-wing terrorism or extremism. Some police forces may have directly engaged groups specifically to prevent right-wing extremism.

Crime: Disability

Chris Evans: To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department what steps the Government Equalities Office is taking to prevent disability hate crime. [75551]

Lynne Featherstone: Hate crime, including targeting a person because of their perceived disability, is wholly unacceptable. The Government have been clear that those who commit these sorts of crimes must be challenged and punished.

Legislation already provides the courts with powers to increase the sentence for any offence aggravated by hostility towards disability, under section 146 of the Criminal Justice Act 2003.

However, we are committed to doing more to support and protect victims. That is why the coalition's Programme for Government included a commitment to improve the recording of such crimes.

Working with the Association of Chief Police Officers and other partners, including disabled people's organisations, we are encouraging the reporting of all hate crime. This will give us a clearer picture of local patterns and trends in disability hate crime, helping the police to target their resources more effectively and ensure better protection for repeat and vulnerable victims.

The Equality and Human Rights Commission's Inquiry into disability-related harassment sets out a number of recommendations, and we will respond in due course.

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The Government are also considering the recommendations from the recent Equality and Human Rights Commission's Inquiry into disability-related harassment.

Drugs: Misuse

Paul Flynn: To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department what recent representations she has received on the effectiveness of the provisions of the Misuse of Drugs Act 1971; and what plans her Department has to draw up another drugs strategy following the drugs strategy it published in 2010. [72964]

James Brokenshire: The Secretary of State for the Home Department, my right hon. Friend the Member for Maidenhead (Mrs May), receives numerous correspondence on the Misuse of Drugs Act 1971. Drugs are illegal under the Act because they are harmful—they destroy lives and cause untold misery to families and communities.

The Government's 2010 Drug Strategy is much more ambitious in its approach to drugs under three overarching aims to reduce demand, restrict supply and build recovery in communities. We are committed to reviewing the strategy annually. The first review will be published in March 2012. The current strategy will continue until 2014-15.

Police: Bureaucracy

Stella Creasy: To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department if she will estimate the number of qualified police officers undertaking administrative duties in each London borough between September 2008 and September 2011. [76776]

Nick Herbert: The information requested is not collected centrally.

Police: Manpower

Mr Thomas: To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department how many (a) specialist domestic violence units and (b) full-time equivalent staff working in specialist domestic violence units there were in each region in (i) 2010-11 and (ii) 2011-12; and how many such (A) units and (B) staff were budgeted for in (1) 2012-13, (2) 2013-14 and (3) 2014-15; and if she will make a statement. [76453]

Lynne Featherstone [holding answer 24 October 2011]: The Home Office does not collect information on specialist domestic violence units.

Specialist domestic violence units are normally based within public protection units in police stations. However, it is for individual police forces to decide whether they have a unit and, if they do, that resources are allocated to it.

Police: Olympic Games 2012

Andrew Rosindell: To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department how many (a) police officers and (b) police community support officers she expects to be operating in London during the 2012 Olympic and Paralympic Games. [77075]

27 Oct 2011 : Column 316W

Nick Herbert: I understand from the Metropolitan Police Service that it estimates that a maximum of 9,000 police officers will be needed for Games-related duties in London on days of peak demand during the London 2012 Olympic and Paralympic Games. Police community support officers (PCSOs) will continue to work across London during the Games period.

The overall number of police officers and PCSOs active in London during the summer of 2012 is a matter for the Metropolitan Police Commissioner and the Commissioner for the City of London Police, and the relevant police authorities.

Rape: British Nationals Abroad

Jenny Willott: To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department (1) what information her Department holds on the average length of time taken for rape cases involving a British citizen in which the alleged offence took place outside the UK to reach a conclusion; [75363]

(2) how many files relating to rape cases (a) involving British citizens overseas and (b) in the UK have been lost by the Serious and Organised Crime Agency in each of the last five years; and if she will make a statement; [75210]

(3) what information her Department holds on the average length of time taken for the case file for rape cases involving a British citizen in which the alleged offence took place outside the UK to be passed to the other country's police authorities by Interpol in the UK; [75366]

(4) what information her Department holds on the average length of time taken for cases involving the alleged rape of a British citizen in (a) an EU country and (b) a country outside the EU to reach trial; [75384]

(5) what information her Department holds on the number of ongoing rape case files which have been lost by Interpol in the UK in each of the last five years; and if she will make a statement. [75414]

Lynne Featherstone [holding answers 17 and 18 October 2011]: The Serious Organised Crime Agency (SOCA) is not aware of any confirmed losses of rape case files by itself or by the Interpol Bureau within SOCA. There is one instance where the original case papers relating to the UK end of an investigation into a sexual offence, alleged to have occurred overseas against a British citizen, were not transferred to the relevant overseas authority. Duplicate case papers have been transferred to the relevant authority in the overseas jurisdiction.

An investigation, supervised by the Independent Police Complaints Commission, is currently under way into how this apparent failure occurred, including whether the case papers were transferred between the relevant agencies within the UK.

Since May 2011, UK police forces have been able to send “Transfer of Crime” material, including rape cases, directly to overseas partners on behalf of the Interpol Bureau. Prior to that, such material, initially processed by police forces, was sent through the Interpol Bureau in SOCA. Once received by SOCA cases were normally processed in less than a week. Allegations of rape would be treated as urgent.

27 Oct 2011 : Column 317W

The Home Office does not hold any information on the average length of time taken for cases involving the alleged rape of a British citizen in an EU country or in countries outside the EU to reach trial or a conclusion.

Terrorism

Andrew Rosindell: To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department how many people have been arrested for offences related to terrorism with a connection to (a) Islamic extremism, (b) far right extremism and (c) dissident Irish republican groups in each year since 1997. [74748]

James Brokenshire: The Home Office publishes statistics on arrests and outcomes under the Terrorism Act 2000 (Operation of Police Powers under the Terrorism Act 2000 and Subsequent Legislation: Arrests, Outcomes and Stops and Searches). The relevant statistical bulletin does not record statistics in the way requested, however, data in the current edition of the bulletin does show a breakdown of arrests into International, Domestic and Northern Ireland related terrorism. These data are only recorded from 2005-06 to 2010-11.

Table 1.07 of the current edition of the statistical bulletin (Operation of Police Powers under the Terrorism Act 2000 and Subsequent Legislation: Arrests, Outcomes and Stops and Searches—published on 13 October 2011) records these offences as follows:

Arrests and charges Arrested: Number or persons

Domestic(1)

138

Northern Ireland related(2)

47

International(3)

1,004

Not classified

32

Grand total

1,221

(1) Far right extremism is recorded in this category. (2) Dissident Republican Groups is recorded in this category. (3) Islamic terrorism is recorded in this category.

Offences under the domestic category refer to terrorist activity where there are no links to either Northern Ireland related or international terrorism.

Offences under the International category refer to activity by an individual or a group of individuals linked to terrorist groups that are based outside the UK who operate in and from third countries.

A link to the latest edition of this publication is provided as follows:

http://www.homeoffice.gov.uk/publications/science-research-statistics/research-statistics/counter-terrorism-statistics/hosb1511/hosb1511?view=Binary

International Development

Social Enterprises

Mr Thomas: To ask the Secretary of State for International Development what discussions he has had about promoting social enterprises within his Department's area of responsibility in each month since May 2010; and if he will make a statement. [77020]

Mr Andrew Mitchell: Information on a significant number of meetings between myself and external organisations, including charities, social enterprises and large, small and medium enterprises is available on the DFID website:

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http://www.dfid.gov.uk/About-us/Our-organisation/Ministers

This information covers meetings held since May 2010.

Zimbabwe

Andrew Rosindell: To ask the Secretary of State for International Development how many officials in his Department are based in Zimbabwe. [76740]

Mr O'Brien: The Department for International Development does not publish the numbers of staff in each country where we operate, as this may represent a security risk, especially to our staff serving in hostile environments or fragile states.

Zimbabwe: Overseas Aid

Andrew Rosindell: To ask the Secretary of State for International Development how much aid his Department expects to provide to Zimbabwe in 2011-12. [76741]

Mr Andrew Mitchell: By 2015, we plan to have created 125,000 new jobs, provided almost 1 million more people with access to clean water, helped 80,000 more children to complete five years of education and given over 700,000 more women access to family planning.

This assistance is delivered through trusted partners such as UNICEF and the African Development Bank; none of it passes through the Government of Zimbabwe.

The Department for International Development (DFID) plans to provide £80 million of assistance in 2011-12 which will support a range of development programmes that directly benefit the poorest and most vulnerable Zimbabweans.

Culture, Media and Sport

Arts: Broadband

Dan Jarvis: To ask the Secretary of State for Culture, Olympics, Media and Sport what assessment he has made of the potential contribution to the creative industries of a high-speed broadband infrastructure in the UK. [75743]

Mr Vaizey: There has not been a formal assessment by this Department of the potential contribution of high-speed broadband to the creative industries. However, it is the demand for rich content, delivered quickly and reliably, that is in part driving the uptake of faster broadband, and this will in turn enable the creative sectors to provide the content people want in ever more innovative and attractive ways.

The National Endowment for Science, Technology and the Arts estimates that the provision of universal super-fast broadband could directly create 600,000 new jobs, with £18 billion added to GDP. The indirect effects could be far larger. California is an economy approximately the size of the UK—it has been estimated that ultra-fast broadband installation there could add $366 billion to economic output and create two million new jobs.

27 Oct 2011 : Column 319W

Charitable Donations

Dan Jarvis: To ask the Secretary of State for Culture, Olympics, Media and Sport whether he has considered the merits of managing the distribution of donation funding from philanthropists to ensure an even distribution of funds across the regions of England. [77030]

Mr Vaizey: No. The entire ethos of philanthropy is built around the relationship between the donor and the cause or institution they support, it is not for Government to seek to mediate that relationship, nor the funds involved. We are instead working to strengthen fundraising skills and boost levels of giving across all regions of England. We have established a £100 million match funding programme to create endowments and cultivate philanthropy. We have introduced new tax measures to incentivise legacy giving and gifts of pre-eminent objects to public collections. We have strengthened public recognition for those who give, including through the honours system. We have arranged master classes across the country by world-leading fundraisers, and we have published a Giving White Paper. All of these measures will benefit the entire country.

Departmental Assets

Mr Thomas: To ask the Secretary of State for Culture, Olympics, Media and Sport what assets with a value of £250,000 or more his Department has bought since May 2010; for what purpose; and if he will make a statement. [77408]

John Penrose: Since May 2010, the Department has bought no fixed asset with a value of £250,000 or more.

Departmental Manpower

Stephen Hammond: To ask the Secretary of State for Culture, Olympics, Media and Sport how many civil servants were (a) directly and (b) otherwise employed by non-departmental public bodies for which his Department is responsible (i) in 2000, (ii) in 2005, (iii) in 2007, (iv) in 2010 and (v) on the most recent date for which figures are available. [76385]

John Penrose: The Department for Culture, Media and Sport (DCMS) has responsibility for 42 arm's length bodies (ALBs) that help deliver its strategic aims and objectives. The vast majority of those working for such organisations will be public servants rather than civil servants as they do not work directly for the Crown. However, there may be occasions where civil servants are loaned or seconded from their parent Department to work for an ALB for a limited period of time.

ALBs have authority to recruit according to their individual business requirements. As such, the Department does not hold information relating to the number of civil servants employed by each of its ALBs, and to provide it would incur disproportionate cost.

Regulation

Stephen Hammond: To ask the Secretary of State for Culture, Olympics, Media and Sport how many (a) statutory instruments, (b) ministerial orders and (c)

27 Oct 2011 : Column 320W

other pieces of secondary legislation were issued by his Department in (i) 1990, (ii) 1995, (iii) each year since 1999 and (iv) 2011 to date. [76455]

John Penrose: The number of statutory instruments issued by the Department in the years my hon. Friend has requested can be found in the following table.


Total number of statutory instruments

1990

(1)0

1995

16

1999

23

2000

19

2001

17

2002

31

2003

28

2004

32

2005

49

2006

58

2007

65

2008

25

2009

25

2010

24

2011

(2)25

(1 )Department formed in 1992. (2) To date.

No ministerial orders, or other pieces of secondary legislation, have been issued during the years my hon. Friend has requested.

Education

Dan Jarvis: To ask the Secretary of State for Culture, Olympics, Media and Sport what discussions he is having with the Secretary of State for Business, Innovation and Skills on the role of creative education in (a) colleges and (b) universities in the Government's skills strategy. [77044]

Mr Vaizey: The Secretary of State for Culture, Olympics, Media and Sport, my right hon. Friend the Member for South West Surrey (Mr Hunt), regularly meets with the Secretary of State for Business, Innovation and Skills, the right hon. Member for Twickenham (Vince Cable), to discuss cross-Departmental issues, including the role of creative education in colleges and universities in the Government's skills strategy.

Legal Opinion

Stephen Hammond: To ask the Secretary of State for Culture, Olympics, Media and Sport how many times his Department's legal section provided legal advice to Ministers in (a) 2007, (b) 2009, (c) 2010 and (d) the first six months of 2011. [76360]

John Penrose: The Department does not record the number of times the legal team provide advice to Ministers. Advice is provided by departmental legal advisers on an ongoing basis, as and when necessary.

Stephen Hammond: To ask the Secretary of State for Culture, Olympics, Media and Sport how many officials in his Department were working in its legal

27 Oct 2011 : Column 321W

section in June 2011; and how many staff were working in the legal departments of his Department's agencies and non-departmental bodies. [76392]

John Penrose: This Department is invoiced for solicitors from the Treasury Solicitor's Department. In June 2011 there were 20 permanent staff and one temp working in the legal section for this Department and its agency, the Royal Parks.

We do not hold this information for our arm's length bodies. I have therefore asked their chief executives to consider the question raised by my hon. Friend and to write to him direct. Copies of the replies will be placed in the Libraries of both Houses.

Lottery Funding: Liverpool

Steve Rotheram: To ask the Secretary of State for Culture, Olympics, Media and Sport if he will take steps to promote liaison between Liverpool Vision and the National Lottery Fund for the purposes of increasing funding for the creative and digital sector in Liverpool. [76910]

Mr Vaizey: Decisions on lottery funding are a matter for the individual lottery distributing bodies, acting independently of Government. Although I have no current plans to promote meetings of this kind, all lottery distributors engage with the sectors that they seek to fund, and provide opportunities for such engagement. According to the Department for Culture, Media and Sport's lottery grants database, which uses information provided by lottery distributors, and is searchable at:

http://www.lottery.culture.gov.uk

Liverpool has received £14 million in lottery funding in the last two years.

Museums and Galleries: Tees Valley

Tom Blenkinsop: To ask the Secretary of State for Culture, Olympics, Media and Sport whether he has considered taking steps to protect museums in Teesside that are under threat of closure arising from local authority spending reductions. [76340]

Mr Vaizey: Decisions on the funding of local authority museums are made at the discretion of local authorities, and central Government cannot prescribe how these decisions might be made. However, the Teesside museums receive funding through the Renaissance in the Regions programme, central Government's major funding programme for regional museums.

Until 2010-11, the Teesside museums received funding as part of the Hartlepool Museums' North East Renaissance Hub. This funding stream has now ended but the museums will continue to receive funding during 2011-12 as part of the transition to the new model of Renaissance funding which will come into place in April 2012.

From 2012-13 Renaissance funding will continue to contribute to Teesside museums through museum development support and national projects, and they will be eligible to apply for museum's strategic funds.

The Arts Council, in its museum development role, will work with local authorities to try and ensure people

27 Oct 2011 : Column 322W

in the Tees valley have access to great museums. In addition, the Arts Council will continue to fund Middlesbrough Institute of Modern Art as a National Portfolio Organisation.

Tourism: Manpower

Dan Jarvis: To ask the Secretary of State for Culture, Olympics, Media and Sport how many people were employed in the (a) creative industries, (b) tourism industry and (c) heritage industry on the most recent date for which figures are available. [77026]

Mr Vaizey: The Creative Industries Economic Estimates, December 2010, indicates that there are 1.3 million jobs in the creative industries and 2.3 million including other creative jobs in other industries:

http://www.dcms.gov.uk/images/research/CIEE_Full_Release_Dec2010.pdf

The latest Office for National Statistics figures show that tourism directly supports 1.74 million jobs:

http://www.ons.gov.uk/ons/rel/elmr/tourism-satellite-account/2008---the-economic-importance-of-tourism/index.html

English Heritage's publication "Heritage Counts":

http://hc.english-heritage.org.uk

states there are 9,500 people employed in the operation of historic sites and buildings (2009) and 957.5 full-time equivalent historic environment employees in local authorities in 2011. 195,000 jobs are supported by heritage based tourism, according to “Heritage Lottery Fund Investing in success: Heritage and the UK Tourism Economy”:

http://www.hlf.org.uk/aboutus/howwework/Documents/HLF_Tourism_Impact_single.pdf

UK Film Industry

Dan Jarvis: To ask the Secretary of State for Culture, Olympics, Media and Sport how many apprentices are working in the UK film industry. [77024]

Mr Vaizey: The Department does not hold this information, although we are aware of the successful apprenticeship scheme run by Pinewood Film studios. From statistics collated by the Department for Business, Innovation and Skills (BIS), we are aware that in 2009-10, 30 people started apprenticeships in the ‘Creative and Digital Media' apprenticeship framework. Apprenticeship data held by BIS is collected and reported by apprenticeship framework rather than sector.

Dan Jarvis: To ask the Secretary of State for Culture, Olympics, Media and Sport how many people were employed in the UK film industry in (a) 1997, (b) 2007 and (c) the most recent period for which figures are available. [77025]

Mr Vaizey: The British Film Institute (BFI) publishes the number of people employed in the UK film industry within its Statistical Yearbook. The most recent of which was published on 1 August 2011 and can be found at the following link:

http://www.bfi.org.uk/filmtvinfo/stats/BFI-Statistical-Yearbook-2011.pdf

27 Oct 2011 : Column 323W

According to the yearbook, the following numbers of people were employed in the UK film industry in (a) 1997, (b) 2007 and (c) 2010 (the most recent date for which figures are available).


Number employed

1997

38,592

2007

41,343

2010

48,487

Defence

Enterprise Zones

Graham Jones: To ask the Secretary of State for Defence what discussions (a) he and (b) his officials have had with their counterparts in the Department for Business, Innovation and Skills to discuss the enterprise zone bid for Lancashire; and when such discussions took place. [73793]

Peter Luff: Ministry of Defence officials had discussions with officials in other Government Departments—including the Department for Business, Innovation and Skills—on the proposal to establish an enterprise zone in Lancashire prior to its announcement in October this year.

Afghanistan: Peacekeeping Operations

Mr Carswell: To ask the Secretary of State for Defence how many helicopters have been damaged on landing in Afghanistan. [76328]

Peter Luff: Since 2006, 42 UK helicopters have been damaged on landing in Afghanistan. Information prior to 2006 was not recorded centrally and could be provided only at disproportionate cost. In all cases where aircraft suffer damage, the helicopter fleet is carefully managed to ensure that tasking continues to be met in accordance with operational priorities.

BAE Systems

Ian Austin: To ask the Secretary of State for Defence what discussions he has had with the Secretary of State for Business, Innovation and Skills on the effect on apprentices at BAE Systems of redundancies in that company. [73166]

Peter Luff: Ministry of Defence (MOD) Ministers and officials hold regular discussions with their counterparts in the Department for Business Innovation and Skills (BIS) on a range of issues, including on the defence industry. The details of commercial decisions and their impacts on specific groups of employees are matters for the companies concerned. MOD Ministers have discussed the assistance BIS might offer with their counterparts on a number of occasions, although the decisions are for BIS Ministers to determine.

Business Interests

Ian Austin: To ask the Secretary of State for Defence what steps his Department is taking to encourage tendering for his Department's contracts by manufacturers based in the UK. [73154]

27 Oct 2011 : Column 324W

Peter Luff: The Ministry of Defence (MOD)'s first responsibility when procuring equipment is to provide the armed forces with the capabilities they require in an affordable and sustainable way. This is best achieved through open competition on the global market.

Nevertheless, the MOD recognises that a vibrant and self sustaining UK-based Defence industry brings benefit both to the UK armed forces and the economy as a whole. We will publish a White Paper on technology, equipment, and support for UK defence and security later this year. This will set out the Government's approach on these issues, including building on progress already made at making defence and security opportunities more accessible to a wider range of UK suppliers, particularly small and medium-sized enterprises.

Procurement

Mr Thomas: To ask the Secretary of State for Defence how many contracts his Department has advertised on the Contracts Finder website in each month since May 2010; what the value was of such contracts; what proportion were awarded to (a) third sector organisations and (b) small businesses; and if he will make a statement. [75129]

Peter Luff: Contracts Finder went live on 1 January 2011 and the ability to advertise contract opportunities was added on 31 March 2011. Statistics for contracts advertised are available from 31 March 2011 onwards, and are given in the following table. Due to these being contract opportunities, values are expressed within ranges.

Number advertised

Sub Official Journal of the European Union (OJEU) contracts (£10,000 to £101,323) OJEU Opportunities (£101,323 to £400 million and above)

April

12

25

May

23

28

June

49

24

July

17

22

August

21

35

September

34

19

October

4

18

Since 1 January 2011 32 sub-OJEU contracts have been recorded as being awarded to Small to Medium Enterprises (SMEs). The award of contracts to third sector organisations is not captured.

The Ministry of Defence's OJEU contract opportunities are published in the Tenders Electronic Daily portal (the on-line version of Supplement S to the OJEU containing calls for competitions and award notices), which feeds into Contracts Finder. Tenders Electronic Daily does not capture whether contracts are awarded to third sector organisations or SMEs.

Cyber-Security

Mr Thomas: To ask the Secretary of State for Defence what steps his Department is taking to improve cyber-security in relation to his Department's estate; and if he will make a statement. [75128]

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Peter Luff: As we set out in the strategic defence and security review, we attach a high priority to the cyber-defence of our systems. Our forces depend on computer networks, both in the UK and on operations around the world, but our adversaries present an advanced and rapidly developing threat to these networks.

We have established a new global operations security control centre to co-ordinate cyber defence of our systems and we have commissioned a new monitoring system to detect cyber-attacks against our systems. In addition, we are establishing the Defence Cyber Operations Group (DCOG). The group will mainstream cyber security throughout the Ministry of Defence and ensure the coherent integration of cyber activities across the spectrum of Defence operations.

Horn of Africa: Piracy

Hugh Bayley: To ask the Secretary of State for Defence how much his Department has spent on anti-piracy measures off the Horn of Africa in each of the last three years; and what information his Department holds on spending by (a) NATO and (b) the EU in the same period. [76763]

Peter Luff: Anti-piracy measures off the Horn of Africa are among a number of concurrent tasks carried out by the Royal Navy and supporting assets. Expenditure incurred on counter-piracy measures is not identified separately.

The common costs (ie costs shared by NATO and EU members, which are additional to the national contribution to the operation) for anti-piracy measures off the Horn of Africa in the last three years for NATO and the EU are as follows:

NATO counter-piracy

Common cost (€ million)

2009

0.327

2010

0.568

2011

0.850

EU—Operation Atalanta

Common funding budget cost (€ million)

2009

8.3

2010

8.8

2011

7.8

Iraq: Peacekeeping Operations

Mrs Moon: To ask the Secretary of State for Defence how many maritime assets were used in Operation Kipion; and if he will make a statement. [75662]

Nick Harvey: As of 18 October 2011, the maritime assets deployed in support of Operation Kipion were as follows.

Type 23s

HMS Somerset

HMS St Albans

HMS Argyll

Mine Counter Measures Vessels (MCMV)

HMS Middleton

HMS Ramsey

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HMS Quorn

HMS Pembroke

Royal Fleet Auxiliaries (RFAs)

RFA Lyme Bay—Landing ship dock

RFA Fort Victoria—Replenishment ship

RFA Wave Knight—Fast Fleet Tanker

RFA Diligence—Forward Repair Ship

Survey Vessel

HMS Echo

The SSN(T) submarines are also deployed periodically in support of Operation Kipion.

Mrs Moon: To ask the Secretary of State for Defence how many maritime assets were utilised from each platform during Operation TELIC in each year between 2005 and 2010; and if he will make a statement. [75663]

Nick Harvey: The number of individual maritime assets, by platform, deployed in the Gulf region over the years 2005 to 2010 are given in the following table. The units would have had a number of tasks at different times including Operation TELIC, supporting our international partners as part of our contribution to Gulf security, and counter piracy activities.


2005 2006 2007 2008 2009 2010

Carrier

0

1

0

1

0

0

T42 Destroyer

2

1

1

2

0

0

T23 Frigate

3

5

4

8

7

6

T22 Frigate

2

0

2

3

2

2

MCMV(1)

0

3

3

5

5

4

LPH(2)

0

0

0

0

1

0

LPD(3)

1

1

0

0

1

0

Survey Vessel

1

0

0

1

0

0

RFA(4)—Supply Ship

0

0

l

1

0

1

RFA—Fast Fleet Tanker

1

1

1

2

3

1

RFA—Forward Repair

1

1

0

1

1

1

RFA—Landing Ship Dock

0

0

1

1

2

1

PCRF(5)

0

0

1

1

0

0

(1) Mine Counter Measure Vessel. (2) Landing Platform Helicopter. (3) Landing Platform Dock. (4) Royal Fleet Auxiliary. (5) Primary Casualty Receiving Facility.

Fleet submarines were also deployed periodically in the Gulf region.

Old Drill Hall

Mr Andrew Smith: To ask the Secretary of State for Defence pursuant to the answer of 19 July 2011, Official Report, column 868W, on Old Drill Hall, whether his Department had title to the Weymouth Drill Hall prior to its sale in 1994. [76410]

27 Oct 2011 : Column 327W

Mr Robathan: At the time of the sale it was understood that the Ministry of Defence (MOD) had title to the Old Drill Hall, Weymouth. The sale was registered by the Land Registry as in MOD ownership.

RAF Lossiemouth

Mike Crockart: To ask the Secretary of State for Defence pursuant to the answer of 18 October 2011, Official Report, column 878, on military bases, when he expects the more detailed planning for RAF Lossiemouth support for Typhoon operations to be complete. [76407]

Nick Harvey: The detailed planning for RAF Lossiemouth support for Typhoon operations is currently expected to be complete in 2012.

Syria: Military Aid

Caroline Lucas: To ask the Secretary of State for Defence whether the UK has provided any support to Syria in respect of (a) internal security training, (b) public order training and (c) sniper training since May 2010; and if he will make a statement. [76646]

Peter Luff: The UK has not provided any support to Syria in respect of internal security training, public order training or sniper training since May 2010.

Justice

Alternative Business Structures

Mr Raab: To ask the Secretary of State for Justice when he expects to lay before Parliament legislative proposals to designate the Solicitors Regulation Authority as a licensing authority for alternative business structures. [76955]

Mr Djanogly: The order to designate the Law Society as a licensing authority for alternative business structures can only be made once there is a body in place with the power to hear appeals against its licensing decisions. Subject to parliamentary approval of the draft order to establish the appeals mechanism, I expect the designation order to be laid in time for the Law Society (via its regulatory arm, the Solicitors Regulation Authority) to become a licensing authority by the new year.

Crime: Victims

Mr Crausby: To ask the Secretary of State for Justice what steps he is taking to improve services provided by the police for victims of crime. [71112]

Mr Blunt: The Government are determined to ensure that services for victims are effective, efficient and easily accessible and are currently undertaking a review of victims' services and compensation. This work includes looking at the effectiveness of the Victims Code, which applies to the police as well as to other criminal justice agencies. We will consult on our proposals later this year.

Despite substantial pressures on Government spending we have maintained funding of approximately £50 million to the victims’ voluntary sector this year.

27 Oct 2011 : Column 328W

Criminal Injuries Compensation

Andrew Jones: To ask the Secretary of State for Justice how much criminal injuries compensation was paid to convicted offenders in 2010-11. [68977]

Mr Djanogly: Out of a total of £271.6 million paid by the Criminal Injuries Compensation Authority in 2010-11, at least £15.2 million was paid to people with unspent convictions. These figures only reflect cases where CICA reduced the award due to unspent convictions, which the current compensation scheme says they must do. But there are cases still being considered under previous schemes that did not make such reductions compulsory, so the real figures are likely to be higher.

Interpreters

Sadiq Khan: To ask the Secretary of State for Justice what standards in respect of qualifications or experience of individuals providing interpretation services for his Department (a) are applied at present and (b) were applied in October 2010. [76819]

Mr Blunt: The qualifications and experience required for individuals providing interpreting services are the same now as they were in October 2010. That is, wherever possible, interpreters should be registered on the National Register for Public Service Interpreters (NRPSI). To gain registration, they must be able to demonstrate they are qualified in accordance with the entrance requirements of NRPSI.

Domestic Violence

Fiona Mactaggart: To ask the Secretary of State for Justice what definition of domestic violence his Department uses; and whether there are any qualifications of that definition in respect of particular services and processes for which his Department is responsible. [77011]

Mr Djanogly: As a member of the Inter-Ministerial Group on Violence Against Women and Girls, the Ministry of Justice supports the general definition of domestic violence as agreed by that group in 2004, which is:

“any incident of threatening behaviour, violence or abuse (psychological, physical, sexual, financial or emotional) between adults who are or have been intimate partners or family members, regardless of gender or sexuality.”

This current cross-government definition is also quoted in the guidance manual for Specialist Domestic Violence Court systems for partners, including the independent domestic violence advisers, to determine how they will identify domestic violence cases.

Part 4 of the Family Law Act 1996 which provides for civil remedies against domestic violence, does not specifically use the term “domestic violence”. Under that legislation, orders can be obtained to protect a person “associated” with the alleged perpetrator from “molestation”. Molestation is not defined but covers a wide range of conduct including but not limited to physical violence (for example, it would include pestering and harassing a person). “Associated persons” is defined in the Act and covers a very wide range of relationships, including “intimate personal relationships” of significant duration.

27 Oct 2011 : Column 329W

Similarly, the pre-application protocol for family mediation information and assessment meetings which came into effect on 6 April simply sets out that if a client has made an allegation of domestic violence (ie they have been subjected to any incident of threatening behaviour, violence or abuse be it psychological, physical, sexual, financial or emotional) against another party and this has resulted in a police investigation or the issuing of civil proceedings for the protection of any party within the last 12 months then that client will be exempt from the need to attend a mediation information and assessment meeting.

The Legal Aid, Sentencing and Punishment of Offenders Bill employs a broad definition of "abuse" in providing for legal aid to be available for private family law cases involving domestic violence or child abuse, and for cases relating to abuse of a child or vulnerable adult. The definition in the Bill would not exclude from scope any of the types of abuse covered by the general definition of domestic violence agreed by the Inter-Ministerial Group. To avoid creating an incentive for false allegations, applicants for funding will be required to provide objective evidence of domestic violence, as set out in the Government's response to the consultation “Proposals for the reform of legal aid in England and Wales”. The circumstances that would be accepted as evidence of abuse will turn on the application by the courts, prosecutors and other agencies of their existing criteria.

The National Offender Management Service (NOMS) domestic violence abuse programmes are designed for adult male offenders who are or were in intimate heterosexual relationships when the violence or abuse occurred. "Violence" in this context means any incident of threatening behaviour, violence or abuse (psychological, physical, sexual, financial or emotional) and in this context an intimate relationship means a sexual relationship.

Insolvency: EU Action

John Glen: To ask the Secretary of State for Justice if he will assess the merits of amending the proposed EU Regulation creating a European Account Preservation Order to (a) widen the exemption granted to proceedings relating to the winding-up of insolvent companies to include businesses in any collective insolvency proceeding as set out in the European Insolvency Regulation, (b) ensure that the provision of a security deposit by the claimant is a requirement in every case rather than a matter left to the discretion of the granting court and (c) enable a business subject to a European Account Preservation Order to challenge the order in a court in their own jurisdiction rather than applying to the granting court. [76447]

Mr Kenneth Clarke: The Government's decision about whether to opt in to this proposal will be announced shortly. Whether or not the Government decide to opt in at this point the UK will still be active in the negotiations. The Government do intend to seek the exemption of businesses in any collective insolvency proceeding as set out in the EU Insolvency Regulation; they believe that the discretion of courts with regard to security should be reduced and wish to align this provision more with the current procedure in England and Wales where there is a presumption of the provision of security unless a court considers in the circumstances of the case

27 Oct 2011 : Column 330W

that it is inappropriate; and they will also seek to widen the category of defendants who can challenge orders in a court in their own jurisdiction.

John Glen: To ask the Secretary of State for Justice what assessment he has made of the likely effects of implementation of the proposed EU Regulation creating a European Account Preservation Order on the UK's business rescue culture. [76449]

Mr Kenneth Clarke: The Government are aware from the results of their recent consultation that the Commission's proposal could, if implemented in their current form, have a significant effect on those companies in the process of business rescue. Measures to improve the protection of companies in financial distress will be one of the Government's priorities during the negotiations.

Kennet Prison

Bill Esterson: To ask the Secretary of State for Justice whether he plans to convert HMP Kennet to a category D prison. [76912]

Mr Blunt: NOMS are committed to making the most effective use of the estate to support prisoners' needs and are continuing to develop our approach to managing the prison population to deliver this. Any decisions on the future role of establishments, including Kennet, will be taken with regard to this.

Offenders: Rehabilitation

Sadiq Khan: To ask the Secretary of State for Justice (1) what targets for reducing re-offending will result in a payment to investors or operators in each of the payment by results pilots in operation; [76816]

(2) what outcome is being measured in each of the payment by results pilots in operation. [76817]

Mr Blunt: The information is as follows:

(i) For the Social Impact Bond at HMP Peterborough, the Government, together with the Big Lottery Fund, will pay for results if the frequency of reconviction events for <12 month sentenced prisoners released from HMP Peterborough falls by 10% in one of the three 1,000-offender cohorts, or by an aggregate of 7.5% across the three cohorts together, compared to matched control groups. If these thresholds are not achieved, no payment will be made. The frequency of reconviction events is the number of times an offender is convicted at court during the 12 months following release from prison.

(ii) The success criteria adopted for the pilot at HMP Doncaster is a binary measure based on offenders' proven reoffending. Reoffending will be measured using the reconviction rate, which is defined as the percentage of offenders that commit an offence during the 12 months following discharge from HMP Doncaster, and which is proved by a court conviction during this period or in the subsequent six months.

Once the results from each year of the pilot are available, Serco will only be able to retain 100% of the annual contract value if the one-year reconviction rate for that year has been reduced by at least five percentage points against an agreed baseline, determined by the 2009 reoffending data for the prison.

If this target is not met, 10% of the contract price will be reclaimed by the Ministry of Justice. If the target is exceeded, Serco will receive an additional payment for each extra percentage point reduction, up to a maximum reduction of 10 percentage points.

27 Oct 2011 : Column 331W

(iii) We are running Local Justice Reinvestment pilots in Greater Manchester and in five London boroughs for two years—these pilots are also referred to as Local Approaches to Payment by Results. No payments will be made to the test areas unless demand on the justice system, measured through Ministry of Justice agencies, falls by 5% or 10% against baseline for adult and youth systems respectively. The reduction in demand will be calculated according to a series of demand metrics at the end of each year of the two-year pilot, and used to determine any payments to the pilot areas.

Police Stations: Prison Accommodation

Sadiq Khan: To ask the Secretary of State for Justice (1) how many (a) police station and (b) court cells meet minimum health and safety standards for use during Operation Safeguard; [76820]

(2) what mechanisms are in place to ensure that police station and court cell usage during Operation Safeguard meets health and safety standards; [76821]

Mr Blunt: Contingency accommodation in police or court cells is required when the size or distribution of the prison population is such that it can no longer be managed within available prison capacity. There are no plans to activate these contingencies, but in the event that this accommodation was required, all cells would be required to meet minimum health and safety standards. The providers of the accommodation would be responsible for local operating procedures to maintain these cells at a level meeting health and safety standards.

Prison: Probation

Ian Lavery: To ask the Secretary of State for Justice pursuant to the written ministerial statement of 13 July 2011, Official Report, column 31WS, on prison and probation services, what the estimated cost is of the market testing process for each of the nine prisons selected for market testing; and if he will make a statement. [69138]

Mr Blunt: It is not possible to provide the information requested at this time as the detailed costs are dependent upon the Procurement Strategy which is yet to be finalised. Our financial planning is based on the last phase of prison competitions. We estimate that it will cost £2.86 million to compete HMP Birmingham, HMP Buckley Hall and HMP Doncaster, with a financial benefit to the public of £216 million over the 15 year life of the contracts.

Prisoners: Pay

Alex Cunningham: To ask the Secretary of State for Justice whether the process of allocating the levy on prisoner's earnings to Victim Support complied with EU regulations on commissioning. [76619]

Mr Blunt: Yes.

Prisons

Bill Esterson: To ask the Secretary of State for Justice how many prisoners convicted of (a) murder and (b) rape are housed in category D prisons; and whether he plans to increase the number of such prisoners in category D prisons. [76913]

27 Oct 2011 : Column 332W

Mr Blunt: As at 30 June 2011, the most recent available data, there were (a) 332 and (b) 59 prisoners under sentence for murder and rape respectively in category D prisons in England and Wales. These figures include those held in open prisons/YOIs and the relevant parts of multi-site establishments. It does not include those held in semi-open prisons or in small (under 50 place) open units at closed prisons.

The numbers of such prisoners held in category D/open conditions will depend on how many of those prisoners pass the necessary robust risk assessment and the availability of spaces in the open prison estate at any one time.

All murderers and many serious sexual offenders will be serving indeterminate sentences. Depending on the minimum sentence or “tariff” and the risk they pose, such prisoners, move through their sentence via a series of progressive transfers into lower security establishments in the closed prison estate. The decision to transfer indeterminate sentenced prisoners (ISPs) to open conditions is a categorisation decision which is a matter for the Secretary of State for Justice. The Secretary of State may take this decision after seeking advice from the Parole Board or executively where the prisoners have demonstrated exceptional progress in closed conditions.

Indeterminate sentence prisoners are normally considered for recategorisation to open conditions no earlier than three years before the end of their tariff.

Moving indeterminate sentence prisoners to open conditions is an important part of the offender's rehabilitation. It tests their suitability for eventual release whilst still maintaining many of the restrictions of a closed prison. Should the offender's behaviour in open conditions give rise to concerns, he/she can be returned to closed conditions.

The National Offender Management Service (NOMS) has recently implemented measures to reduce delays in the process of moving indeterminate sentence prisoners to open conditions where such a move has already been approved by the Secretary of State.

These figures have been drawn from administrative IT systems which, as with any large scale recording system, are subject to possible errors with data entry and processing.

Probation: Manpower

Sadiq Khan: To ask the Secretary of State for Justice (1) how many qualified assistant chief probation officers were employed in each probation trust (a) on the most recent date for which figures are available, (b) in 2008-09, (c) in 2009-10 and (d) in 2010-11; [76831]

(2) how many administrative and clerical staff were employed in each probation trust (a) on the most recent date for which figures are available, (b) in 2008-09, (c) in 2009-10 and (d) in 2010-11; [76832]

(3) how many qualified (a) probation officers and (b) probation service officers were employed in each probation trust on the most recent date for which figures are available. [76834]

Mr Blunt: The figures requested are provided in the following tables.

Figures are not available on the number of qualified probation officers performing an assistant chief officer

27 Oct 2011 : Column 333W

role. Figures provided for assistant chief officers therefore relate to all assistant chief officers.

All probation areas became probation trusts by 1 April 2010; this included a number of areas merging to become trusts. Two tables have therefore been provided that show snapshots of staff in post before and after the mergers. Surrey and Sussex submitted merged data one month before their merger; figures provided for them for 2009-10 are therefore merged.

27 Oct 2011 : Column 334W

Data were unavailable for some areas/trusts within the periods in question due to local technical/staffing issues. Where there are missing data, the latest available figures they submitted at that point in time have been included within the relevant year. This is applicable to Cheshire (September 2008 figures included within the 2008-09 figures); West Mercia (November 2009 figures included within the 2009-10 figures); and Derbyshire (March 2011 figures included within the 2011-12 figures).

Staff in post 2008-09 and 2009-10 (pre-area mergers)
  Assistant chief officers Administrative and clerical staff Probation officers Probation services officers
Trust 2008-09 2009-10 2008-09 2009-10 2008-09 2009-10 2008-09 2009-10

Avon and Somerset

5.90

7.90

125.7

122.30

178.2

163.3

157.1

152.30

Bedfordshire

5.00

3.00

36.57

35.95

63.09

61.04

44.88

47.47

Cambridgeshire

5.00

4.00

58.39

49.15

105.2

105

56.47

54.88

Cheshire

6.80

6.80

87.03

80.41

115.02

111.49

118.03

108.99

Cumbria

3.00

2.00

42.31

39.96

60.1

61.9

41.1

40.10

Derbyshire

4.00

4.00

107.4

88.90

138.8

115.3

130.4

113.40

Devon and Cornwall

6.10

4.00

114.01

92.52

193.42

179.57

88.06

87.19

Dorset

3.00

2.90

53.5

49.20

70.7

70.6

79.5

74.00

Durham

4.68

3.68

54.96

50.79

105.4

107.1

83.21

86.21

Dyfed-Powys

0.00

0.00

49.79

43.09

46.9

43.9

57.63

44.62

Essex

9.80

8.00

121.34

120.62

106.05

101.3

207.92

205.81

Gloucestershire

5.36

3.85

50.29

53.02

50.9

52.11

40.15

32.40

Greater Manchester

14.00

18.00

316.02

327.13

480.56

450.56

286.38

258.88

Gwent

4.00

5.00

67.48

66.73

89.44

85.94

62.7

61.73

Hampshire

0.00

0.00

149.54

129.54

191.1

196.68

188.19

172.44

Hertfordshire

6.00

4.00

58.25

52.89

82.89

79.39

86.7

78.69

Humberside

7.41

5.81

120.48

114.22

158.84

152.02

126.8

111.90

Kent

6.00

5.00

105.21

102.05

161.26

141.72

142.18

101.29

Lancashire

6.00

2.00

113.46

110.14

236.8

219.83

132.14

109.63

Leicestershire

9.02

7.00

109.3

105.75

157.34

158.27

186.37

173.19

Lincolnshire

5.00

4.00

61.88

51.41

72.08

64.88

66.02

66.55

London

35.00

45.00

646.83

1058.09

983.06

1017.37

864.19

329.12

Merseyside

0.00

8.00

172.45

179.76

257.57

265.51

223.26

192.55

Norfolk

4.00

3.00

35.75

31.96

93.05

86.16

138.93

123.40

North Wales

3.00

3.00

62.89

60.31

80.22

90.23

50.86

50.44

North Yorkshire

4.00

4.00

55.81

43.19

79.95

241.03

68.35

39.71

Northamptonshire

4.00

5.00

49.96

47.64

83.32

80.4

96.83

93.38

Northumbria

13.00

13.00

142.76

128.09

270.57

72.15

179.29

179.34

Nottinghamshire

0.00

5.00

155.06

139.57

177.28

174.27

116.51

108.48

South Wales

1.00

3.00

146.65

130.33

197.55

161.79

177.54

160.04

South Yorkshire

10.80

11.00

128.78

129.60

224.13

202.34

182.84

176.14

Staffordshire

0.00

0.00

132.35

113.87

158.5

115.34

91.64

71.44

Suffolk

5.75

4.75

39.83

34.66

91.35

85.29

71.58

67.63

Surrey

3.43

72.38

71.24

84.35

Surrey and Sussex (merged data)

8.80

143.20

211.51

100.73

Sussex

5.80

83.9

146.6

123.69

Teesside

4.00

4.00

62.4

60.83

128.08

122.99

98.07

81.60

Thames Valley

6.00

6.00

161.24

156.93

218.9

210.73

253.94

214.41

Warwickshire

6.00

6.00

31.11

29.57

61.24

61.05

38.76

44.33

West Midlands

16.60

18.61

444.72

428.49

467.59

135.46

415.99

394.74

West Mercia

6.00

6.00

103.18

107.37

138.22

436.6

104.16

92.58

West Yorkshire

14.00

8.00

321.3

291.02

359.29

341.3

297.42

287.72

Wiltshire

4.60

3.49

47.81

43.35

62.22

53.01

44.09

40.07

Total

263.05

266.59

5100.07

5243.60

7214.02

6886.43

6104.22

5029.52

27 Oct 2011 : Column 335W

27 Oct 2011 : Column 336W

Staff in post 2010-11 and 2011-12 (post-area mergers)
  Assistant Chief Officers Administrative and clerical staff Probation officers Probation services officers
Trust 2010 - 11 2011 - 12 2010 - 11 2011 - 12 2010 - 11 2011 - 12 2010 - 11 2011 - 12

Avon and Somerset

8.90

8.90

112.50

116.20

155.60

149.60

160.20

163.30

Bedfordshire

5.00

5.00

35.37

44.33

55.55

53.85

48.89

50.34

Cambridgeshire

4.60

5.00

48.88

46.90

109.86

107.20

54.61

54.40

Cheshire

6.80

6.80

74.91

76.17

116.12

116.55

90.28

88.89

Cumbria

2.00

3.00

40.55

41.55

57.90

56.30

37.30

46.91

Derbyshire

4.00

4.00

73.20

73.20

109.30

109.30

113.50

113.50

Devon and Cornwall

4.00

4.00

85.11

86.13

171.35

131.29

80.19

116.82

Dorset

3.00

4.00

48.60

44.80

66.70

61.30

72.00

71.00

Durham Tees Valley

8.37

8.37

95.89

93.81

219.30

215.54

163.28

162.62

Essex

8.00

8.00

132.42

129.71

104.90

103.60

202.86

197.55

Gloucestershire

1.85

1.85

42.43

43.69

48.53

47.53

28.55

27.94

Greater Manchester

16.00

14.00

284.20

276.13

440.46

434.05

224.48

225.72

Hampshire

0.00

0.00

117.51

130.63

188.41

194.20

164.49

168.12

Hertfordshire

5.00

5.00

50.98

55.60

78.68

75.58

84.26

80.54

Humberside

3.00

3.00

102.44

96.84

149.40

140.70

106.18

100.12

Kent

4.40

5.40

104.19

104.70

138.48

138.19

103.02

131.23

Lancashire

6.00

6.00

105.51

103.81

221.21

218.25

112.05

114.86

Leicestershire

7.60

7.60

98.37

95.59

148.74

147.53

170.92

167.51

Lincolnshire

5.00

5.00

50.21

48.40

68.63

65.97

63.49

61.80

London

44.00

44.80

1061.94

1060.29

1006.01

989.64

367.24

342.99

Merseyside

8.00

7.00

169.35

168.77

261.13

258.15

192.53

190.55

Norfolk and Suffolk

6.75

6.00

97.69

95.75

169.51

168.86

149.24

151.13

Northamptonshire

3.00

3.00

45.30

45.91

86.16

83.46

90.39

93.30

Northumbria

11.91

11.91

134.63

136.07

228.33

231.43

168.19

167.69

Nottinghamshire

6.03

6.00

122.54

124.43

168.23

170.01

115.91

117.19

South Yorkshire

11.99

10.99

73.10

71.02

248.26

240.04

171.46

166.66

Staffordshire and West Midlands

18.11

16.11

530.39

521.23

561.00

556.21

470.09

470.06

Surrey and Sussex

7.30

7.50

146.92

151.02

202.35

203.53

100.00

106.11

Thames Valley

5.00

5.00

148.03

147.84

207.98

203.41

199.96

198.06

Wales

13.00

12.00

268.64

262.53

369.16

365.30

304.74

305.07

Warwickshire

4.00

4.00

32.58

33.12

59.52

59.52

41.46

41.81

West Mercia

4.00

4.00

95.82

95.31

118.97

116.41

93.39

91.85

West Yorkshire

7.00

6.88

316.82

316.77

326.67

315.35

306.50

283.88

Wiltshire

3.49

3.49

47.82

47.62

52.45

52.39

27.06

27.20

York and North Yorkshire

4.00

4.00

55.70

53.53

79.65

76.76

59.13

58.74

Total

261.10

257.60

5050.54

5039.40

6794.50

6657.00

4937.84

4955.46