St Albans

Stevenage

Stratford

Stroud

Sunderland

Thames

Tower Bridge

15 Dec 2011 : Column 881W

Uxbridge

Vale Royal

Wakefield

Walsall

Waltham Forest

Warley

Welshpool

West London

Wimbledon

Wolverhampton

Wrexham

Crown court

Inner London CC

Wood Green CC

Manchester CC

Birmingham CC

Wolverhampton CC

Nottingham CC

Caernarfon CC

Newcastle CC

Preston CC

Reading CC

Chester CC

Mold CC

St Albans CC

Coventry CC

Colchester CC

Great Grimsby CC

Cardiff CC

Note:

This list has been compiled from manual returns from the courts as reported to Justice Statistics Analytical Service.

Priti Patel: To ask the Secretary of State for Justice what estimate he has made of the costs to the courts of processing cases concerning people involved in the public disorder of August 2011. [86309]

Mr Djanogly: These cases have been mainly accommodated within the normal sittings of the magistrates and Crown courts with extra cost primarily attributed to the operating of some 24 hour courts in the first days of the disorder and having other courts on stand-by at the time of the public disorder. The most recent assessment of this marginal cost to Her Majesty's Courts and Tribunals Service is £100,000.

We are not able to assign an accurate cost to processing these cases as cases are still progressing through the courts and there are likely to be large differences in costs of individual cases in terms of numbers and lengths of hearings. For example there may be one where a guilty plea was entered and the offender sentenced at the first hearing in the magistrates court or a case that proceeds to trial before a jury in the Crown court.

County Courts

Mr Slaughter: To ask the Secretary of State for Justice when he had expected to publish the Government's response to the consultation on solving disputes in the county courts; for what reasons publication of the Government's response has been

15 Dec 2011 : Column 882W

delayed; and when he expects to publish the Government's response. [86727]

Mr Djanogly: I refer the hon. Member to my previous answer given on 6 December 2011, Official Report, column 190W. The Government expect the consultation response to be published in the new year. The response was initially scheduled for publication in October but this was postponed due to ongoing discussions within Government.

Mr Slaughter: To ask the Secretary of State for Justice which organisations his Department had discussions with on the consultation on solving disputes in the county courts (a) before and (b) after the consultation closed; and how many submissions to the consultation were received. [86728]

Mr Djanogly: I refer the hon. Member to my previous answer given on 6 December 2011, Official Report, column 190W. The Department received 319 responses to the consultation. The Department has engaged in discussions with the following organisations during the course of this year:

Association of British Insurers

Civil Mediation Council

Forum of Insurance Lawyers

Association of Personal Injury Lawyers

Motor Accident Solicitors Society

The Law Society

The British Bankers Association

Citizens Advice

Her Majesties’ Association of District Judges

R3 (Association of Business Recovery Professionals)

Civil Courts Users Association

Office of Fair Trade

Shergroup

The Land Registry

Centre for Peaceful Solutions & Brent Mediation Centre

Centre for Effective Dispute Resolution

Law Works Mediation

National Health Service Litigation Authority

Medical Protection Society

Weightmans Solicitors

Departmental Pay

Mr Thomas: To ask the Secretary of State for Justice whether any senior staff in (a) his Department and (b) its executive agencies and non-departmental public bodies are paid by means of payments to a limited company in lieu of a salary; and if he will publish his policy on such payments. [85074]

Mr Kenneth Clarke: The Ministry of Justice uses external resources in order to meet skills, capacity and capability shortages. Contractors and interims can be deployed in temporary senior management positions when it has been established that there is no suitable internal resource available. When doing so the Ministry ensures that it receives value for money and complies with procurement legislation, HM Treasury's rules and Cabinet Office Efficiency and Reform Group (ERG) requirements.

15 Dec 2011 : Column 883W

The process for procurement of contractors and interims is via a single managed service provider, Capita Resourcing Limited. Payments are made to this service provider. All resource requests are raised directly with Capita via their online recruitment system called ‘TalentLink’. Capita then act as the single point of contact for the end to end process for handling the contractor procurement. In addition, Capita manage all contractual and second tier supplier relationships, thus achieving cost savings and time-efficiencies.

Within the Ministry of Justice there are four senior managers (senior civil servants) engaged on an interim basis through Capita. Within its executive agencies and non-departmental public bodies, there is currently one senior manager engaged on an interim basis through Capita.

Market Testing Evaluation Panels

Kelvin Hopkins: To ask the Secretary of State for Justice (1) what his policy is on the level of profit margin market testing evaluation panels in his Department should allow for private bidders; [86515]

(2) whether his Department's market testing evaluation panels seek information on the profit margins anticipated by private bidders. [86516]

Mr Kenneth Clarke: In running offender services competitions, evaluation panels seek to ensure that bids from potential providers from all sectors will deliver the standards of safety, decency and security set out in the relevant NOMS specifications for that service. Panels also evaluate the cost effectiveness and operational viability of bids in order to ensure that the desired outcomes can be delivered. Bidders were requested for profit as a percentage of their total operating cost for the purposes of the Prisons Competition phase l awarded in March 2010.

Members: Correspondence

Sir Gerald Kaufman: To ask the Secretary of State for Justice when he plans to answer the letter from the right hon. Member for Manchester, Gorton of 26 October 2011 with regard to Mrs M Fallows. [85148]

Mr Kenneth Clarke: I have now replied.

Personal Injury

Mr Slaughter: To ask the Secretary of State for Justice for what reasons the round table consultation meeting on matters relating to personal injury was postponed; and when he expects the round table to be held. [86711]

Mr Djanogly: I refer the hon. Member to my previous answer given on 6 December 2011, Official Report, column 194W. The roundtable discussion was postponed as the publication of the Government's response to ‘Solving Disputes in the County Courts’ has been delayed. The meeting will be rescheduled for the new year once the consultation response has been published.

15 Dec 2011 : Column 884W

Prisoners' Transfers

Kelvin Hopkins: To ask the Secretary of State for Justice which companies hold contracts with (a) his Department and (b) the National Offender Management Service for escorting prisoners; and how much each such company has received from his Department in each of the last three years. [86602]

Mr Kenneth Clarke: All the National Offender Management Service (NOMS) requirements for escorting prisoners are now delivered through the Prison Escort and Custody Services (PECS) contracts.

The latest PECS contracts were awarded in March 2011 by the MoJ to Serco Wincanton and GEOAmey PECS Ltd. Prior to 29 August 2011 NOMS did receive a separate Inter Prison Transfer (IPT) service which was provided nationally by G4S Care and Justice as well. As part of the improvements and efficiencies introduced by the latest PECS contracts IPT was integrated in to a single PECS service requirement. Consequently, the following data include reference to both PECS and IPT.

All the financial information requested is provided in the following table, with the new PECS contracts is shown separately, and is based on the MoJ financial year which runs from April to March each year.

Financial year Service period Service Company Contract spend (£)

2011-12

29 August 2011 to 30 November 2011

PECS (new)

GEOAmey PECS Ltd

27,925,624

2011-12

29 August 2011 to 30 November 2011

PECS (new)

Serco Wincanton

7,485,730

2011-12

1 April 2011 to 28 August 2011

PECS

Serco

20,366,242

2011-12

1 April 2011 to 28 August 2011

IPT and PECS

G4S (inc. IPT)

31,098,423

2011-12

1 April 2011 to 28 August 2011

PECS

Reliance

15,804,567

2010-11

1 April 2010 to 31 March 2011

PECS

Serco

49,720,339

2010-11

1 April 2010 to 31 March 2011

IPT and PECS

G4S (inc. IPT)

74,947,549

2010-11

1 April 2010 to 31 March 2011

PECS

Reliance

38,800,074

2009-10

1 April 2009 to 31 March 2010

PECS

Serco

48,527,479

2009-10

1 April 2009 to 31 March 2010

IPT and PECS

G4S (inc. IPT)

74,126,719

2009-10

1 April 2009 to 31 March 2010

PECS

Reliance

38,758,920

2008-09

1 April 2008 to 31 March 2009

PECS

Serco

45,774,178

2008-09

1 April 2008 to 31 March 2009

IPT and PECS

G4S (inc. IPT)

72,528,513

2008-09

1 April 2008 to 31 March 2009

PECS

Reliance

39,936,130

Prisons: Public Sector

John McDonnell: To ask the Secretary of State for Justice for what reasons the public sector bid to operate HM Prison Featherstone 2 was unsuccessful. [86289]

Mr Kenneth Clarke: The winning bidder (G4S Care and Justice Services (UK) Limited) submitted a more economically advantageous bid overall than the bid submitted by the public sector. In particular, the winning

15 Dec 2011 : Column 885W

bidder scored higher overall in relation to non-price criteria, and submitted a lower priced bid over the duration of the contract.

Probation

Mr Jim Cunningham: To ask the Secretary of State for Justice what steps he is taking to ensure that his forthcoming proposals for reform of the probation service do not place the public at risk. [86623]

Mr Blunt: The first stage of our work to look at the future shape of probation services in England and Wales is nearing completion. Throughout our work safeguarding public protection has been one of the key criteria when considering any possible reforms.

We expect to announce our emerging findings early in the new year and will then consult widely.

Work Capability Assessment: Appeals

Tom Greatrex: To ask the Secretary of State for Justice what estimate he has made of the potential cost to the public purse of the introduction of a six day week for HM Courts and Tribunals Service to hear appeals on decisions of the work capability assessment. [86847]

Mr Djanogly: : Her Majesty's Courts and Tribunals Service (HMCTS) hears appeals against Department for Work and Pensions decisions on entitlement to employment and support allowance (ESA) (decisions in which the work capability assessment is a key factor) rather than appeals against work capability assessment decisions themselves.

Saturday sittings are one of a number of measures taken to increase the capacity of the Social Security and Child Support (SSCS) Tribunal in response to the significant and unforecast increase in appeals. Appellants are asked whether they are willing to attend a hearing on a Saturday before their case is listed and the hearing will proceed exactly as it would on a weekday.

Saturday sittings hear a mixture of case types which prevents analysis specifically for ESA cases. The use of Saturday sittings is at the discretion of local managers and judiciary and therefore a specific budget has not been set aside for it. Between April and October 2011 379 sessions were held on a Saturday, which disposed of 1,848 cases. Based on the average cost of an SSCS appeal in 2010-11 of £239 the estimated total cost of these sittings is £0.4 million, although the actual cost of an appeal may be slightly higher on a Saturday as some administrative staff involved will receive overtime payments.

Total disposals by the SSCS Tribunal in the period between April and October 2011 were 21% up on the same period in 2010, and 66% higher than in the same seven months in 2009. In each of the last 12 months more ESA appeals have been disposed of than were received.

Written Questions: Government Responses

Mr Slaughter: To ask the Secretary of State for Justice when he expects to provide a substantive reply to Question 84642 tabled on 29 November 2011 for named day answer on 5 December 2011. [86706]

Mr Djanogly: I have now replied to the hon. Member's question.

15 Dec 2011 : Column 886W

Home Department

Asylum

Helen Jones: To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department what estimate she has made of the backlog of cases in the UK Border Agency, broken down by case type and the number of cases in each category. [79780]

Damian Green: The current number of work in progress cases in the UK Border Agency is shown as follows:


Number

Temporary Migration(1, 5, 6)

42,800

Permanent Migration(1, 5, 6)

53,000

Asylum(2, 5)

37,900

Other(3, 4, 5, 6)

16,400

The number of applications over the last six months were:


Number

Temporary Migration(5, 6)

105,700

Permanent Migration(5, 6)

147,300

Asylum(5, 7)

9,900

(1) Figures were produced on 4 November 2011. (2) Asylum cases also known as the asylum WiP was published on the HM Government website in August 2011 http://data.gov.uk/dataset/asylum-performance-framework (3) Figures were produced on 7 November 2011. (4) Includes cases from case assurance and audit unit (CAAU). (5) All figures rounded to the nearest hundred. (6) With the exception of Asylum all figures quoted are management information which has been subject to internal quality checks. (7) Asylum application figures are management information which has been subject to internal quality checks.

No ‘Other' cases were received within the last six months.

Civil Disorder

Malcolm Wicks: To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department how many claims for compensation under the Riot (Damages) Act 1886 arising from the civil disorder of August 2011 have been settled in each borough in Greater London; and what the total amount of compensation was in each case, at the latest date for which figures are available. [85573]

Nick Herbert: The Home Office does not hold the detail on the number or value of claims made specifically by individual boroughs of the Metropolitan Police Service.

Closed Circuit Television

Kerry McCarthy: To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department what representations she has received from police authorities on the decision by some local authorities to cease or reduce funding for the operation of CCTV; and what assessment her Department has made of any potential effect on the prevention and detection of crime. [86222]

James Brokenshire: No such representations have been received. The provision and deployment of CCTV by local authorities is a matter for them to assess in the light of local need and resources available.

15 Dec 2011 : Column 887W

Criminal Investigations: Care Homes

Mr Denham: To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department how many care homes in (a) Hampshire and (b) Southampton have been subject to police investigations in the last two years. [86597]

Nick Herbert: The information requested is not collected centrally.

Departmental Manpower

Mrs Ellman: To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department how many people were employed in the Liverpool offices of the (a) Criminal Records Bureau, (b) Identity and Passport Service and (c) United Kingdom Border Agency in 2010; and how many such people she expect to employ in 2015. [83709]

Damian Green: Table 1 following includes workforce figures for 2010 (as at 31 December 2010) using Office for National Statistics guidelines for workforce management reporting.

Table 1: People employed in Liverpool on 31 December 2010
Department HC FTE HC

Criminal Records Bureau

605.13

648

Identity and Passport Service

363.57

398

United Kingdom Border Agency

1,710.88

1,853

Grand total

2,679.57

2,899

Note: Includes all permanent and paid civil servants as per ONS reporting guidelines. Extract Date: 31 December 2010 Source: Data View, the Home Office's single source of monthly Human Resources data.

Home Office workforce plans are designed to be flexible to best support evolving business priorities throughout the spending review period and to be affordable within the Home Office's spending review settlement. It is not possible to forecast the number of people who will be employed in Liverpool in Criminal Records Bureau, Identity and Passport Service and United Kingdom Border Agency in 2015, as this falls into the next spending review period and workforce plans have not yet been drawn-up.

Departmental Responsibilities

Mr Thomas: To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department at how many events organised by (a) charities, (b) other civil society groups, (c) businesses and (d) lobbying organisations Ministers and senior officials in her Department have given speeches in each month since May 2010; and if she will make a statement. [77342]

Damian Green: This information is not held centrally and could be collated only at disproportionate cost.

15 Dec 2011 : Column 888W

Detainees: Children

Jeremy Corbyn: To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department how many children under 16 years are being held in detention for immigration purposes; and how many were being held in (a) May 2011, (b) January 2011 and (c) June 2010. [77052]

Damian Green: The latest published management information for the number of children under 16 years of age entering detention, held solely under Immigration Act powers in immigration removal centres, short term holding facilities and pre-departure accommodation at Cedars is six in October 2011; seven in May 2011; two in January 2011 and 26 in June 2010.

This information is a subset of published data that correspond closest to the dates requested. These figures exclude those detained in police cells, Prison Service establishments and short-term holding rooms at ports and airports (for less than 24 hours), those recorded as detained under both criminal and immigration powers and their dependants. They may include age disputed cases. Cedars pre-departure accommodation for families opened on 17 August 2011.

Information on numbers of children entering detention is published monthly and is available from the Home Office Science, Research and Statistics web pages at:

http://homeoffice.gov.uk/science-research/research-statistics/migration/migration-statistics1/

A copy of the latest month has been placed in the Library of the House. November 2011 figures will be available on 29 December 2011.

Information on children detained under immigration Act powers, on any single day, is only published for the last day of each quarter. This information is available from the same web site and from the Library of the House. Figures for those detained on 30 September 2011 have been published on 24 November 2011.

Drugs Testing

John Mann: To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department what her Department's policy is on mandatory drugs testing for its staff. [86618]

Damian Green: The Home Office does not have mandatory drug testing arrangements in place for its staff.

Extradition: Russia

Mr David: To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department whether she has any plans to review the operation of extradition arrangements between the UK and Russia. [86550]

Damian Green: The UK keeps its extradition relations with other countries under constant review. As the UK and Russia are both members of the Council of Europe, extradition between our two countries is governed by the 1957 Council of Europe Convention on Extradition. There are currently no plans to review this Convention.

15 Dec 2011 : Column 889W

Forensic Science

Mr Jim Cunningham: To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department if she considers crime scene investigators to be front line staff. [86181]

Nick Herbert: In its report Demanding Times, published in March 2011, Her Majesty's Inspectorate of Constabulary (HMIC) defined and categorised police roles. The report can be found at:

www.hmic.gov.uk

Mr Jim Cunningham: To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department if she will take steps to safeguard the services provided by crime scene investigators; and if she will make a statement. [86182]

Damian Green: Decisions about the deployment of police resources, including crime scene investigators, are a matter for chief constables to take locally in conjunction with their police authority and, from November 2012, their police and crime commissioner.

Human Trafficking Ministerial Group

Lady Hermon: To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department on what dates the Inter-Departmental Ministerial Group on human trafficking has met since May 2010; who its members are; and which members attended each such meeting. [86446]

Damian Green: The Inter-Departmental Ministerial Group on human trafficking met on 17 February 2011 and 11 October 2011. A list of members and attendees for each meeting is provided in the following list:

Inter-Departmental Ministerial Group (IDMG) on human trafficking ministerial-level meeting attendees and non-attending members

17 February 2011 meeting:

Attendees:

Damian Green MP, Minister for Immigration (Chair)

Lynne Featherstone MP, Parliamentary Under-Secretary of State for Equalities and Criminal Information

Edward Garnier MP, Solicitor General

Crispin Blunt MP, Minister for Justice

Kenny MacAskill MSP, Cabinet Secretary for Justice, Scottish Government (by video link)

Apologies:

Anne Milton MP, Parliamentary Under-Secretary of State for Public Health(1)

Jeremy Browne MP, Minister of State, FCO(1)

Tim Loughton MP, Parliamentary Under-Secretary of State for Children and Families

Baroness Hanham, Parliamentary Under-Secretary of State for Communities

Baroness Wilcox, Parliamentary Under-Secretary of State for BIS

Lord Freud, Minister for Welfare Reform

David Ford MLA, Northern Ireland Executive(1)

Gwenda Thomas AM, Welsh Assembly Government

Stephen O'Brien, Parliamentary Under-Secretary of State for International Development(1)

15 Dec 2011 : Column 890W

11 October 2011 meeting

Attendees:

Damian Green MP, Minister for Immigration (Chair)

Lord Wallace of Tankerness, Advocate General for Scotland (representing Ministry of Justice)

Baroness Hanham, Department of Communities and Local Government

Jeremy Browne, FCO

David Jones, Wales Office

Stephen O'Brien, Parliamentary Under-Secretary of State for International Development

Apologies:

Edward Garnier, Solicitor General(1)

Tim Loughton, Department for Education(1)

Crispin Blunt, Ministry of Justice

Anne Milton MP, Parliamentary Under-Secretary of State for Public Health

Michael Moore, Scotland Office

Baroness Wilcox, Parliamentary Under-Secretary of State for BIS

Lord Freud, Department for Work and Pensions

Kenny MacAskill MSP, Cabinet Secretary for Justice, Scottish Government(1)

David Ford MLA, Northern Ireland Executive(1)

Carl Sargeant, Welsh Assembly Government(1)

Lynne Featherstone, Government Equalities Office (GEO)

(1) Indicates official-level deputies present at the meeting

Immigrants: Citizenship

Mr Frank Field: To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department how many immigrants to the UK have successfully applied for UK citizenship in each of the last 10 years; and if she will make a statement. [86561]

Damian Green: The available statistics are given in the following table. It is not possible to identify separately grants of British citizenship made to migrants as opposed to those that are UK born within the published data.

The number of applications for and grants of British citizenship has risen significantly since the mid-1990s. This increase is likely, in part, to reflect increased grants of settlement over the same period to non-European economic area nationals—after a period of residence those granted settlement become eligible to apply for citizenship.

The latest Home Office immigration statistics on persons granted British citizenship, from which the data in this reply are derived, are given in table ‘cz.02’ of the statistical release ‘Immigration Statistics July-September 2011’. This publication is available from the Library of the House and from the Home Office Science web site at:

http://www.homeoffice.gov.uk/publications/science-research-statistics/research-statistics/immigration-asylum-research/immigration-q3-2011/

15 Dec 2011 : Column 891W

15 Dec 2011 : Column 892W

British citizenship grants by general category

All grants Naturalisation based on residence Naturalisation based on marriage Registration of minor children related to a British citizen on a discretionary basis Registration on other grounds

2001

90,282

39,498

28,618

21,239

927

2002

120,121

57,595

34,414

26,319

1,793

2003

130,535

54,967

36,757

35,344

3,467

2004

148,273

64,103

40,406

38,415

5,349

2005

161,699

77,334

34,496

41,641

8,228

2006

154,018

77,080

27,587

42,447

6,904

2007

164,637

87,785

30,423

40,534

5,895

2008

129,377

65,713

29,075

30,832

3,757

2009

203,789

99,474

52,627

47,814

3,874

2010

195,046

93,681

47,028

48,611

5,726

Notes: 1. Data for 2010 are provisional figures. 2. Data presented relate to number of persons. Cases dealt with in the United Kingdom. 3. Grants: A positive outcome of an application for British citizenship prior to attending a citizenship ceremony by applicants over 18 years of age. 4. ‘Decisions taken to grant’ from November 2001 include grants of British citizenship in the Channel Islands and Isle of Man. 5. Marriage includes civil partnership introduced from 5 December 2005. 6. Minor children: children under 18 years of age. 7. Other includes British Overseas Territories citizens from Gibraltar registered as British citizens under s.5 of the British Nationality Act 1981. Source: Home Office, Migration Statistics.

Immigrants: Detainees

Priti Patel: To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department with reference to the detention data tables Immigration Statistics April-June 2011 table dt.07.q, whether any of the 74 individuals detained for more than 24 months (1) is appealing against (a) their detention and (b) their removal from the UK on human rights grounds; [82104]

(2) has an appeal case against their (a) detention and (b) removal from the UK lodged with (i) a domestic court and (ii) the European Court of Human Rights. [82105]

Damian Green: The following table sets out the total length of stay in the UK of the 74 individuals detained for more than 24 months referred to in the Immigration Statistics April to June 2011.

Length of time (in years) in the UK based on first application raised Number of individuals

3

7

4

7

5

13

6

5

7

6

8

10

9

7

10

4

11

5

12

3

13

1

14

1

15

1

17

2

18

1

20

1

The following table sets out the reasons why the 74 individuals detained for more than 24 months referred to in the Immigration Statistics April to June 2011 had not been removed from the UK. As the table shows, five of the individuals have now been removed from the UK. This information is taken from internal management information and is subject to change.

Barriers to removal Number of individuals

Travel document

39

Appeals

6

Children issues

1

Country situation

1

Nationality not confirmed

1

Judicial review

15

Awaiting removal: multiple barriers

4

Rule 39(1)

2

Removed

5

(1) This is a request to the European court of human rights (under rule 39) that an applicant should not be removed from the UK.

Of the 74 individuals detained for more than 24 months referred to in the Immigration Statistics April to June 2011, 53 lodged an appeal against their deportation. In addition to this:

29 individuals submitted a judicial review (JR) against unlawful detention.

five submitted a JR on HR grounds.

five submitted a JR against unlawful detention and on HR grounds.

To determine in which court those of the 74 individuals detained for more than 24 months referred to in the Immigration Statistics April to June 2011 have lodged an appeal against detention or removal would require the examination of individual case files which would incur a disproportionate cost.

15 Dec 2011 : Column 893W

Immigration Controls

Diana Johnson: To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department how many people she expected to enter the UK through ports operating the pilot scheme of reduced checks at border control points during the pilot scheme. [81094]

Damian Green: There were 20.2 million passenger arrivals to the United Kingdom during the first quarter (January to March) of 2011 of which 2.4 million were non-EEA nationals, 11.2 million were British citizens and 6.5 million were from other EEA countries and Switzerland. These figures are numbers of journeys and include passengers in transit who do not pass through immigration controls.

Further information relating to the second quarter (April to June) of 2011 was published on 24 November 2011 in the Home Office Science publication, ‘Immigration Statistics July to September 2011’, and the third quarter will be published on 23 February 2012. These data will be available from the Library of the House and from the Home Office Science website at:

http://www.homeoffice.gov.uk/publications/science-research-statistics/research-statistics/immigration-asylum-research/

Mr Evennett: To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department what steps she is taking to reform the sponsorship rules for family migration. [84816]

Damian Green: The family migration consultation closed on 6 October 2011. It proposed new measures to tackle abuse, promote integration and reduce burdens on the taxpayer. The Government are considering the responses to the consultation and will publish their response in due course.

Mr Llwyd: To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department which border control checks were suspended on (a) 30 June 2011 and (b) 30 November 2011; whether those suspensions had ministerial approval; and when any such approval was given. [86088]

Damian Green: In advance of industrial action on 30 June and 30 November an operating protocol was authorised by my right hon. Friend the Secretary of State for the Home Department. The protocol ensured that appropriate immigration and customs checks were conducted on all passengers arriving at UK ports and airports during the period of industrial action.

Immigration Controls: Cyclamen Machines

Mr Llwyd: To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department how many (a) ports and (b) airports did not operate cyclamen machines on 30 November 2011. [86089]

Damian Green: Cyclamen remained operational on 30 November 2011 at all ports and airports where fixed equipment is installed. Screening was undertaken following standard operating procedures.

15 Dec 2011 : Column 894W

Members: Correspondence

Sir John Stanley: To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department when she plans to reply to the letters from the right hon. Member for Tonbridge and Malling dated 26 January, 17 May and 8 July 2011 regarding correspondence received from Mr F. G. Thurygill. [86372]

James Brokenshire: A response was sent on 15 December 2011.

Police

Mrs Moon: To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department which police forces have opted to use (a) trauma risk management and (b) applied suicide intervention skills training; and if she will make a statement. [86459]

Nick Herbert: This information is not held centrally.

Police: Accountability

Jessica Morden: To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department what estimate she has made of the cost of introducing police commissioners in Wales; and how much of such costs is attributable to (a) commissioners' pay, (b) staffing costs and (c) other costs. [85994]

Nick Herbert: I have previously laid before Parliament the recommendations of the Senior Salaries Review Body in respect of the salaries for police and crime commissioners (PCCs), including the PCCs of the four Welsh forces; my right hon. Friend the Secretary of State for the Home Department and I are currently considering these recommendations and will provide our response to the report in the near future. Once elected it will be for each PCC to determine the cost of their staff and publicly account for all costs of their office. The total estimated day-to-day costs of PCCs in Wales are not expected to be any higher than the current costs of police authorities in the area.

Union of Good

Robert Halfon: To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department what discussions she has had with the US Government on the Union of Good; and if she will make a statement. [86592]

James Brokenshire: Home Office Ministers and officials have meetings with a wide variety of international partners, as well as organisations and individuals in the public and private sectors, as part of the process of policy development and delivery.

As was the case with previous Administrations, it is not the Government's practice to provide details of all such meetings.

Windsor Review of Police Officers

Richard Burden: To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department what (a) representations she has received and (b) discussions she has had with the

15 Dec 2011 : Column 895W

Police Federation of England and Wales on the Windsor Review of Police Officers' and Staff Remuneration and Conditions; and if she will make a statement. [86650]

Nick Herbert: The Independent Review of Police Officer and Staff Remuneration and Conditions is in two parts. My right hon. Friend the Secretary of State for the Home Department referred recommendations

15 Dec 2011 : Column 896W

about police officers' pay and conditions from part 1 of the review to the police negotiating machinery and that process is ongoing. We will consider the outcome of that process carefully before any decisions are made as to the implementation of Tom Winsor's recommendations. Part 2 of the review is due to report in January.

Ministers meet and engage regularly with the Police Federation.