We do not hold data centrally for our arm’s length bodies. Accordingly, I have asked their chief executives to write directly to my hon. Friend the Member for Witham.

Copies of the replies will be deposited in the Libraries of both Houses.

Departmental Responsibilities

Mr Davidson: To ask the Secretary of State for Culture, Olympics, Media and Sport on how many occasions he has visited (a) Scotland, (b) Wales and (c) Northern Ireland in an official capacity in the last 12 months; and whom he met on each such visit. [90365]

John Penrose: In 2011 the Secretary of State for Culture, Olympics, Media and Sport, my right hon. Friend the Member for South West Surrey (Mr Hunt), as part of a series of Local TV summits, visited Newport

18 Jan 2012 : Column 840W

on 26 August, and both Glasgow and Belfast on 9 September. As part of the Summits, he met a range of interested parties, including established media organisations, new media entrants and community media groups. There were 100 attendees in Newport, 65 attendees in Glasgow and 60 attendees in Belfast. In addition, on 9 September he met the Scottish Minister for Culture and External Affairs to discuss broadband, local TV and Scottish broadcasting.

Internships

Luciana Berger: To ask the Secretary of State for Culture, Olympics, Media and Sport what guidelines his Department issues to its non-departmental public bodies on the employment of unpaid interns. [89403]

John Penrose: This Department has not issued specific advice to its non-departmental public bodies (NDPBs) on the employment of unpaid interns. However, if advice is sought from the Department, NDPBs are referred to “The Common Best Practice Guide for High Quality Internships” published by the Gateways to the Professions Collaborative Forum, which can be found on the Department for Business, Innovation and Skills' website:

http://www.bis.gov.uk/assets/biscore/higher-education/docs/c/11-1068-common-best-practice-code-for-quality-internships.pdf

Work and Pensions

Atos Healthcare

Tom Greatrex: To ask the Secretary of State for Work and Pensions what proportion of claimants participating in the Atos Quality Survey in each region rated Atos Healthcare's performance as (a) very good, (b) good, (c) poor and (d) very poor in (i) 2008, (ii) 2009, (iii) 2010 and (iv) 2011. [90236]

Chris Grayling: Unfortunately the information requested above is not available in the format requested.

The answer could be provided in the requested format only at disproportionate costs exceeding the disproportionate cost limit of £800 for parliamentary questions.

EU Law

John Mann: To ask the Secretary of State for Work and Pensions how many of the regulations his Department brought into force through (a) primary legislation, (b) secondary legislation and (c) other means originated from proposals by the European Commission in (i) 2010 and (ii) 2011. [88962]

Chris Grayling: The following new secondary legislation and legally binding guidance brought forward by my Department and brought into force in 2010 and 2011 originated from proposals made by the European Commission before 2010:

The Occupational, Personal and Stakeholder Pensions (Miscellaneous Amendment) Regulations 2009 (SI 2009/615);

The Application of Pension Legislation to the National Employment Savings Trust Corporation Regulations (SI 2010/8);

18 Jan 2012 : Column 841W

The Biocidal Products (Amendment) Regulations 2010 (SI 2010/745);

The Control of Artificial Optical Radiation at Work Regulations 2010 (SI 2010/1140);

The Transfer of State Pensions and Benefits (Amendment) Regulations 2010 (SI

2010/1825);

The Occupational Pensions (Investment) (Amendment) Regulations 2010 (SI 2010/2161;

The Application of Pension Legislation to the National Employment Savings Trust Corporation Regulations 2011 (SI 2011/673); and

HSE publication EH40/2005: Workplace Exposure Limits.

No new legislation or guidance has been brought into force by my Department which originated from European Commission proposals made in 2010 and 2011.

Remploy

Mrs Moon: To ask the Secretary of State for Work and Pensions pursuant to the answer of 12 January 2012, Official Report, column 384W, on Remploy: social enterprises, how many requests to waive the recruitment freeze his Department has received from Remploy since the freeze began; and what assessment he has made of the effects of the freeze on the viability of factories bidding for contracts. [90455]

Maria Miller: Since the freeze on external recruitment across the civil service and its related non-departmental public bodies, the Department has received requests from Remploy to recruit externally across the business for 302 posts. Of these 35 were for the Enterprise Businesses and 25 of these were approved. Requests relating to the Enterprise Businesses have in the main been for management and business support posts, such as key account and sales managers. The remaining 267 requests relate to posts in Employment Services, of which 200 have been approved.

I am not aware of any effect the freeze has had on the viability of factories bidding for contracts.

Social Security Benefits: Bexley

Mr Evennett: To ask the Secretary of State for Work and Pensions what the average total level of benefits received per household was in (a) Bexleyheath and Crayford constituency and (b) the London borough of Bexley in the latest period for which figures are available. [90524]

Chris Grayling: While information on DWP administered benefits is available at constituency level, we do not hold complete information on those benefits administered by other Government Departments and organisations. Restricting analysis to those benefits administered directly by DWP may present a misleading picture of benefit receipt. In addition, we estimate that developing an appropriate methodology and quality assuring any analysis of DWP administrative data would exceed disproportionate cost limits.

According to the latest release of the Family Resource Survey (FRS), the median weekly household income from benefits and tax credits for households with at least one member in receipt of at least one benefit or tax credit in the United Kingdom in 2009-10 was £141. The

18 Jan 2012 : Column 842W

sample size of the FRS is not large enough to provide robust estimates at the constituency or borough level.

Notes:

1. Numbers have been rounded to the nearest pound.

2. The estimates are based on sample counts that have been adjusted for non-response using multi-purpose grossing factors that control for tenure type, council tax band and a number of demographic variables.

3. Estimates are subject to sampling error and remaining non-sampling bias.

4. The FRS is known to under-record benefit receipt. Please see table M6 of Chapter 7 of the latest publication for more information:

http://statistics.dwp.gov.uk/asd/frs/2009_10/frs_2009_10_report.pdf

5. These figures have not been adjusted to account for different household sizes.

6. A household refers to a single person or group of people living at the same address as their only or main residence, who either share one meal a day together or share the living accommodation (i.e. a living room). A household will consist of one or more benefit units.

Unemployment: Graduates

Mr George Howarth: To ask the Secretary of State for Work and Pensions how many graduates are registered as unemployed in each parliamentary constituency. [90661]

Mr Hurd: I have been asked to reply on behalf of the Cabinet Office.

The information requested falls within the responsibility of the UK Statistics Authority. I have asked the authority to reply.

Letter from Stephen Penneck, dated January 2012:

As Director General for the Office for National Statistics, I have been asked to reply to your Parliamentary Question asking how many graduates are registered as unemployed in each parliamentary constituency in the UK (90661).

The Office for National Statistics (ONS) compiles unemployment statistics for local areas from the Annual Population Survey (APS) following International Labour Organisation (ILO) definitions. Unfortunately the sample size does not support analyses of graduate unemployment at parliamentary constituency level.

National and local area estimates for many labour market statistics, including employment, unemployment and claimant count are available on the NOMIS website at:

http://www.nomisweb.co.uk

Work Capability Assessments

Tom Greatrex: To ask the Secretary of State for Work and Pensions how many employment and support allowance claimants in each region were asked to participate in the Atos Quality Survey (a) before learning the outcome of their work capability assessment and (b) after learning the outcome of their work capability assessment in (i) 2008, (ii) 2009, (iii) 2010 and (iv) 2011. [90237]

Chris Grayling: Neither Atos Healthcare nor Wyman Dillon, the market research company which carries out the Atos quality survey on their behalf, know if a claimant has received the outcome of their work capability assessment when they participate in the survey as the entitlement to benefit decision is issued by the DWP.

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Tom Greatrex: To ask the Secretary of State for Work and Pensions with reference to page 24 of Professor Malcolm Harrington's report, An Independent Review of the Work Capability Assessment—year two, what discussions he has had with the Tribunal Service on the provision of statistical information to the Harrington Review in relation to the monitoring of appeal outcomes within and between tribunals. [90307]

Chris Grayling: Professor Harrington has not, to date, asked the Department to request this statistical information on his behalf.

As his second independent review makes clear Professor Harrington intends to continue to pursue his recommendations relating to the Tribunal Service over the coming year, including the monitoring of appeals outcomes within and between Tribunals.

The Department supports this work and believe it could have a positive impact on the WCA process as a whole.

Tom Greatrex: To ask the Secretary of State for Work and Pensions with reference to page 10 of the Government's response to Professor Malcolm Harrington's second independent review of the work capability assessment, what progress has been made on the national implementation of the Decision Maker's Justification to all employment and support allowance claimants found not to have limited capability for work. [90308]

Chris Grayling: National implementation activity commenced in December 2011 to issue the Decision Maker's reasons to incapacity benefit (IB) reassessment and employment and support allowance (ESA) claimants found to have no limited capability for work following the WCA and disallowed ESA on and after 23 January 2012.

The Decision Maker's Reasoning (previously referred to as Decision Maker's Justification) will provide these claimants with a clear explanation of the decision and all the evidence considered by the Decision Maker not just the Atos assessment. This along with the disallowance call, introduced as part of the ESA changes in October 2011, delivers the intended aim of Professor Harrington's year one recommendation.

Tom Greatrex: To ask the Secretary of State for Work and Pensions with reference to page 12 of the Government's response to Professor Malcolm Harrington's second independent review of the work capability assessment, if he will publish the proposals developed by Mind, Mencap and the National Autistic Society for refinements to the mental function descriptors of the work capability assessment. [90312]

Chris Grayling: We currently have no plans to formally publish the report submitted by Professor Harrington to us on the mental, intellectual and cognitive descriptors. Professor Harrington's second independent review of the work capability assessment contains a precis of the reports recommendations.

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A copy of the Mind, Mencap and the National Autistic Society report is available in the House Library.

On 17 January 2012, Official Report, column 654W, answers to questions PQ 90313 and PQ 90314 update on the progress with this work.

Tom Greatrex: To ask the Secretary of State for Work and Pensions with reference to page 13 of the Government's response to Professor Malcolm Harrington's second independent review of the work capability assessment, how many Quality Assessment Framework events have been held since July 2011, by region. [90315]

Chris Grayling: The Quality Assessment Framework was introduced in July for incapacity benefit (IB) reassessment decisions and in August for employment and support allowance (ESA) decisions. Since then quality checks on decisions have been completed and feedback and improvement discussions completed on a regular basis between managers and individual Decision Makers in order to improve the quality and consistency of decision making.

In addition, to ensure the consistent application of standards in the Quality Assessment Framework, a national calibration exercise was held in November, followed by similar events at DWP Group level. These were timed to allow for the framework and checking regime to bed in.

Tom Greatrex: To ask the Secretary of State for Work and Pensions with reference to page 14 of the Government's response to Professor Malcolm Harrington's second independent review of the work capability assessment, what steps his Department takes following the receipt of more than one C-grade assessment by an Atos-approved healthcare professional. [90319]

Chris Grayling: Atos are responsible for the performance management of their health care professionals. Any health care professional who generates a C grade report receives mandatory feedback. Subsequent action may include targeted audit or retraining if required. The DWP Chief Medical Adviser will revoke approval to carry out assessments if there is persistent failure to achieve a satisfactory standard, despite remedial action by Atos.

Tom Greatrex: To ask the Secretary of State for Work and Pensions with reference to page 16 of the Government's response to Professor Malcolm Harrington's Second Independent Review of the Work Capability Assessment, what progress he has made in implementing recommendation one of Professor Harrington's year one recommendation. [90320]

Chris Grayling: Enhanced support for employment and support allowance (ESA) claimants was introduced via a phased national approach, which commenced in June and was completed on 31 October 2011. Claimants will benefit from a new letter explaining the WCA process; and a telephone call by the DWP Decision Maker to explain the decision made on their claim. DWP endorses Professor Harrington's year two recommendation to monitor the impact of the year one changes and evaluation is currently under way.

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Tom Greatrex: To ask the Secretary of State for Work and Pensions with reference to page 16 of the Government's response to Professor Malcolm Harrington's second independent review of the work capability assessment, how many unannounced visits to (a) benefits delivery centres and (b) Atos medical assessment centres took place in each region in 2011. [90322]

Chris Grayling: Pages 24 and 25 of Professor Harrington's second independent review of the WCA cover his unannounced visits in 2011.

He visited Gloucester and Merthyr Tydfil Benefit Delivery Centres. He did not make any unannounced visits to Atos sites.

The Government accepted Professor Harrington's recommendation to make further unannounced visits to both Benefit Delivery Centres and Atos assessment centres in 2012. We will leave it to Professor Harrington to decide where and when he will make these visits, and look forward to his feedback on completed visits.

Tom Greatrex: To ask the Secretary of State for Work and Pensions with reference to page 17 of the Government's response to Professor Malcolm Harrington's Second Independent Review of the Work Capability Assessment, when his Department's training products guidance and handbook sections were last updated following consultation with representative groups and their medical advisers. [90323]

Chris Grayling: The Revised WCA handbook was last revised on 4 October 2011 incorporating information from the Migraine Trust. The latest guidance to be developed in conjunction with a representative group was a distance learning module on violence against women and girls developed in conjunction with South Essex Rape and Incest Crisis Centre which was issued in May 2011.

Tom Greatrex: To ask the Secretary of State for Work and Pensions with reference to page 18 of the Government's response to Professor Malcolm Harrington's Second Independent Review of the Work Capability Assessment, on what date he plans to publish part one of his Department's research into what happens to people found fit for work, and those placed in work related activity and support groups. [90325]

Chris Grayling: We plan to publish the research on 27 January. It will be available on the DWP website.

Tom Greatrex: To ask the Secretary of State for Work and Pensions with reference to page 18 of the Government's response to Professor Malcolm Harrington's Second Independent Review of the Work Capability Assessment, if he will publish the results of the monitoring of free text by Atos Healthcare. [90326]

Chris Grayling: DWP has no current plans to publish the results of the monitoring of free text by Atos.

Tom Greatrex: To ask the Secretary of State for Work and Pensions with reference to page 18 of the Government's response to Professor Malcolm Harrington's Second Independent Review of the Work Capability Assessment,

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when he last received a report from Atos Healthcare of the results into the use of free text. [90327]

Chris Grayling: DWP has not received any reports from Atos of the results into the use of free text as this is not information that Atos is currently asked or required to provide.

Tom Greatrex: To ask the Secretary of State for Work and Pensions with reference to page 18 of the Government's response to Professor Malcolm Harrington's Second Independent Review of the Work Capability Assessment, on how many occasions he received a report from Atos Healthcare of the results into the use of free text in 2011. [90328]

Chris Grayling: DWP has not received any reports from Atos of the results into the use of free text as this is not information that Atos is currently asked or required to provide.

Tom Greatrex: To ask the Secretary of State for Work and Pensions with reference to page 19 of the Government's response to Professor Malcolm Harrington's Second Independent Review of the Work Capability Assessment, what assessment he has made of the recruitment and retention of Atos-approved healthcare professionals. [90329]

Chris Grayling: The recruitment and retention of Atos Healthcare, Healthcare Professionals continues to be monitored on a monthly basis. The monthly report tracks progress against recruitment and retention targets. Presently, Atos Healthcare is providing a good level of priority to recruitment and retention, although with regards to recruitment there are challenging geographical areas where actions are in place to resolve these during 2012.

Tom Greatrex: To ask the Secretary of State for Work and Pensions with reference to page 20 of the Government's response to Professor Malcolm Harrington's second independent review of the work capability assessment, what (a) his timetable is for and (b) progress he has made on evaluating the customer journey. [90332]

Chris Grayling: The changes to the employment and support allowance (ESA) customer journey, introduced nationally from 31 October 2011, provides additional support to individuals via a new letter explaining the WCA process; and a telephone call by the Decision Maker to explain the decision made on their claim. A phased national implementation approach enabled the evaluation of these changes prior to national rollout to ensure they would deliver improvements to the customer experience.

National rollout will enable more robust evaluation to be completed, which will enable DWP to identify further improvements and findings will feed into Professor Harrington's year three review.

Transport

Coventry Gateway Project

Mr Jim Cunningham: To ask the Secretary of State for Transport whether she has had recent discussions with Coventry and Warwickshire Local Enterprise

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Partnership (LEP) on the

(a)

funding allocated to the Tollbar Island in the Autumn Statement and

(b)

work of the LEP on the Coventry Gateway project; and if she will make a statement. [89803]

Norman Baker: The Autumn Statement of 29 November 2011, Official Report, columns 799-810, by the Chancellor of the Exchequer, the right hon. Member for Tatton (Mr Osborne), confirmed the A45/A46 Tollbar End improvement scheme as one of six major projects to be brought forward for construction earlier than previously planned, subject to the completion of statutory processes where applicable.

Ministers have had no discussions with Coventry and Warwickshire LEP on this subject. However, senior officials from the Department for Transport, Highways Agency, Department for Business, Innovation and Skills, and Department for Communities and Local Government met representatives of the promoters of the Coventry Gateway project and Coventry and Warwickshire LEP in December. The potential interaction of the A45 Tollbar End improvement and the Coventry Gateway project was discussed. It was agreed that the Highways Agency would have further detailed discussions with the promoters with the aim of ensuring that the two projects are compatible.

Motor Vehicles: Licensing

David Mowat: To ask the Secretary of State for Transport what plans she has to require operators of Showmen's vehicles and Showmen's goods vehicles to obtain an operator's licence; and if she will make a statement. [90190]

Mike Penning: Showmen's goods vehicles and any trailers drawn by them are exempt from goods vehicle operator licensing. The Government have no plans to change this.

Motor Vehicles: Lighting

Daniel Kawczynski: To ask the Secretary of State for Transport what steps she is taking to raise awareness of road safety standards on correct use of headlights by vehicles in rain, snow and low-light. [90552]

Mike Penning: There are no current plans to raise awareness of road safety standards regarding the correct use of headlights by vehicles in rain, snow and low-light. The Highways Agency's winter campaign includes a call to “Make sure your lights are clean and check the bulbs”:

http://www.highways.gov.uk/knowledge/33230.aspx

The Highway Code also provides information for drivers when driving in adverse conditions.

Motor Vehicles: Testing

Cathy Jamieson: To ask the Secretary of State for Transport (1) what assessment she has made of the effect on employment in Scotland of the proposed changes to MOT tests; [88145]

(2) what estimate she has made of the number of MOT tests which will be carried out in Scotland each year after the implementation of her proposed changes to MOT tests; [88146]

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(3) how many MOT testing stations there are in each (a) parliamentary constituency and (b) local authority area in Scotland; [88175]

(4) how many MOT tests were conducted in each (a) parliamentary constituency and (b) local authority area in Scotland in each of the last five years; [88176]

(5) how many MOT testers are registered in each (a) parliamentary constituency and (b) local authority area in Scotland; [88177]

(6) what assessment she has made of the economic impact in (a) Scotland and (b) Kilmarnock and Loudoun constituency of the proposed changes to MOT tests; [88301]

(7) what estimate she has made of the likely change in the number of (a) MOT testers and (b) MOT test centres in Scotland following the proposed changes to MOT tests. [88302]

Mike Penning: I expect to make an announcement soon about the timing and scope of a review of the MOT.

No assessment has been made of the effect on employment in Scotland or on the economic impact in (a) Scotland and (b) Kilmarnock and Loudoun constituency with regard to any potential changes to MOT tests.

No estimate has been made of the number of MOT tests which will be carried out in Scotland each year or the likely change in the number of (a) MOT testers and (b) MOT test centres in Scotland with regard to any potential changes to MOT tests.

With regard to the number of MOT testing stations, MOT tests conducted and MOT testers registered in each (a) parliamentary constituency and (b) local authority area in Scotland; the information requested is not processed in constituency or regional format and would invoke disproportionate cost.

Motorways: Speed limits

Barry Gardiner: To ask the Secretary of State for Transport what steps her Department plans to put in place to offset the increase in emissions attributable to any increase in the motorway speed limit. [90812]

Mike Penning: We are assessing all the principal effects of raising the national speed limit on motorways and on some all-purpose trunk roads which are close to motorway standard. Our assessments include estimates of fuel use and carbon emissions. We will include these estimates as part of the documentation for the planned consultation.

We are also delivering progressive cuts in transport carbon emissions through a range of measures set out in our Carbon Plan published on 1st December 2011. For example, new cars sold in 2020 are projected to emit around a third less carbon than the current average. A link to the Government's Carbon Plan can be found at:

http://www.decc.gov.uk/en/content/cms/tackling/carbon_plan/carbon_plan.aspx

The Strategic Framework for Road safety sets out a series of measures we are doing to improve road safety.

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Queen Elizabeth II Bridge

Jackie Doyle-Price: To ask the Secretary of State for Transport what assessment she has made of the effects of the closure of the Queen Elizabeth II Bridge on traffic levels in Thurrock on 4 January 2012; and if she will make a statement. [90350]

Mike Penning: On 4 January the QEII Bridge was closed during the evening from 21.43 and reopened at 17.09 on 5 January. The effects of the closure on traffic levels in Thurrock on 4 January would therefore have been minimal.

Within Thurrock the Highways Agency are responsible for the M25, A282, A13 and A1089 trunk roads on behalf of the Secretary of State for Transport as highway authority. During each of the bridge closures traffic levels were monitored on the M25/A282.

There are no cameras or other equipment along the A13 or A1089 to monitor traffic levels, however the Highways Agency was aware of morning peak hour queuing on the A13 westbound in the Thurrock area which resulted from the reduction in capacity at the Dartford-Thurrock crossing.

Monitoring of traffic levels on other roads within Thurrock is undertaken by the local highway authority, Thurrock council.

Roads: Accidents

Daniel Kawczynski: To ask the Secretary of State for Transport how many road traffic accidents involved incorrect use of headlights as a contributory factor in Shrewsbury and Atcham constituency in (a) 2008, (b) 2009 and (c) 2010. [90551]

Mike Penning: Information specifically on the “incorrect use of headlights” as a contributory factor in road accidents is not collected by the Department. However, the following table shows the number of reported personal injury road accidents in the West Midlands which had “dazzling headlights” or “not displaying lights at night or in poor visibility” recorded as a contributory factor, over the period 2008-10. To protect the privacy of those involved in accidents, information on contributory factors is not released below former Government Office Region level.

Contributory factors are reported only for injury road accidents where a police officer attended the scene and reported at least one contributory factor. These factors are largely subjective, reflecting the attending officer's opinion at the time of reporting. It is recognised that subsequent inquiries could lead to the reporting officer changing their opinion.

Reported personal injury road accidents (1) involving “dazzling headlights” or “not displaying lights at night or in poor visibility” as a contributory factor in the West Midlands, 2008-10
  2008 2009 2010

Not displaying lights at night or in poor visibility

52

45

36

Dazzling headlights

35

35

26

(1 )Includes only accidents where a police officer attended the scene and in which a contributory factor was reported.

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Roads: Greater London

Dr Huppert: To ask the Secretary of State for Transport what assessment her Department has made of the effect of the relationship between local authorities in London and Transport for London on plans to devolve decision making on the classification of local roads. [89025]

Norman Baker [holding answer 12 January 2012]:Under the new system for road classification, responsibility for classification rests with the local highway authority. In London this is shared between the borough and City authorities, and Transport for London.

Local highway authorities should secure agreement to classification changes from other affected local highway authorities. Vesting co-ordinating responsibility in Transport for London would be a matter for the authorities involved, and would be perfectly acceptable. An appeals process will be available to local authorities and others.

Thameslink: Rolling Stock

Chris Williamson: To ask the Secretary of State for Transport (1) whether her Department takes account of foreign exchange rate risk between the bid and financial close of each batch for each bidder for the Thameslink Rolling Stock Programme; [89183]

(2) if she will estimate the extent of any risk to her Department from fluctuations in the exchange rate in respect of the Thameslink Rolling Stock Programme; and whether her Department has estimated the range of potential risks that relate to different exchange rate levels. [89884]

Mrs Villiers: The Department performs sensitivity analysis of exchange rate movements, and their repercussions on contract awards, on an ongoing basis.

Transport: Subsidies

Paul Maynard: To ask the Secretary of State for Transport (1) how many representations she has received from (a) hon. Members and (b) others concerning the withdrawal of discretionary transport subsidies; [89072]

(2) what estimate she has made of the total expenditure on discretionary transport subsidies in each of the last three years; [89074]

(3) which local authorities have (a) withdrawn and (b) reduced the level of discretionary transport subsidies in England over the last five years. [89075]

Tim Loughton: I have been asked to reply on behalf of the Department for Education.

The Department does not require or collect any information from local authorities or other sources on levels of total expenditure on discretionary transport support. We regularly receive letters and other information from Members of Parliament, which cover home to school transport as well as other policy areas. We do not hold records on how many such requests are specifically about the withdrawal of discretionary transport subsidies.

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Written Questions: Government Responses

Miss McIntosh: To ask the Secretary of State for Transport when she plans to reply to question 88707, tabled on 20 December 2011, on roads. [90554]

Mike Penning: I answered this question on 11 January 2012, Official Report, column 310W.

Energy and Climate Change

Biomass

Susan Elan Jones: To ask the Secretary of State for Energy and Climate Change what assessment he has made of the effects of his Department's policy to incentivise co-firing, conversion and dedicated biomass on wood fuel resources. [89876]

Gregory Barker: As part of our consultation on the renewables obligation banding review, DECC published a partial impact assessment which included consideration of the impact of its proposals on sustainably-sourced wood fuel resources. Resource supply scenarios indicate that by 2020 global woody bioenergy resource that could be available for use by the UK bioenergy industry could be in the region of 170-515 TWh. Modelling for the renewables obligation banding review suggests approximately 110 TWh of woody fuels will be required for conversion, co-firing and dedicated biomass in 2020.

The consultation closed on 12 January. DECC intends to publish the Government response and full impact assessment in the spring, informed by the submissions received and the conclusions of the cross-Government bioenergy strategy, due in March. The strategy will set out a strategic framework for the use of bioenergy to 2020 and is examining three main issues:

The availability of sustainably sourced feedstocks to 2020 and beyond;

The potential impacts (economic and carbon) of using biomass in the energy sector including for alternative uses for bio-resources; and

The most appropriate use of biomass feedstocks in the energy sector (electricity, heat and transport) to 2020 and beyond taking into account wider Government objectives such as cost-effectiveness, carbon abatement potential, renewables targets and security of supply.

Energy

David Mowat: To ask the Secretary of State for Energy and Climate Change what the cost per kWh is for (a) solar, (b) offshore wind, (c) onshore wind and (d) nuclear power generation; and what estimate his Department has made of such costs in 2020. [88878]

Gregory Barker: DECC commissioned Arup consultants to assess the generation costs of renewable electricity generation technologies and Parsons Brinckerhoff consultants to assess the generation costs of non-renewable technologies.

The Arup and PB reports(1) quote the following projected levelised costs of electricity per MWh for 2011 and 2017, using a 10% discount rate, for solar, offshore wind, onshore wind and nuclear:

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Levelised costs of electricity, 10% discount rate (based on Arup and PB reports)
£/MWh
Technology Levelised cost with 2011 project start Levelised cost with 2017 project start

Solar PV

314.3

240.8

Offshore wind Round 2

121.6

105.7

Offshore wind Round 3

147.5

122.4

Onshore wind >5MW

90.2

87.5

Nuclear

74.1 (FOAK)

64.9 (NOAK)

Note: FOAK refers to first-of-a-kind and NOAK to nth-of-a-kind plants

Since then, Cambridge Economic Policy Associates (CEPA) and Parsons Brinckerhoff have produced a report(2) for DECC updating assumptions for solar PV costs to inform the recent consultation on feed in tariffs for solar PV. This analysis was used in the impact assessment supporting the consultation.

(1) Arup (2011), Review of the generation costs and deployment potential of renewable electricity generation technologies in the UK and Parsons Brinckerhoff (2011) Electricity Generation Cost Model—2011 Update. Both are available at:

http://www.decc.gov.uk/en/content/cms/about/ec_social_res/analytic_projs/gen_costs/gen_costs.aspx

(2) CEPA and Parsons Brinckerhoff (2011), Updates to the Feed-in tariffs model, available at:

http://www.decc.gov.uk/assets/decc/11/consultation/fits-comp-review-p1/3365-updates-to-fits-model-doc.pdf

David Mowat: To ask the Secretary of State for Energy and Climate Change what estimate he has made of the level of public subsidy received by the (a) solar, (b) onshore wind, (c) offshore wind, (d) biomass and (e) carbon capture and storage industry; and what proportion of such subsidies are funded out of (i) consumer energy bills and (ii) general taxation. [89189]

Gregory Barker: The deployment of large-scale renewable electricity generation is supported by the renewables obligation (RO) introduced in 2002. The RO places an obligation on electricity suppliers and it is expected they will pass the cost of this obligation on to their various energy customers through their electricity bills. The total level of support provided by the RO in 2010-11 was £1,285 million. Estimates have not been made for the amount of RO support received by different types of technologies in 2010-11.

Small-scale (less than 5 MW) low-carbon electricity generation is supported by the feed-in tariffs (FITs) scheme introduced on 1 April 2010. The FITs scheme is funded by the electricity suppliers and it is expected that the costs are ultimately passed on to electricity consumers. The total level of support provided by the FITs scheme in 2010-11 was £14.4 million. Estimates are not available on the amount of FITs support received by different types of technologies.

Approximately £37.7 million has been paid to the carbon capture and storage (CCS) industry to support front-end engineering and design studies as part of the CCS demonstration programme since it was established to the end of October 2011. This has been funded from general taxation. In addition £3.1 million, funded from general taxation, was spent by DECC to support a range of research and development grants for carbon abatement technologies, including CCS, in 2010-11.

18 Jan 2012 : Column 853W

DECC and a number of other bodies also receive funding from general taxation to support the research, development and demonstration of other low carbon technologies. An annual expenditure return on total low carbon technology expenditure is made to the International Energy Agency (IEA). The return does not differentiate between offshore and onshore wind and expenditure on biomass is covered under the bioenergy group of technologies. Early estimated expenditure figures provided to the IEA for 2010-11 are as follows:

  £ million

Solar

14.64

Onshore and offshore wind

63.23

Bioenergy

31.24

Energy Performance Certificates

Zac Goldsmith: To ask the Secretary of State for Energy and Climate Change what consideration he gave to including the mandatory roll-out of display energy certificates to non-residential buildings in the Carbon Plan. [89617]

Gregory Barker: The Government considered a wide range of policy options in formulating the Carbon Plan.

The Carbon Plan notes that display energy certificates (DECs) are required for (non-residential) buildings occupied by a public authority that are larger than 1,000 m(2) and are frequently visited by the public. In addition, the Government are also taking further action and are working with the commercial sector to encourage voluntary take-up in commercial buildings.

The role of DECs will soon be complemented with the introduction of the Green Deal.

Energy: Prices

Mr Watts: To ask the Secretary of State for Energy and Climate Change what discussions he has had with energy companies on the cost of energy for vulnerable customers; which companies were involved in any such discussions; and when and where any such discussions took place. [90360]

Gregory Barker: DECC Ministers and officials meet energy companies on a regular basis to discuss a range of market issues.

DECC is committed to helping people, especially low-income vulnerable households, heat their homes more affordably. This winter we are working with energy suppliers to deliver the Warm Home Discount scheme; we are also providing heating and insulation measures through Warm Front; and developing our proposals for the Green Deal and the Energy Company Obligation.

EU Law

Priti Patel: To ask the Secretary of State for Energy and Climate Change which EU (a) directives, (b) regulations and (c) other legislation affecting his Department require transposition into UK law; and what estimate he has made of the cost to (i) the public purse and (ii) the private sector of such measures. [89681]

18 Jan 2012 : Column 854W

Gregory Barker: DECC has lead responsibility for the following adopted directives which require further measures to complete their transposition into UK law:

Directive 2009/28/EC on the promotion of the use of energy from renewable sources

Directive 2009/29/EC to improve and extend the greenhouse gas emission allowance trading scheme of the Community

Directive 2009/72/EC concerning common rules for the internal market in electricity

Directive 2009/73/EC concerning common rules for the internal market in gas

Directive 2009/31/EC on the geological storage of carbon dioxide

Directive 2009/119/EC imposing an obligation to maintain minimum stocks of crude oil and/or petroleum products

Directive 2011/70/EURATOM establishing a Community framework for the responsible and safe management of spent fuel and radioactive waste

This list does not include directives for which DECC is not the lead Department or for which no further measures are considered necessary to complete their transposition into UK law.

EU regulations which may require implementing measures and for which DECC is the lead Department have not been included. Although modifications to UK legislation may be necessary as part of their implementation process, the provisions of EU regulations do not generally require transposition.

DECC does not hold a central register of other EU legislation which may require further measures to complete their transposition into UK law, but we have identified the following:

Commission Decision 2011/13/EU on certain types of information about biofuels and bioliquids to be submitted by economic operators to member states. This Commission Decision was made under directive 2009/28/EC.

Where relevant, a published impact assessment will provide an estimate of costs at the time of the transposition of directives. Impact assessments for directive 2009/28/EC, directive 2009/72/EC, directive 2009/73/EC and directive 2009/31/EC can be found at:

http://www.ialibrary.bis.gov.uk/uploaded/[email protected]@_UKRenewableEnergyStratey2009 OverallImpactAssessmenturn09D683150609.pdf

http://www.decc.gov.uk/en/content/cms/consultations/govt_response/govt_response.aspx

http://www.decc.gov.uk/en/content/cms/consultations/cons_co2_stor/cons_co2_stor.aspx

Directive 2009/29/EC is due for transposition by 31 December 2012 and an impact assessment will be published in the spring.

Directive 2009/119/EC replaces an existing directive (2006/67/EC) imposing an obligation to hold minimum stocks of crude oil and/or petroleum products, and needs to be transposed by 31 December 2012. An impact assessment is in preparation for planned publication in the spring.

The directive 2011/70/EURATOM establishing a community framework for the responsible and safe management of spent fuel and radioactive waste needs to be transposed by July 2013. DECC will be producing the transposition table and accompanying impact assessment during the summer of 2012.

18 Jan 2012 : Column 855W

Feed-in Tariffs

David Mowat: To ask the Secretary of State for Energy and Climate Change how much his Department plans to spend on feed-in tariffs in (a) 2012 and (b) 2013. [89595]

Gregory Barker: Estimates of future costs of solar PV, which make up the bulk of the total cost of the FITs scheme, are extremely uncertain. DECC is currently reviewing its estimates in the light of responses to the current consultation on PV tariffs as well as other recent changes in the market, and will provide updated assessments for the final impact assessments published alongside the post-consultation policy response.

Solar Power

Caroline Flint: To ask the Secretary of State for Energy and Climate Change pursuant to the answer of 6 December 2011, Official Report, column 216W, on solar power, whether his Department made any assumptions on the potential change in energy use in households that have installed solar PV under the feed-in tariff prior to the announcement of changes to the scheme. [89070]

Gregory Barker: We have no robust quantitative evidence from the FITs scheme to date about behavioural change in households that install solar photovoltaic (PV) systems. However, DECC is currently considering what further evidence may be needed in relation to the effects of installing microgeneration technologies on household energy use.

International Development

Equality

Mr Thomas: To ask the Secretary of State for International Development what equality impact assessments his Department has carried out since May 2010; and for what purpose in each case. [88586]

Mr Duncan: Equality impact assessments since May 2010:

Closure of Development Awareness Fund Projects, Communications Division

Festivals Outreach Activity, Communications Division

Overseas Allowance and Travel Review, HR

Voluntary Redundancy scheme for SCS, HR

Chapter Phase 1 and 2, Information Systems

DFID Pakistan: Restructure to deliver against ministerial priorities, portfolio review and BAR offer

Global Partnerships Department Change Process, Global Partnerships Department

IAD Restructure Process, Internal Audit

Termination of UCL Governance and Transparency Grant, Civil Society Department

HR Passport, HR

Bilateral Aid Review

Voluntary Redundancy scheme and Voluntary Exit scheme

In compliance with the guidance given on the Equality Act 2010, DFID streamlined its process away from Equality Impact Assessments to make it less bureaucratic during 2011. It introduced equality screening as a method

18 Jan 2012 : Column 856W

that is less burdensome and more outcomes focused. This will identify and address specific equalities requirements in people management and service delivery. The results can then be summarised in annual equality and diversity information reports.

Food Aid

Fabian Hamilton: To ask the Secretary of State for International Development (1) if he will make it his policy to endorse the Save the Children Charter to End Extreme Hunger; [90009]

(2) if he will make it his policy to endorse the Charter to End Extreme Hunger. [90010]

Mr Duncan: I refer the hon. Member to the written answers I gave to the hon. Member for Gateshead (Ian Mearns), on 17 December 2011, Official Report, column 656W.

Justice

Children

Chris Ruane: To ask the Secretary of State for Justice what research his Department has commissioned to measure the subjective well-being of children. [90151]

Mr Djanogly: The Ministry of Justice has not commissioned any research which directly measures the subjective well-being of children. However, the Department has commissioned and published a number of studies which indirectly consider children's well-being. These are listed as follows:

(1) Giovannini, E. (2011). Outcomes of Family Justice Children's Proceedings—a Review of the Evidence. Ministry of Justice, London:

http://www.justice.gov.uk/publications/research-and-analysis/moj/outcomes-family-justice.htm

(2) Cassidy, D., and Davey, S. (2011). Family Justice and Children's Proceedings—Review of Public and Private Law Case Files in England and Wales. Ministry of Justice, London:

http://www.justice.gov.uk/publications/research-and-analysis/moj/family-justice-children.htm

(3) Masson, J., Pearce, J. and Bader, K. (2008) Care profiling study. Bristol: University of Bristol. Ministry of Justice Research Series, No, 4/08:

http://www.justice.gov.uk/publications/docs/care-profiling-study.pdf

(4) Trinder, L. and Kellett, J. (2007) The longer-term outcomes of in-court conciliation. Ministry of Justice Research Series, No. 15/07, London.

(5) Trinder, L., Connolly, J., Kellet, J., Notley, C. and Swift, L. (2006), Making contact happen or making contact work? The process and outcomes of in-court conciliation, DCA Research Series, No. 3/2006, London.

(6) Trinder. L., Connolly, J., Kellett. J. and Notley. C (2005) A Profile of Applicants and Respondents in Contact Cases in Essex. DCA Research Series 1/05, London.

(7) Smart, C, May, V., Wade, A. and Furniss, C. (2005) Residence and contact disputes in court: Volume 2. DCA Research Series, No. 4/2005.

(8) Smart, C, May, V., Wade, A. and Furniss, C. (2003) Residence and contact disputes in court: Volume 1. DCA Research Series, No. 6/2003.

18 Jan 2012 : Column 857W

Where web links are not provided, reports are available on request from MOJ.

Criminal Injuries Compensation Authority

Sadiq Khan: To ask the Secretary of State for Justice how many applications for criminal injuries compensation were received in each year since 1997. [90477]

Mr Djanogly: Figures covering the specified period are shown in the following table:

Financial year Number of applications

1997-98

77,036

1998-99

78,651

1999-2000

78,742

2000-01

76,630

2001-02

78,272

2002-03

73,928

2003-04

70,595

2004-05

66,290

2005-06

63,078

2006-07

60,861

2007-08

53,290

2008-09

57,753

2009-10

65,445

2010-11

61,292

Apprentices

Mr Umunna: To ask the Secretary of State for Justice how many apprentices were employed by his Department between (a) April 2010 and March 2011 and (b) April and December 2011; and how many apprenticeships his Department will sponsor between (i) January and March 2012 and (ii) April and March 2013. [89210]

Mr Kenneth Clarke: April 2010 to March 2011 and April 2011 to December 2011 were periods of major restructuring and downsizing in the Ministry of Justice. We were unable to run any external apprentice recruitment campaigns as we did not have any vacancies which were suitable for apprenticeships during this period.

The Ministry of Justice has a well established programme of apprenticeships for its staff. The Ministry will continue to use apprenticeships to raise the skills and capability of existing staff by offering opportunities to develop transferable skills and support future recruitment.

The numbers of internal apprentices employed by the Ministry is set out in the following table.

  Number of starters per year Running total

2008-09

321

321

2009-10

412

733

2010-11

503

1,236

2011-12(1)

583

1,819

(1 )To date.

For the period January to March 2012, the Ministry has plans to sponsor 108 apprenticeships.

Officials are working with Civil Service HR and Civil Service Learning to agree the Ministry's commitment for the period from April 2012 to March 2013.

18 Jan 2012 : Column 858W

Departmental Carbon Emissions

Mr Slaughter: To ask the Secretary of State for Justice how much his Department has spent on carbon offsetting since May 2010. [89646]

Mr Djanogly: In October 2010 the Ministry of Justice (MOJ) purchased carbon credits for MOJ's air travel totalling £29,809.09. This figure covers air travel in the period of April 2009 to March 2010 plus 80% of forward purchases for April 2010—March 2011. The figure covers the main department MOJ (including the National Offender Management Service, HM Courts and Tribunals Service) and The National Archives and HM Land Registry (before the latter's move to the Department for Business, Innovation and Skills in July 2011).

NDPBs

Mr Thomas: To ask the Secretary of State for Justice pursuant to the answer of 10 January 2012, Official Report, column 278W, on non-government organisations, for what reason the (a) Criminal Injuries Compensation Authority, (b) Administrative Justice and Tribunal Council, (c) Office of the Information Commissioner, (d) Judicial Appointments Commission and (e) Commissioner for Victims and Witnesses received a reduction in funding from his Department in 2011-12 as compared to 2010-11; and if he will make a statement. [89947]

Mr Djanogly: The 2010 spending review required savings from the Ministry of Justice of well over £2 billion annually by the end of 2014-15. Some of these savings will be made through reform and efficiencies within the core Department. However, we are also working with our arm's length bodies to ensure that they produce comprehensive savings plans which demonstrate how they will contribute to the Ministry's savings while still delivering the required level of service.

We are also looking at a number of ways that the Ministry can run shared services for our arm's length bodies in line with the Ministry's operating model. This will produce further efficiencies to ensure we are getting the best value for money we can from our support functions.

The Criminal Injuries Compensation Authority received an additional one off amount of £72 million in 2010-11. This funding allowed them to settle a backlog of cases.

Departmental Official Visits

Mr Slaughter: To ask the Secretary of State for Justice what the cost to the public purse was of official visits undertaken by (a) him and (b) each Minister in his Department in 2011. [89927]

Mr Kenneth Clarke: I have provided costs of official visits for Ministers in the Ministry of Justice in the following table. These totals relate to costs incurred by ministerial offices for all external visits to non-Ministry of Justice sites and international visits for the period 1 January to 31 December 2011.

18 Jan 2012 : Column 859W

£
Minister Total costs of domestic visits to non-M O J sites Total costs of international visits Combined total cost

Kenneth Clarke

83.07

23,115.29

23,198.36

Lord McNally

1,311.02

12,447.66

13,758.68

Nick Herbert

308

0

308

Crispin Blunt

1,275.35

8,066.11

9,341.46

Jonathan Djanogly

291.11

0

291.11

Total

3,268.55

43,629.06

46,897.61

These totals include costs associated with these visits such as travel and accommodation and also include costs incurred by accompanying staff where this applies.

Fishing Catches: Fines

Mr Amess: To ask the Secretary of State for Justice (1) what the average fine was for over-fishing in the latest period for which figures are available; and if he will make a statement; [89844]

(2) how many people have been (a) prosecuted and (b) convicted for over-fishing in each (i) police area and (ii) harbour in each of the last 10 years; under what legislation each was convicted; and if he will make a statement. [89880]

Mr Blunt: The Ministry of Justice Court Proceedings Database holds information on offences provided by the statutes under which proceedings are brought but not all the circumstances of each case. It is not possible to identify from this centrally held information, of those proceedings under the Sea Fish (Conservation) Act 1967, offences specifically related to over-fishing.

Human Trafficking: Victim Support Schemes

Mr Binley: To ask the Secretary of State for Justice what the (a) nationality and (b) gender was of each suspected victim of trafficking referred to the Trafficking Victim Support Scheme in December 2011; in which constituency each such suspected victim was found; which agency referred each case; and if he will make a statement. [90131]

Mr Blunt: In December 2011 there were 21 referrals to the Government-funded support service for adult victims of human trafficking in England and Wales

18 Jan 2012 : Column 860W

administered by The Salvation Army. Details are provided in the following table. In the interests of victim safety the region in which the victim was encountered is provided rather than the parliamentary constituency.

Nationality Gender Region Referring organisation

Latvian

Female

South West

Police

Romanian

Female

West Midlands

Police

Polish

Male

South West

NGO

Polish

Female

South West

NGO

Polish

Male

Yorkshire

NGO

Albanian

Female

West Midlands

UKBA

N/K

Female

South East

Self-referral

Somali

Female

South East

Social Services

Romanian

Female

West Midlands

NHS

Albanian

Female

Yorkshire

UKBA

Equatorial Guinean/Spanish

Female

East

NGO

Nigerian

Female

London

Legal Representative

Slovakian

Female

North West

Self-referral

Somali

Female

West Midlands

Police

British

Female

North West

Police

Bangladeshi

Female

South East

NGO

Bulgarian

Female

South East

Police

Nigerian

Female

West Midlands

UKHTC

Bangladeshi

Female

South East

UKBA

Bulgarian

Female

South East

NGO

Romanian

Female

West Midlands

Police

Import Duties: Tax Evasion

Mr Amess: To ask the Secretary of State for Justice how many people have been (a) prosecuted and (b) convicted for import duty evasion in each of the last five years. [89849]

Mr Blunt: The number of defendants proceeded against at magistrates courts and found guilty at all courts for fraudulent evasion of import duty in England and Wales from 2006 to 2010 (latest available) can be viewed in the following table.

Annual court proceedings data for 2011 are planned for publication in the spring.

The figures shown in the table reflect all types of import duty evasion and not just those in relation to customs regimes.

Number of defendants proceeded against at magistrates' courts and found guilty at all courts for fraudulent evasion of import duty, England and Wales, 2006-10 (1,2,3,4)
Defendants
  2006 2007 2008 (5) 2009 2010
Offences Proceeded Convicted Proceeded Convicted Proceeded Convicted Proceeded Convicted Proceeded Convicted

Fraudulent evasion of import duty other than drugs and firearms(6)

423

348

236

276

309

262

272

235

273

185

18 Jan 2012 : Column 861W

18 Jan 2012 : Column 862W

(1) The figures given in the table on court proceedings relate to persons for whom these offences were the principal offences for which they were dealt with. When a defendant has been found guilty of two or more offences it is the offence for which the heaviest penalty is imposed. Where the same disposal is imposed for two or more offences, the offence selected is the offence for which the statutory maximum penalty is the most severe. (2) Every effort is made to ensure that the figures presented are accurate and complete. However, it is important to note that these data have been extracted from large administrative data systems generated by the courts and police forces. As a consequence, care should be taken to ensure data collection processes and their inevitable limitations are taken into account when those data are used. (3) Convictions for an offence may exceed prosecutions in the same year, as defendants may have a committal hearing at magistrates courts in one reporting period and be convicted at the Crown court in the next. The principal offence selected may also change during a set of proceedings. (4) The figures shown in the table reflect all types of import duty evasion and not just those in relation to Customs regimes. (5) Excludes data for Cardiff magistrates court for April, July and August 2008. (6) Offences under sections 50 (2) and (3), 68 (2), and 170 (1) and (2) of the Customs and Excise Management Act 1979 except where the goods concerned are drugs or firearms. Source: Justice Statistics Analytical Services—Ministry of Justice

Offenders: Bank Services

Paul Maynard: To ask the Secretary of State for Justice what estimate he has made of the proportion of prisoners who do not have a bank account upon their release. [90188]

Mr Blunt: Details of the numbers of prisoners with bank accounts is not routinely collected, and could be obtained only at disproportionate cost by collecting information held on individual prisoner records, and then collating it in a common format in order to provide a response.

Past evaluations conducted by the Legal Service Research Centre and Liverpool John Moores university found that the range of prisoners surveyed without access to a bank account or other financial products was between 40% and 69%.

Prisoners’ Home Leave

Priti Patel: To ask the Secretary of State for Justice how many requests on behalf of restricted patients to be (a) discharged and (b) permitted periods of unescorted leave have been made in each of the last five years; how many such requests were (i) granted and (ii) refused; and how many such restricted patients have a record of committing (A) sexual offences and (B) violent offences. [89738]

Mr Blunt: Higher courts may add a restriction order when making a hospital order if they are satisfied that this is necessary for the protection of the public from serious harm. A high proportion of restricted patients will have a conviction for sexual or violent offence.

Under the Mental Health Act 1983 (the 1983 Act), a restricted patient may be discharged either by the First-tier Mental Health Tribunal or by the Lord Chancellor and Secretary of State for Justice, my right hon. and learned Friend the Member for Rushcliffe (Mr Clarke). Restricted patients have the right to a review of their detention by the Tribunal every 12 months. The Tribunal will consider evidence presented by the responsible clinician for the restricted patient, alongside other clinical evidence. The Tribunal must discharge the patient if it is not satisfied that it is necessary for the protection of the patient or other that the patient be detained in hospital for treatment for a mental disorder.

The Secretary of State will discharge restricted patients into the community only if he is satisfied, based on the clinical evidence presented, that the patient no longer requires treatment in hospital and that arrangements for his safe management in the community have been made.

It is not possible to provide the information requested relating to requests for (a) discharge or (b) unescorted leave prior to 4 March 2009, the date on which an electronic caseworking system was introduced. To do so would require manual checks of 4,127 files for 196 days at disproportionate cost.

Under the 1983 Act, no restricted patient may have leave in the community without the permission of the Secretary of State. Permission for such leave is usually given at the discretion of the responsible clinician who is responsible for determining the frequency, duration and destination of such leave. Permission for unescorted community leave is granted only if, on the basis of the clinical evidence available, the Secretary of State is satisfied that such leave can be taken without putting others at risk.

The number of requests to discharge restricted patients into the community received and granted from 4 March 2009 to end December 2011 are set out in the following table.

Discharge
  Request for discharge Discharge agreed Discharge refused

4 March 2009 to 31December 2009

74

64

10

2010

110

92

18

2011

104

87

17

The number of requests to grant permission to responsible clinicians for unescorted community leave to restricted patients from 4 March 2009 to end December 2011 are set out in the following table.

Unescorted leave
  Request for unescorted community leave Permission granted Permission refused

4 March 2009 to 31 December 2009

1,439

1,309

130

2010

1,756

1,574

182

2011

1,446

1,209

237

It is not possible to provide the information requested on the number of restricted patients who have been discharged or granted unescorted leave in each of the last five years who have a record of committing sexual or violent offences, without a manual check of over 6,000 files for 150 days at disproportionate cost.

Priti Patel: To ask the Secretary of State for Justice how many restricted patients were granted unescorted leave in each of the last five years; how many such patients committed offences while on unescorted leave;

18 Jan 2012 : Column 863W

and what the name and location is of each secure unit from which such patients were on leave. [89657]

Mr Blunt: Under the Mental Health Act 1983, no restricted patient may have leave in the community without the permission of the Secretary of State. Permission for such leave is usually given at the discretion of the responsible clinician who is responsible for determining the frequency, duration and destination of such leave. Permission for unescorted community leave is granted only if, on the basis of the clinical evidence available, the Secretary of State is satisfied that such leave can be taken without putting others at risk.

It is not possible to provide the information requested relating to requests for unescorted leave prior to 4 March 2009, the date on which an electronic caseworking system was introduced. To do so would require manual checks of over 2,500 files for 60 days at disproportionate cost.

It is also not possible to provide the information required on any offences committed while on unescorted leave or on the units from which these patients were permitted leave. To do so would require manual checks of over 6,500 files for 155 days at disproportionate cost.

The number of decisions to give responsible clinicians permission to grant unescorted community leave to restricted patients from 4 March 2009 to end December 2011 is set out in the following table.

  Permission granted

4 March 2009-31 December 2009

1,309

2010

1,574

2011

1,209

18 Jan 2012 : Column 864W

Secure Accommodation

Priti Patel: To ask the Secretary of State for Justice how many restricted patients there were in secure premises in each of the last five years. [89658]

Mr Blunt: Restricted patients may be detained in any hospital. Almost all restricted patients will be detained in secure psychiatric hospitals. However, patients who no longer present a risk to others may be detained on rehabilitation or open wards.

The number of restricted patients detained in hospital in each of the past five years was as follows:

  Total number of restricted patients detained in hospital at end of year

2007

3,911

2008

4,000

2009

4,340

2010

4,446

2011

4,390

Sentencing

Sadiq Khan: To ask the Secretary of State for Justice what the average length of custodial sentence was in each year between 1995 and 2011. [90480]

Mr Blunt: The average length of custodial sentence received at all courts in England and Wales in each year between 1995 and 2010 (latest currently available) is shown in the following table.

Court proceedings data for 2011 are planned for publication in the spring.

Average custodial sentence length received for all offences at all courts In England and Wales in each year between 1995 and 2010
  Year
  1995 1996 1997 1998 1999 2000 2001 2002 2003 2004 2005 2006 2007 2008 (1) 2009 2010

Average custodial sentence length(2) (months)

12.0

12.8

12.7

11.8

11.5

11.4

11.8

12.6

12.6

12.9

12.6

12.4

12.4

13.3

13.7

13.7

(1) Excludes data for Cardiff magistrates court for April, July and August 2008. (2) Excludes life and indeterminate sentences. Notes: 1. The figures given in the table on court proceedings relate to persons for whom these offences were the principal offences for which they were dealt with. When a defendant has been found guilty of two or more offences it is the offence for which the heaviest penalty is imposed. Where the same disposal is imposed for two or more offences, the offence selected is the offence for which the statutory maximum penalty is the most severe. 2. Every effort is made to ensure that the figures presented are accurate and complete. However, it is important to note that these data have been extracted from large administrative data systems generated by the courts and police forces. As a consequence, care should be taken to ensure data collection processes and their inevitable limitations are taken into account when those data are used. Source: Justice Statistics Analytical Services within the Ministry of Justice

Health

Alzheimer's Disease: Drugs

Mr Bradshaw: To ask the Secretary of State for Health what the rate of prescription is of anti-Alzheimer's drugs per weighted population in each individual primary care trust in England. [89871]

Mr Simon Burns: The number of prescription items dispensed, by primary care trust (PCT), for the latest available 12-month period, November 2010 and October 2011, is given in the following table, together with the rate per thousand of PCT weighted population formula for 2011-12.

Number of prescription items for medicines to treat Alzheimer's disease that were prescribed in England and dispensed in the community in the United Kingdom, by PCT, November 2010 to October 2011 (1,2,3)
Primary care trust Prescription items Rate per thousand weighted population (4)

Ashton, Leigh and Wigan

10,202

27.3

18 Jan 2012 : Column 865W

Barking and Dagenham

5,998

36.7

Barnet

12,111

41.8

Barnsley

12,445

40.8

Bassetlaw

4,064

32.3

Bath and North East Somerset

9,176

57.3

Bedfordshire

8,642

22.5

Berkshire East

948

2.8

Berkshire West

591

1.6

Bexley Care Trust

6,289

31.2

Birmingham East and North

943

2.1

Blackburn with Darwen CTP

4,125

23.2

Blackpool

10,445

57.2

Bolton

8,048

26.6

Bournemouth and Poole Teaching

7,662

22.9

Bradford and Airedale Teaching

17,134

31.2

Brent Teaching

4,506

18.9

Brighton and Hove City

9,122

39.4

Bristol

16,393

40.1

Bromley

8,009

29.2

Buckinghamshire

8,709

20.3

Bury

5,053

25.5

Calderdale

7,083

32.2

Cambridgeshire

18,763

35.4

Camden

4,578

24.8

Central and Eastern Cheshire

9,414

20.0

Central Lancashire

12,635

25.7

City and Hackney Teaching

2,314

10.9

Cornwall and Isles of Scilly

12,831

21.3

County Durham

23,571

35.9

Coventry Teaching

6,989

21.0

Croydon

756

2.5

Cumbria Teaching

19,528

33.6

Darlington

8,268

71.7

Derby City

5,744

19.4

Derbyshire County

18,261

23.1

Devon

18,342

23.4

Doncaster

9,229

25.9

Dorset

7,469

17.8

Dudley

1,239

3.7

Ealing

1,321

4.4

East Lancashire Teaching

12,545

29.2

East Riding of Yorkshire

13,536

39.3

East Sussex Downs and Weald

1,203

3.4

Eastern and Coastal Kent

4,037

5.3

Enfield

7,983

32.2

Gateshead

12,040

50.8

Gloucestershire

31,625

55.4

18 Jan 2012 : Column 866W

Great Yarmouth and Waveney

9,147

35.1

Greenwich Teaching

7,680

35.8

Halton and St Helens

8,022

20.7

Hammersmith and Fulham

1,829

14.0

Hampshire

59,662

50.4

Haringey Teaching

5,896

28.4

Harrow

4,287

22.4

Hartlepool

2,778

24.2

Hastings and Rother

314

1.5

Havering

14,121

61.0

Heart of Birmingham

583

2.1

Herefordshire

3,362

17.6

Hertfordshire

4,873

5.1

Heywood, Middleton and Rochdale

6,634

28.0

Hillingdon

5,555

25.2

Hounslow

3,077

15.1

Hull Teaching

8,217

26.0

Isle of Wight NHS

5,117

31.3

Islington

3,654

21.9

Kensington and Chelsea

3,862

25.9

Kingston

5,829

41.9

Kirklees

14,594

34.1

Knowsley

1,802

9.0

Lambeth

7,623

31.7

Leeds

42,342

54.1

Leicester City

1,150

3.5

Leicestershire County and Rutland

1,283

2.1

Lewisham

7,548

33.0

Lincolnshire

36,517

45.4

Liverpool

8,695

15.4

Luton

2,663

15.3

Manchester

15,321

28.1

Medway

2,335

9.2

Mid Essex

14,009

42.5

Middlesbrough

4,202

24.0

Milton Keynes

3,235

15.1

Newcastle

14,170

49.0

Newham

9,700

40.8

Norfolk

25,679

32.8

North East Essex

8,824

25.1

North East Lincolnshire Care Trust Plus

4,758

26.4

North Lancashire Teaching

20,071

51.9

North Lincolnshire

5,043

27.3

North Somerset

8,410

38.4

North Staffordshire

6,328

27.1

North Tyneside

11,661

48.2

18 Jan 2012 : Column 867W

North Yorkshire and York

29,672

37.6

Northamptonshire Teaching

17,209

26.6

Northumberland Care Trust

13,836

36.6

Nottingham City

6,666

21.7

Nottinghamshire County Teaching

21,472

30.6

Oldham

9,945

39.3

Oxfordshire

20,789

39.1

Peterborough

5,551

36.0

Plymouth Teaching

5,869

21.2

Portsmouth City Teaching

9,525

50.0

Redbridge

11,664

51.2

Redcar and Cleveland

2,520

15.3

Richmond and Twickenham

6,739

50.6

Rotherham

10,760

35.7

Salford

11,108

39.3

Sandwell

4,530

12.9

Sefton

286

0.9

Sheffield

39,861

67.7

Shropshire County

11,206

36.7

Solihull

691

3.3

Somerset

15,670

28.5

South Birmingham

1,398

3.9

South East Essex

10,089

29.9

South Gloucestershire

9,926

44.5

South Staffordshire

15,022

24.0

South Tyneside

11,505

60.9

South West Essex

13,247

34.0

Southampton City

7,468

32.8

Southwark

6,221

27.0

Stockport

13,684

45.9.

Stockton-on-Tees Teaching

3,237

15.2

Stoke on Trent

8,743

26.9

Suffolk

23,224

39.5

Sunderland Teaching

14,085

39.7

Surrey

46,468

50.7

Sutton and Merton

12,333

40.5

Swindon

3,681

19.5

Tameside and Glossop

6,735

25.6

Telford and Wrekin

4,801

28.1

Torbay Care Trust

93

0.5

Tower Hamlets

3,837

18.2

Trafford

11,635

54.0

Wakefield District

12,370

30.2

Walsall Teaching

5,714

19.5

Waltham Forest

5,666

27.1

Wandsworth Teaching

6,808

30.3

Warrington

1,705

8.1

Warwickshire

14,844

28.1

West Essex

16,662

68.0

18 Jan 2012 : Column 868W

West Kent

1,543

2.5

West Sussex

28,474

35.9

Western Cheshire

686

2.7

Westminster

4,376

22.8

Wiltshire

2,580

6.2

Wirral

698

1.9

Wolverhampton City

1,404

5.0

Worcestershire

13,726

24.5

Unidentified

291

Total England

1,484,929

28.2

(1) Treatments for Alzheimer's disease are classified in the British National Formulary section 4.11 ‘Drugs for dementia’. Note that rivastigmine is also licensed for the treatment of dementia in Parkinson's disease. (2) The Business Services Authority, who reimburse prescriptions and from whom prescription data are obtained, also classify idebenone as a treatment for Alzheimer's disease and so prescriptions for this product (amounting to 27 items across England in the period November 2010 to October 2011) are included in the table. (3) Some PCTs provide these medicines through hospital clinics rather than through general practices. Such prescriptions amounted to an additional 154,934 items in the period November 2010 to October 2011. These prescriptions cannot be allocated to individual PCTs. (4) A weighted capitation formula is used to determine PCT recurrent revenue allocations. The formula, based on a programme of statistical and economics research, determines the target allocation for each PCT. Its current objectives, set under the previous Administration, are to support equal access for equal need and to contribute to the reduction in avoidable health inequalities. The weighted capitation formula is made up of: a count of the population served by the PCT; adjustments to reflect the need for health care, including age and other factors, such as deprivation, a component boosting allocations in areas with a low Disability Free Life Expectancy; and an adjustment to reflect unavoidable geographical differences in the cost of providing health care, the market forces factor (MMF). This is included in the weighted population formula to compensate for unavoidable geographical variations in the cost of providing services (e.g. staff, buildings, land). Since the cost of prescribed medicines does not vary geographically no adjustment for the MFF has been made. The weighted capitation formula has separate components for health and community services, prescribing and primary care. Source: Prescribing Analysis and cost tool (PACT) system