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  Pig meat (p/kg) (1) Pig meat percentage change Chicken (p/kg) (2) Chicken percentage change Feed wheat (£/tonne) Feed wheat percentage change

1990

87.0

106.0

1991

102.4

81.2

-7

117.1

10

1992

115.1

12

83.0

2

117.9

1

1993

103.0

-11

87.4

5

117.4

0

1994

99.6

-3

87.4

0

102.4

-13

1995

118.8

19

84.2

-4

110.2

8

1996

137.7

16

91.0

8

111.0

1

1997

110.8

-20

86.2

-5

89.0

-20

1998

80.7

-27

76.7

-11

75.0

-16

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1 Feb 2012 : Column 668W

1999

78.5

-3

72.1

-6

73.0

-3

2000

94.2

20

70.5

-2

65.9

-10

2001

97.8

4

71.0

1

70.7

7

2002

93.3

-5

69.7

-2

67.0

-5

2003

102.7

10

72.2

4

68.7

3

2004

102.9

0

74.1

3

77.8

13

2005

102.9

0

73.2

-1

66.4

-15

2006

104.2

1

71.9

-2

71.7

8

2007

107.1

3

77.4

8

99.0

38

2008

126.3

18

97.5

26

126.6

28

2009

145.7

15

101.3

4

107.8

-15

2010 (provisional)

141.7

-3

104.3

3

112.6

4

(1 )Clean pigs—pence per kg deadweight. (2) Chicken and other table fowls—pence per kg carcase weight. Source: Agriculture in the United Kingdom

Agriculture: Employment

Tim Farron: To ask the Secretary of State for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs what estimate she has made of the number of people aged between 16 and 25 entering employment in the farming industry in each of the last five years. [92978]

Mr Paice: DEFRA does not hold this information.

Agriculture: Exports

Caroline Flint: To ask the Secretary of State for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs with reference to the meeting of the right hon. Member for Don Valley with the Minister of State responsible for agriculture and food on 25 October 2011, what the membership of the project board overseeing the review entitled Third Country Exports Facilitation Project is; and what progress has been made on the review. [92892]

Mr Paice: The board for this project is chaired by the Deputy Chief Veterinary Officer. Board members include: the British Poultry Council, Export Certification Limited, the Provision Trade Federation, the British Equestrian Federation, the devolved Administrations, the Chief Veterinary Officer's office, and representation from core DEFRA's and Animal Health and Veterinary Laboratories Agency's export certification teams. The project is identifying how the export certification service for animals and animal products at core DEFRA and the Animal Health and Veterinary Laboratories Agency might be improved with a view to introducing changes from this autumn. It is also exploring options for transferring functions from Government to industry; how best to govern export certification work, and how the certification service should be funded. We expect to consult formally on proposals later this year.

Agriculture: Subsidies

Miss McIntosh: To ask the Secretary of State for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs what assessment she has made of the position of tenant farmers for the purposes of stewardship schemes under the Common Agricultural Policy in (a) England, (b) Scotland, (c) Wales and (d) Northern Ireland; and what information her Department holds on the application of single farm payments to tenants in other EU member states. [89313]

Mr Paice: At this early stage in the CAP reform negotiation process, it is not possible to assess with any degree of accuracy the likely impact on tenant farmers.

I have, however, pledged to do everything possible to make sure farmers are not disadvantaged because they have been ahead of the game on environmental management (such as having an Entry Level Stewardship agreement). If changes do have to be made to these agreements, we will want to make sure that farmers will be able to opt out without penalty.

DEFRA does not hold information on the application of single farm payments to tenants in other EU member states.

Animal Welfare: Circuses

Kerry McCarthy: To ask the Secretary of State for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs with reference to the recent ruling of the Austrian Constitutional Court discussing an application brought by Circus Krone to challenge Austria's ban on the use of wild animals in circuses, what steps her Department will take to introduce a ban on the use of wild animals in circuses. [92617]

Mr Paice: As previously explained to the House, we are minded to introduce a ban, but have to be sure that a ban cannot be overturned by legal challenge. The implications of the Austrian court judgment for the situation here are being considered very carefully. In the meantime, we are proposing a tough new licensing regime, which can be introduced quickly, to ensure high welfare standards.

Deer Farms

Jim Shannon: To ask the Secretary of State for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs what steps she is taking to promote deer farms. [92351]

1 Feb 2012 : Column 669W

Mr Paice: Deer farming is a viable part of the UK's agricultural industry. Land on which deer are reared is eligible to support payment claims under the Single Payment Scheme and deer farmers may also claim under a range of schemes set out in the UK rural development programme relevant to them. However, DEFRA has no plans actively to promote deer farms at present.

Fruit

Chris Ruane: To ask the Secretary of State for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs what information

1 Feb 2012 : Column 670W

her Department holds on how many portions of

(a)

fresh fruit and

(b)

vegetables the average person in each socio-economic grouping consumes per day. [91992]

Mr Paice: DEFRA holds information on food purchases by socio-economic groupings. The following table is calculated from fruit and vegetable purchases for household supplies. It excludes potatoes and excludes fruit and vegetables contained in composite products and eaten out. A portion size is taken to be 80 grams based on purchase weight. It is a broad approximation to consumption of five a day portions.

National Statistics Socio-Economic Classification (NS SEC), 2010
  Average number of portions per person per day
  Fresh fruit Processed fruit and fruit products (including fruit juice) Fresh vegetables Processed vegetables

Employers in large organisations, higher managerial and professional occupations

1.5

0.9

1.5

0.6

Employers in small organisations, own account workers

1.5

0.7

1.5

0.6

Higher professional occupations

1.8

0.9

1.7

0.6

Intermediate occupations

1.1

0.7

1.2

0.7

Lower professional and managerial and higher technical and supervisory occupations

1.3

0.7

1.4

0.7

Lower supervisory and technical occupations

1.1

0.6

1.1

0.5

Never worked, long term unemployed and unclassified

0.6

0.4

0.7

0.6

Routine

0.9

0.5

1.1

0.6

Semi-routine

1.0

0.4

1.1

0.5

Source: Living Costs and Food Survey, DEFRA/ONS

Veterinary Services

Mr Amess: To ask the Secretary of State for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs what estimate she has made of the number of veterinary surgeons in England and Wales; and if she will make a statement. [92148]

Mr Paice: As of 25 January 2012, the number of veterinary surgeons currently registered with the Royal College of Veterinary Surgeons as UK (Home) Practising is 18,529. Figures are not held separately for England and Wales and to provide them would incur a disproportionate cost.

Foreign and Commonwealth Office

Afghanistan: Politics and Government

Jim Shannon: To ask the Secretary of State for Foreign and Commonwealth Affairs what recent reports he has received of intimidation of politicians and other senior officials in Afghanistan. [92299]

Alistair Burt: Insurgency intimidation and targeting of Afghan politicians is a matter for the Afghan Government and local law enforcement. The UK, through International Security Assistance Force, continues to help develop the capability of the Afghanistan National Security Forces to enable them to provide security and protect all Afghan people.

Bahrain: Overseas Workers

Graham Jones: To ask the Secretary of State for Foreign and Commonwealth Affairs (1) what recent discussions he has had with the government of Bahrain on allowing expatriate workers to work in order to repay debts. [92446]

(2) What recent discussions he has had with the government of Bahrain on expatriate workers currently detained there as a result of debts. [92447]

Alistair Burt: The issue of travel bans, including in Bahrain, is one we take seriously. Our approach to travel bans is outlined in Support for British Nationals: A Guide, a copy of which was sent to you in September 2011. As Foreign and Commonwealth Office travel advice for Bahrain and elsewhere in the Middle East makes clear, non-payment of debt is viewed very seriously by host Governments, and travel bans can often be imposed. My right hon. Friend the Secretary of State for Foreign and Commonwealth Affairs raised this issue with the Crown Prince in November 2010. I raised it with the Ministry of Foreign Affairs when I visited in December. Our embassy is in regular contact with those British nationals affected by travel bans, and continue to raise those cases with members of the Bahraini Government. We will continue to do all we can to urge the authorities to allow British nationals to be able to live and work legally in Bahrain while subject to a travel ban.

1 Feb 2012 : Column 671W

Cyprus: Arms Control

Martin Horwood: To ask the Secretary of State for Foreign and Commonwealth Affairs what reports his Department has received on the release of a Russian cargo ship containing a consignment of munitions destined for Syria by Cypriot authorities on 11 January 2012; what representations he has made to the Government of Cyprus on this matter; and if he will raise this issue as part of the review of the EU Common Position defining common rules governing control of exports of military technology and equipment. [92770]

Mr Lidington [holding answer 31 January 2012]: We understand that on 10 January a Russian owned cargo ship loaded with munitions refuelled at a Cypriot port, after which we understand it travelled to Syria. When challenged by the Cypriot authorities assurances were given that the ship would travel on to Turkey.

On the information available to the UK Government this appears to be a breach of EU restrictive measures (sanctions) against Syria. I raised our concerns with the Cypriot Foreign Minister on 25 January. We are also discussing the matter with EU partners.

It may be appropriate to further clarify in the EU the interpretation of the Syria restrictive measures. We will consider whether any lessons learnt from this incident should be incorporated into the wider review of the EU Common Position.

Martin Horwood: To ask the Secretary of State for Foreign and Commonwealth Affairs if his Department will raise the recent Russian trans-shipment of arms through Cyprus as an urgent matter at the next meeting of the EU Working Party on conventional arms exports. [92771]

Mr Lidington [holding answer 31 January 2012]: On the information available to the UK Government this appears to be a breach of EU restrictive measures (sanctions) against Syria. I raised our concerns with the Cypriot Foreign Minister on 25 January.

We are discussing the matter with EU partners. It may be appropriate to further clarify in the EU the interpretation of the Syria restrictive measures. However, the agenda and minutes of meetings of the European Union Council Working Group on Conventional Arms Exports (COARM) are not made publicly available and are restricted in order to enable full and frank discussion of export control policy issues by the representatives of EU member states.

Diego Garcia: Aviation

Mr Tyrie: To ask the Secretary of State for Foreign and Commonwealth Affairs what records are kept by the UK authorities of flights landing on Diego Garcia in March 2004. [92396]

1 Feb 2012 : Column 672W

Mr Bellingham: The UK does not hold any flight manifest information on flights which landed in Diego Garcia in March 2004. British Indian Ocean Territory immigration authorities hold immigration cards for civilians arriving in Diego Garcia during that period.

Egypt: Elections

Ian Lucas: To ask the Secretary of State for Foreign and Commonwealth Affairs what assessment he has made of the potential effect of the outcome of the Egyptian elections on the middle east peace process. [92692]

Alistair Burt: The historic elections for the People's Assembly, and first sitting of the Lower House on 23 January, were important steps in Egypt's political transition. The Muslim Brotherhood's Democratic Alliance, which has emerged as the leading political grouping in the new Egyptian Lower House, has publicly committed to honouring all existing international treaties and agreements, including with Israel. We will urge all political parties in Egypt to play their part in supporting the middle east peace process, including by encouraging all stakeholders to engage constructively.

Egypt: Human Rights

Ian Lucas: To ask the Secretary of State for Foreign and Commonwealth Affairs what recent discussions he has had with the Egyptian Government on human rights. [92691]

Alistair Burt: Ministers have raised our concerns about human rights issues with the Egyptian authorities at every opportunity. My right hon. Friend the Secretary of State for Foreign and Commonwealth Affairs spoke to the Egyptian Foreign Minister on 24 November 2011 to express his concern about the violence in Cairo, and urged the authorities to respect the right to peaceful protest. In statements in November and December, he expressed his deep concern about the violent clashes, and called for the Egyptian authorities to hold those responsible to account and release those detained for peacefully expressing their views.

The Deputy Prime Minister called on the Egyptian authorities to end the state of emergency, tackle the causes of sectarian tension and lobbied on the case of the arrested blogger Maikel Nabil Sanad, during his visit to Egypt in October.

The Minister of State, Foreign and Commonwealth Affairs, the hon. Member for Taunton Deane (Mr Browne), issued a statement on 30 December 2011 in which he expressed our concerns about the raids against NGOs. He urged the Egyptian authorities to avoid taking action that would render the democratic process less inclusive. In discussions with the Egyptian Ministry of Foreign Affairs on 24 January 2012, our ambassador in Cairo emphasised the need for transparent and consultative regulation of civil society.

Freedom of Information

Jonathan Ashworth: To ask the Secretary of State for Foreign and Commonwealth Affairs whether his Department publishes on its website its response to

1 Feb 2012 : Column 673W

each request it receives under the Freedom of Information Act 2000; whether the response is published in the same part of its website on each occasion; and what the average time taken is between responding to a request and the information being made available on the website. [92114]

Mr Lidington: The Foreign and Commonwealth Office (FCO) draws on the Information Commissioner's policy on publishing freedom of information responses, as set out on the Commissioner's website. The FCO publishes replies that are of wider public interest, on the same part of its website on each occasion, and aims to do so within four weeks of the reply to a request. The average time taken between responding to a request and the information being made available on the website is available only at disproportionate cost.

Friends of Yemen

Michael Connarty: To ask the Secretary of State for Foreign and Commonwealth Affairs when he last met the Friends of Yemen; and when he next expects a meeting to take place. [92535]

Alistair Burt: We last convened Friends of Yemen on 24 September 2010 during the UN General Assembly in New York. The follow up meeting in Riyadh in March 2011 was suspended at Yemeni request due to ongoing protests and violence. We will discuss with our co-chair, Saudi Arabia, when to convene the next meeting. We hope it will be soon after the interim presidential elections to support the new Yemeni Government in national reconciliation and political reform.

Haiti: Foreign Aid

Jeremy Corbyn: To ask the Secretary of State for Foreign and Commonwealth Affairs whether his Department provides support to non-governmental human rights groups in Haiti; what information his Department holds on whether any support to such groups is provided multi-laterally through the EU; and if he will make a statement. [92093]

Mr Jeremy Browne: The Foreign and Commonwealth Office provides some targeted support to non-governmental human rights groups in Haiti. Through our bilateral programme budget we are currently supporting the child rights organisation, Plan International, with a project to provide media training to young Haitians and spread messages about child rights. We also have a regular dialogue with human rights organisations in Haiti and raise human rights issues both directly with the Haitian Government and at the UN. UK development support to Haiti is channelled through our contributions to multilateral organisations such as the UN, EU, World Bank and Caribbean Development Bank. Since the earthquake in January 2010, the EU has provided over €100 million, including support to human rights and democracy groups.

Libya: Elections

Ian Lucas: To ask the Secretary of State for Foreign and Commonwealth Affairs what assessment he has made of the (a) prospects for and (b) likely timing of elections in Libya. [92690]

1 Feb 2012 : Column 674W

Alistair Burt: The National Transitional Council set out the roadmap for elections in their Constitutional Declaration of 21 June 2011. This included the target of National Congress elections within 240 days of the declaration of national liberation, in other words by June 2012, with legislative elections to follow in April 2013. We welcome the efforts made by the Transitional Government so far to achieve these targets, including the publication of a draft Elections Law for public consultation on 2 January and appointment of an Elections Commission on 22 January. The final Elections Law is expected to be published shortly.

We encourage the Transitional Government to adhere as closely as possible to their target of holding elections this summer in which Libyan society will be able to participate fully. We are pleased that the organisers are working closely with UN advisers to help them realise this goal.

Occupied Territories: Housing

Caroline Lucas: To ask the Secretary of State for Foreign and Commonwealth Affairs what representations he has made to the Israeli Government following the demolition of the homes of Bedouins in Anata in the west bank on 23 January 2012. [92955]

Alistair Burt: We are concerned at reports that Bedouin families were forcibly displaced from their homes at Anata on 23 January. Demolitions of Palestinian homes in the west bank are illegal and deeply unhelpful to efforts to bring a lasting peace to the middle east conflict.

I most recently raised concerns over plans to move west bank Bedouin communities during my visit to Israel and the Occupied Palestinian Territories on 7-10 January. I visited the Bedouin community school at Khan al Ahmar to give profile to this issue and subsequently discussed it with Deputy Foreign Minister Danny Ayalon on 9 January. Our officials at the embassy in Tel Aviv regularly discuss our concerns with the Israeli authorities.

The Israeli authorities state that they are yet to finalise their plans and will consult fully with Bedouin communities before moving ahead. The UK continues to encourage the Israeli Government to carry through on this commitment, to comply fully with their obligations under international law and to ensure that any decision reached on the movement of Bedouin communities should be made with their full consent and not result in a forcible transfer.

Our officials at the British embassy in Tel Aviv are monitoring this situation closely. While they have not raised the specific issue of Anata with the Israeli authorities yet, they are planning to do so.

Yemen: Foreign Relations

Michael Connarty: To ask the Secretary of State for Foreign and Commonwealth Affairs when he last met Ali Abdullah Saleh, former President of Yemen; and what plans he has to meet President Hadi. [92539]

Alistair Burt: My right hon. Friend the Secretary of State for Foreign and Commonwealth Affairs last met President Saleh on 9 February 2011 during a brief

1 Feb 2012 : Column 675W

official visit. I am not aware of plans by the Secretary of State for Foreign and Commonwealth Affairs to travel to Yemen in 2012. I look forward to meeting the new Yemeni Head of State at the soonest available opportunity. Security constrains our freedom to travel and I am not able to reveal details of my overseas trips.

Health

Benzodiazepines

Eric Ollerenshaw: To ask the Secretary of State for Health pursuant to the answer of 23 January 2012, Official Report, column 64W, on benzodiazepines, how the guidance is made available to women; and what services are available to support people who wish to cease using the product. [92575]

Mr Simon Burns: The patient information leaflet which accompanies each benzodiazepine medicine includes clear advice on stopping treatment and on use during pregnancy to supplement advice from the prescriber. For benzodiazepines indicated for long term use in the management of epilepsy, any decision to stop treatment should be taken only after discussion with a health care professional.

Guidance for prescribers is contained in the Summary of Product Characteristics. Health care professionals can also access guidance relating to the use of benzodiazepines in the British National Formulary provided free to all prescribers in the national health service.

If a woman experiences problems in stopping the medicine she may be further supported by her general practitioner or specialist as appropriate.

Disability: Children

Chris Ruane: To ask the Secretary of State for Health if he will take steps to ensure that all disabled children have access to a dedicated assistant to help them take part in activities, such as trips and physical activities. [92365]

Sarah Teather: I have been asked to reply on behalf of the Department for Education.

Schools and local authorities have duties, which are now requirements of the Equality Act 2010, not to discriminate against a disabled pupil regarding their education and associated services, including school trips, and to take reasonable steps to avoid such discrimination.

Government do not dictate a particular model of provision to support disabled children and their families: decisions are made locally by local authorities and the health service. The Government's approach to improving services and outcomes for disabled children is set out in their Green Paper: “Support and aspiration: A new approach to special educational needs and disability”. 20 pathfinders have been appointed to test the proposals in the Green Paper, including giving parents more control, parents being better informed about the support that is available and their rights as well as trialling personal budgets for those who want them.

Local authorities are under a duty to provide a range of short breaks, which allow parents and carers of disabled children to find time to do normal things which other families take for granted.

1 Feb 2012 : Column 676W

Drugs: Prices

Mark Durkan: To ask the Secretary of State for Health (1) what plans he has for the use of value-based pricing for the Cancer Drugs Fund; what agreement he has reached with each devolved administration on a timetable for the adoption of value-based pricing; and if he will make a statement; [92542]

(2) what safeguards he plans to put in place together with the devolved administrations to ensure that existing standards and best practice for drugs pricing are maintained across jurisdictions after the adoption of value-based pricing. [92544]

Mr Simon Burns: The Cancer Dugs Fund (CDF) operates in England only but, when introduced, it is planned that value-based pricing (VBP) will apply United Kingdom wide.

We are working with colleagues in the devolved Administrations on our plans to introduce a system of VBP for medicines, and will continue to do so as this work progresses. The new system of VBP will be introduced from January 2014, following the end of the 2009 pharmaceutical price regulation scheme.

We want to find a way in which patients who would benefit from drugs provided through the CDF can continue to do so, at a cost that represents value to the national health service, after the CDF ends in 2014. We are considering whether it would be sensible to assess some of these drugs under the new VBP arrangements when they are introduced, but a decision on this has not yet been made.

We will ensure that there are arrangements in place to protect individual patients who are receiving treatment with drugs funded by the CDF as the end of the fund approaches.

Drugs: Rehabilitation

Margot James: To ask the Secretary of State for Health with reference to his proposal that Public Health England should be given responsibility for all drug recovery budgets, what plans he has to confer on Public Health England a duty to reduce (a) reoffending and (b) crime rates. [92736]

Anne Milton: The Department is working closely with the Ministry of Justice, the Home Office and other partners to help manage the transition to new public health and criminal justice arrangements. This is overseen by a cross-Government Health and Criminal Justice Programme Board and an Offender Substance Misuse Board.

Subject to parliamentary approval local authorities will be responsible for commissioning drug treatment services in the new public health system. Funding for this will come from a public health ring-fenced grant. Giving local authorities responsibility for commissioning drug and alcohol prevention and recovery orientated treatment services will bring together treatment provision and the wide range of local services that help promote and sustain recovery. This will help reduce health risks and cut crime and make our society safer. These goals are reflected in the Public Health outcomes framework published on 23 January 2012 which includes indicators on completion of drug treatment, reoffending, as well

1 Feb 2012 : Column 677W

as a number of related indicators. Local areas will determine how they wish to improve outcomes in these areas based on the joint assessment of local needs.

Further, Public Health England will be established as an executive agency of the Department. Its role will be to support local commissioners with expert advice, evidence and management information including outcomes and value for money data. This will help promote effective prevention and treatment services integrated with local health, crime, housing and employment agencies.

Subject to parliamentary approval, the responsibility for commissioning substance misuse treatment services people in prison and other places of prescribed detention will lie with the National Health Service Commissioning Board, under an agreement between the Secretary of State and the NHS Commissioning Board.

Family Planning

Jim Fitzpatrick: To ask the Secretary of State for Health what guidance his Department gives to primary care trusts on levels of expenditure on family planning services. [92969]

Anne Milton: Funding for local services is a matter for individual primary care trusts (PCTs), taking into account the needs of the local population. The amount spent by PCTs on sexual health services is not prescribed by the Department.

Fractures: Care Homes

Mike Weatherley: To ask the Secretary of State for Health whether he plans to produce a national standard for care homes on the prevention, treatment and care of fractures resulting from osteoporosis and falls. [91458]

Paul Burstow: The Health and Social Care Bill makes provision for the National Institute for Health and Clinical Excellence (NICE) to produce Quality Standards that relate to social care, which would potentially include care homes. Our engagement exercise—Caring for Our Future: Shared ambitions for care and support—sought to understand people's priorities for reform to help inform the approach to be set out in the forthcoming White Paper on adult social care. Responses to the engagement in relation to quality welcomed planned work to extend NICE Quality Standards to social care, and highlighted the potential role clinical audit practice might play in driving up quality in the sector. The Government are now considering these proposals before they set out their plans in their White Paper on care and support.

Fractures: Databases

Mike Weatherley: To ask the Secretary of State for Health if he will commission a real-time national audit of all non-hip fragility fractures as part of the re-tender for the National Hip Fracture Database and the national audit of falls and bone health in older people. [91457]

Paul Burstow: The re-tender for the National Hip Fracture Database and the National Audit of Falls and Bone health in Older People includes a requirement to

1 Feb 2012 : Column 678W

conduct a feasibility study regarding all non-hip fragility fractures. The feasibility study will allow a decision to be made regarding the future commissioning of such a database.

Herbal Medicine

Simon Reevell: To ask the Secretary of State for Health (1) how many herbal medicinal products were under investigation by the Medicines and Healthcare products Regulatory Agency for being sold as food supplements on the most recent date for which information is available; when each such investigation began; when he expects each investigation to reach a judgement; and if he will make a statement; [92524]

(2) whether the Medicines and Healthcare products Regulatory Agency has investigated the sale of any herbal medicinal products as food supplements in Holland and Barrett stores in the last six months; and if he will make a statement; [92525]

(3) how many complaints the Medicines and Healthcare products Regulatory Agency has received about the sale of herbal medicinal products in Holland and Barrett stores which do not comply with the EU Directive on Traditional Herbal Medicinal Products in each of the last six months; and if he will make a statement. [92526]

Mr Simon Burns: The Medicines and Healthcare products Regulatory Agency (MHRA) does not hold information on how many herbal medicines have been presented as food supplements. The MHRA is currently investigating complaints about 25 companies selling some 174 herbal products which may fall within the definition of a medicine. The time taken to process a complaint will depend on the complexity of the case, the number of products involved and the response from the company concerned.

Companies that are investigated by the MHRA are entitled to their privacy especially where, following investigation, no subsequent enforcement action is taken against them. The MHRA considers that it would not be in the public interest to publish the names of companies where no breach of legislation has been identified or where there is compliance with regulatory requirements; such an approach could also have legal implications. Where a case results in a final determination that a product is a medicine, this information appears on the MHRA website. The MHRA is currently considering how effective, proportionate enforcement action can best ensure that the intended benefits of the directive on traditional herbal medicinal products for consumers and for companies compliant with the legislation are achieved.

Hospitals: Inspections

Mr David Davis: To ask the Secretary of State for Health what role Local Involvement Networks (LINks) and local HealthWatch organisations will play in relation to patient-led inspections; and whether LINks are involved in their planning and piloting. [92972]

Mr Simon Burns: Local Involvement Networks (LINks) are independent, as local HealthWatch (LHW) will be when they come into being, and therefore the exact role they play will depend on local decision making. However,

1 Feb 2012 : Column 679W

the new inspection system will ensure that, where they wish to be involved, they have the opportunity to play a leading role.

The patient-led inspection pilots will be developed by the Department's Steering Group and will involve patients and their representatives. This includes working in collaboration with LINks who have the expertise in ‘enter and view’, and involving HealthWatch England and LHW as soon as they come into being. LINks and HealthWatch will play a pivotal role during planning, the pilots and delivery, to ensure the new system focus remains on what patients want.

Mental Health Services: Children

Chris Ruane: To ask the Secretary of State for Health if he will take steps to ensure that a child and adolescent mental health service worker or child psychologist is attached to every school. [92362]

Sarah Teather: I have been asked to reply on behalf of the Department for Education.

The Government recognise the important and valued role schools play in supporting children's mental health. We are clear that the education system needs to work effectively with the health service to identify and support children who have serious or complex mental health problems. Ultimately, what kind of support is required and where that support is delivered is a matter for local decision, based on local need. It is for health and education bodies to work together to determine when that support should be delivered directly in schools. Schools can also use their own budgets to purchase services to meet the needs of pupils, including supporting pupils' emotional and mental health. Funding for these types of support is included in the Department's Early Intervention Grant (EIG) to local authorities.

Obesity: Surgery

Keith Vaz: To ask the Secretary of State for Health what the NHS budget is for bariatric surgery. [92901]

Anne Milton: The Department does not hold information on the cost to primary care trusts (PCTs) of providing patients with bariatric surgery. It is up to PCTs to commission a range of health care services for their population, based on clinical need and effectiveness.

Organs: Donors

Tim Farron: To ask the Secretary of State for Health how many people were added to the organ donor register in (a) England, (b) the north-west and (c) Cumbria in each of the last five years. [92985]

Anne Milton: The information requested is in the following table:

Number of registrations on the organ donor register (ODR) in England, the North West Strategic Health Authority and Cumbria, 1 January 2007 to 31 December 2011, by year
Year of registration (1) England (2) North-west (2) Cumbria (2)

2007

826,576

103,641

7,990

2008

905,947

116,645

8,284

2009

849,763

100,773

8,202

1 Feb 2012 : Column 680W

2010

901,224

110,655

9,162

2011

820,083

94,880

8,133

Current total(3)

15,028,160

1,884,824

143,950

(1) This is based on registrants on the ODR as at 30 January 2012 and excludes people who registered in this time period and have subsequently died or been removed from the ODR. (2) Areas defined from the Office for National Statistics postcode datasets. (3) The current total number of registrations on the ODR as at 30 January 2012. Source: NHS Blood and Transplant

Osteoporosis: Health Services

Mike Weatherley: To ask the Secretary of State for Health if he will advise general practitioners to use the FRAX fracture risk assessment tool in order to meet the conditions required by the Quality and Outcomes Framework osteoporosis indicators. [91456]

Paul Burstow: The prioritisation and development of potential indicators for inclusion in the Quality and Outcomes Framework (QOF) is the responsibility of the National Institute for Health and Clinical Excellence and its independent Primary Care QOF Indicator Advisory Committee.

The current osteoporosis indicators focus on the secondary prevention of fragility fractures and do not specify how patients at risk of fragility fracture should be identified.

Pain

Mrs Riordan: To ask the Secretary of State for Health whether it is his policy that chronic pain is a long-term condition that requires the preparation of care plans. [92547]

Paul Burstow: The Department recognises chronic pain as a long-term condition, either in its own right or as a component of other long-term conditions. Everyone who suffers persistent pain should have a timely assessment in order to determine the cause of the pain—if a cause can be determined—and to advise on options for treatment, including self-help. Patients with refractory chronic pain will benefit from the care planning approach, but decisions should be taken on an individual basis depending on the severity of symptoms and any co-morbidities.

Parents: Education

Chris Ruane: To ask the Secretary of State for Health what recent progress his Department has made on the national roll-out of free parenting classes for parents with children under five. [92311]

Sarah Teather: I have been asked to reply on behalf of the Department for Education.

The Department announced on 18 October 2011 that a trial of universal parenting classes for mothers and fathers of children 0 to five years will run from spring 2012 in three areas (Middlesbrough, High Peak (Derbyshire), and the London borough of Camden)

1 Feb 2012 : Column 681W

aimed at over 50,000 parents. The trial will test how best a commercial market in parenting classes for all parents can be established.

The aim is to stimulate the supply and demand for parenting classes by offering parents a range of classes in different formats such as face to face and online. Parents will be provided with vouchers during the trial which they can use to redeem the parenting classes.

The procurement exercise for organisations to provide parenting classes in the trial was launched on 7 November 2011 and a further procurement exercise for the local support and voucher provider role was launched on 9 December 2011. The outcome of these processes will be announced soon.

Seroxat

Eric Ollerenshaw: To ask the Secretary of State for Health pursuant to the answer of 23 January 2012, Official Report, column 73W, on paroxetine, if he will quantify the magnitude of the small increased risks identified in the circumstances described in the Answer. [92574]

Mr Simon Burns: Observational studies suggest about two in 100 babies whose mothers take paroxetine in early pregnancy are born with a birth defect, in particular a heart-related defect. This compares with about one in 100 babies born to women who have not taken paroxetine. For an individual woman, the magnitude of the risk following exposure to paroxetine in the first trimester of pregnancy is difficult to estimate because several risk factors exist for birth defects, including smoking and other dietary and lifestyle factors.

For persistent pulmonary hypertension of the newborn (PPHN), observational studies suggest that about five in 1,000 babies born to mothers who have taken an antidepressant of the same type as paroxetine (selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors or SSRIs), particularly in late pregnancy, develop this condition. This compares to about one to two cases of PPHN in 1,000 babies born to women not exposed to SSRIs during pregnancy.

Any increase in risk to the foetus due to paroxetine is small and needs to be considered in the context of the potentially greater risk that may result from the mother's untreated depression. The product information for paroxetine, including the patient information leaflet, outlines these small risks to support discussion between health care professionals and patients.

Surgery

Dr Wollaston: To ask the Secretary of State for Health how many finished consultant episodes there were (a) for males and (b) in total for (i) hip replacement, (ii) knee replacement, (iii) coronary artery bypass graft, (iv) cochlea implant and (v) cholecystectomy procedures for patients aged (A) 15 to 39, (B) 40 to 49, (C) 50 to 54, (D) 55 to 59, (E) 60 to 64, (F) 65 to 69, (G) 70 to 74 and (H) over 75 years in each of the last three years for which figures are available. [92578]

Mr Simon Burns: The available information is shown in the following tables, which show the total number of finished consultant episodes (FCE)(1) and FCEs where

1 Feb 2012 : Column 682W

the patient gender is ‘male’ with main operative procedure

(2)

as specified by patient age group for 2008-09, 2009-10 and 2010-11.

The information provided includes activity in English NHS hospitals and English NHS commissioned activity in the independent sector.

Hip replacement
  2008-09 2009-10 2010-11
Patient age group Total FCEs Male Total FCEs Male Total FCEs Male

15-39

1,218

538

1,227

547

1,298

624

40-49

2,767

1,266

2,959

1,380

3,237

1,458

50-54

3,266

1,394

3,398

1,421

3,819

1,597

55-59

5,753

2,435.

5,655

2,331

6,166

2,662

60-64

10,202

4,272

10,091

4,243

10,998

4,658

65-69

12,785

5,056

12,630

5,068

13,370

5,399

70-74

16,198

6,180

16,297

6,144

16,523

6,172

75 and over

48,233

13,898

48,685

14,381

50,477

15,175

Knee replacement
  2008-09 2009-10 2010-11
Patient age g roup Total FCEs Male Total FCEs Male Total FCEs Male

15-39

244

94

221

87

182

79

40-49

1,816

765

1,641

703

1,619

676

50-54

3,233

1,320

2,937

1,180

3,103

1,319

55-59

6,539

2,690

5,751

2,440

5,932

2,473

60-64

11,650

5,334

11,113

5,086

11,455

5,227

65-69

13,626

6,232

12,974

5,919

13,572

6,204

70-74

15,361

6,686

14,557

6,432

15,171

6,496

75 and over

24,373

9,545

23,469

9,416

24,201

9,648

Coronary artery bypass graft
  2008-09 2009-10 2010-11
Patient age group Total FCEs Male Total FCEs Male Total FCEs Male

15-39

14

11

10

7

16

10

40-49

89

75

84

66

75

58

50-54

122

91

99

77

96

77

55-59

237

189

207

178

175

140

60-64

396

316

309

253

280

222

65-69

517

365

403

309

410

291

70-74

626

428

612

418

484

339

75 and over

1,280

817

1454

748

1,126

729

Cochlear implant
  2008-09 2009-10 2010-11
Patient age group Total FCEs Male Total FCEs Male Total FCEs Male

15-39

112

47

110

37

133

49

40-49

53

23

62

26

85

33

50-54

39

13

27

16

41

20

55-59

40

13

33

11

29

10

60-64

40

16

43

18

38

23

65-69

47

26

33

16

43

17

70-74

45

27

35

20

32

13

75 and over

62

34

58

28

58

31

1 Feb 2012 : Column 683W

Cholecystectomy
  2008-09 2009-10 2010-11
Patient age group Total FCEs Male Total FCEs Male Total FCEs Male

15-39

15,272

1,859

16,136

1,897

16,881

2,074

40-49

11,615

2,512

12,197

2,640

12,699

2,798

50-54

5,736

1,473

6,080

1,583

6,372

1,625

55-59

5,851

1,596

5,900

1,647

5,903

1,695

60-64

6,389

1,929

6,636

2,044

6,728

2,068

65-69

5,012

1,759

5,353

1,868

5,501

1,899

70-74

4,369

1,770

4,531

1,769

4,546

1,757

75 and over

4,930

1,949

5,101

2,097

5,103

2,063

(1) A finished consultant episode (FCE) is a continuous period of admitted patient care under one consultant within one health care provider. FCEs are counted against the year in which they end. Figures do not represent the number of different patients, as a person may have more than one episode of care within the same stay in hospital or in different stays in the same year. (2) The first recorded procedure or intervention in each episode, usually the most resource intensive procedure or intervention performed during the episode. It is appropriate to use main procedure when looking at admission details, but a more complete count of episodes with a particular procedure is obtained by looking at the main and the secondary procedures.

Dr Wollaston: To ask the Secretary of State for Health what the (a) mean and (b) median waiting time was for (i) colorectal excision, (ii) radical prostatectomy, (iii) breast excision, (iv) inguinal hernia repair and (v) abdominal aortic aneurysm aorta replacement procedures for patients aged (A) 15 to 39, (B) 40 to 49, (C) 50 to 54, (D) 55 to 59, (E) 60 to 64, (F) 65 to 69, (G) 70 to 74 and (H) over 75 years in each of the last three years for which figures are available. [92579]

Mr Simon Burns: The available information is shown in the following tables which show the mean and median time waited (days) for finished admissions episodes(1) with the main operative procedure(2) as specified by patient age group for 2008-09, 2009-10 and 2010-11.

The information provided includes activity in English NHS hospitals and English NHS commissioned activity in the independent sector.

Information on radical prostatectomy is not available.

Colorectal excision
  2008-09 2009-10 2010-11
Patient age group Mean Median Mean Median Mean Median

15-39

42

32

46

34

44

35

40-49

37

27

38

28

38

30

50-54

32

24

35

27

37

28

55-59

32

23

33

25

35

27

60-64

27

19

28

19

27

19

65-69

27

18

28

18

27

18

70-74

30

20

29

21

30

20

75 and over

27

20

29

21

29

21

Breast excision
  2008-09 2009-10 2010- 11
Patient age group Mean Median Mean Median Mean Median

15-39

42

30

44

30

45

30

1 Feb 2012 : Column 684W

40-49

26

19

28

19

27

19

50-54

23

18

25

18

22

19

55-59

22

18

24

18

22

19

60-64

21

17

22

18

20

18

65-69

21

18

22

18

20

18

70-74

20

18

22

18

21

19

75 and over

21

18

23

19

21

19

Inguinal hernia repair
  2008-09 2009-10 2010- 11
Patient age group Mean Median Mean Median Mean Median

15-39

61

54

61

55

65

57

40-49

64

57

64

56

67

59

50-54

65

57

66

57

68

61

55-59

64

56

64

57

68

62

60-64

64

57

65

57

67

60

65-69

63

56

65

58

67

60

70-74

62

55

65

56

68

61

75 and over

64

55

66

57

69

62

Abdominal aortic aneurysm aorta replacement
  2008-09 2009-10 2010- 11
Patient age group Mean Median Mean Median Mean Median

15-39

27

27

34

34

64

64

40-49

40

40

37

27

32

41

50-54

34

31

30

23

35

21

55-59

36

32

36

28

34

27

60-64

37

29

36

26

35

27

65-69

38

28

38

29

38

33

70-74

38

28

38

31

36

30

75 and over

36

26

38

25

37

27

(1) A finished admission episode (FAE) is the first period of in-patient care under one consultant within one healthcare provider. FAEs are counted against the year in which the admission episode finishes. Admissions do not represent the number of in-patients, as a person may have more than one admission within the year. (2) The first recorded procedure or intervention in each episode, usually the most resource intensive procedure or intervention performed during the episode. It is appropriate to use main procedure when looking at admission details, (eg time waited), but a more complete count of episodes with a particular procedure is obtained by looking at the main and the secondary procedures. Source: Hospital Episode Statistics (HES), Health and Social Care Information Centre.

Radical prostatectomy is not identifiable in Hospital Episode Statistics.

Dr Wollaston: To ask the Secretary of State for Health how many (a) admissions and (b) emergency admissions there were for (i) colorectal excision, (ii) radical prostatectomy, (iii) breast excision, (iv) inguinal hernia repair and (v) abdominal aortic aneurysm aorta replacement procedures for patients aged (A) 15 to 39,

1 Feb 2012 : Column 685W

(B) 40 to 49, (C) 50 to 54, (D) 55 to 59, (E) 60 to 64, (F) 65 to 69, (G) 70 to 74 and (H) over 75 years in each of the last three years for which figures are available. [92580]

Mr Simon Burns: The available information is shown in the tables, which show the total number of finished admissions episodes(1) (FAEs), and FAEs where the method

1 Feb 2012 : Column 686W

of admission is ‘Emergency'

(2)

, where a main operative procedure

(3)

as identified has been carried out, by age group for 2008-09, 2009-10 and 2010-11.

The information provided includes activity in English NHS hospitals and English NHS commissioned activity in the independent sector.

Information on Radical Prostatectomy is not available.

Colorectal Excision
  2008-09 2009-10 2010-11
Patient age group Total FAEs Emergency FAEs Total FAEs Emergency FAEs Total FAEs Emergency FAEs

15 to 39

4,829

752

5,257

777

5,769

748

40 to 49

7,384

647

8,072

722

8,910

675

50 to 54

5,876

452

6,540

454

7,538

473

55 to 59

8,265

565

8,767

577

9,995

657

60 to 64

15,120

879

17,736

855

20,969

873

65 to 69

15,604

888

18,329

912

21,720

924

70 to 74

13,522

1,055

15,104

1,027

18,007

1,059

75 and over

23,238

2,785

25,363

2,854

27,617

2,810

Breast Excision
  2008-09 2009-10 2010-11
Patient age group Total FAEs Emergency FAEs Total FAEs Emergency FAEs Total FAEs Emergency FAEs

15 to 39

9,072

27

9,169

29

8,622

28

40 to 49

10,409

39

10,666

42

11,229

22

50 to 54

6,987

24

6,996

21

7,294

9

55 to 59

6,081

30

5,729

19

5,627

12

60 to 64

7,411

33

7,566

33

7,525

22

65 to 69

6,067

25

6,306

14

6,685

13

70 to 74

3,778

17

3,757

11

4,068

12

75 and over

6,008

44

6,382

30

6,545

17

Inguinal Hernia Repair
  2008-09 2009-10 2010-11
Patient age group Total FAEs Emergency FAEs Total FAEs Emergency FAEs Total FAEs Emergency FAEs

15 to 39

10,985

390

10,081

349

9,960

345

40 to 49

9,279

208

8,994

202

9,053

207

50 to 54

5,241

153

5,109

121

5,115

124

55 to 59

6,952

182

6,408

149

6,288

180

60 to 64

9,114

267

8,745

236

8,823

273

65 to 69

8,035

247

7,814

262

8,037

289

70 to 74

7,897

346

7,626

339

7,384

324

75 and over

14,480

1,259

14,033

1,339

13,715

1,321

Abdominal aortic aneurysm aorta replacement
  2008-09 2009-10 2010-11
Patient age group Total FAEs Emergency FAEs Total FAEs Emergency FAEs Total FAEs Emergency FAEs

15 to 39

4

2

2

0

4

1

40 to 49

6

4

10

2

8

.2

50 to 54

20

6

19

7

25

4

55 to 59

105

43

85

22

77

22

60 to 64

274

85

283

96

265

96

65 to 69

546

167

477

150

401

125

70 to 74

793

257

718

241

606

218

75 and over

1,447

557

1,221

499

1,040

492

1 Feb 2012 : Column 687W

1 Feb 2012 : Column 688W

(1) A finished admission episode (FAE) is the first period of in-patient care under one consultant within one health care provider. FAEs are counted against the year in which the admission episode finishes. Admissions do not represent the number of in-patients, as a person may have more than one admission within the year. (2) An emergency admission is one where the admission method is recorded as one of the following codes: 21 Emergency—via Accident and Emergency (A&E) services, including the casualty department of the provider 22 Emergency—via General Practitioner (GP) 23 Emergency—via Bed Bureau, including the Central Bureau 24 Emergency—via consultant out-patient clinic 28 Emergency—other means, including patients who arrive via the A&E department (3) The first recorded procedure or intervention in each episode, usually the most resource intensive procedure or intervention performed during the episode. It is appropriate to use main procedure when looking at admission details, but a more complete count of episodes with a particular procedure is obtained by looking at the main and the secondary procedures. Source: Hospital Episode Statistics (HES), Health and Social Care Information Centre

Dr Wollaston: To ask the Secretary of State for Health how many (a) admissions and (b) emergency admissions there were for (i) hip replacement, (ii) knee replacement, (iii) coronary artery bypass graft, (iv) cochlea implant and (v) cholecystectomy procedures for patients aged (A) 15 to 39, (B) 40 to 49, (C) 50 to 54, (D) 55 to 59, (E) 60 to 64, (F) 65 to 69, (G) 70 to 74 and (H) over 75 years in each of the last three years for which figures are available. [92581]

Mr Simon Burns: The following tables show the total number of finished admissions episodes(1) (FAEs) and FAEs where the method of admission is ‘Emergency'(2) where a main operative procedure(3) ( )as identified has been carried out, by age group for 2008-09, 2009-10 and 2010-11.

The information provided includes activity in English NHS Hospitals and English NHS commissioned activity in the independent sector.

Hip r eplacement
  2008-09 2009-10 2010-11
Patient age group Total FAEs Emergency FAEs Total FAEs Emergency FAEs Total FAEs Emergency FAEs

15-39

1,199

70

1,205

52

1,283

44

40-49

2,717

209

2,892

221

3,177

194

50-54

3,199

237

3,344

290

3,748

275

55-59

5,631

508

5,509

568

6,058

447

60-64

9,936

1,170

9,840

1,082

10,755

1,097

65-69

12,465

1,708

12,318

1,662

13,022

1,744

70-74

15,666

2,915

15,641

2,965

15,929

2,771

75 and over

43,771

22,337

44,125

22,849

45,890

23,295

Knee replacement
  2008-09 2009-10 2010-11
Patient a ge g roup Total FAEs Emergency FAEs Total FAEs Emergency FAEs Total FAEs Emergency FAEs

15-39

244

1

220

1

181

3

40-49

1,807

9

1,635

12

1,611

5

50-54

3,214

12

2,930

14

3,089

12

55-59

6,502

24

5,713

25

5,918

13

60-64

11,583

31

11,056

27

11,404

41

65-69

13,549

53

12,903

30

13,503

45

70-74

15,243

57

14,473

61

15,099

63

75 and over

24,136

197

23,267

165

24,024

151