20 Feb 2012 : Column 727W

Pupils: Absenteeism

Mr Lammy: To ask the Secretary of State for Education what the (a) overall absence rate, (b) unauthorised absence rate and (c) number of persistent absentees was at each state-funded secondary school in each London borough in each academic year from 2005-06 to the latest figures available. [94133]

Mr Gibb: Information on the overall and unauthorised absence rates and number of persistent absentees in each state-funded secondary school in each London borough for 2005/06, 2007/08 and 2009/10 has been placed in the House Libraries. To provide information for further years would incur disproportionate cost.

School Leaving

Alex Cunningham: To ask the Secretary of State for Education what proportion of school sixth formers left school before completing their post-16 studies in each of the last five years for which figures are available. [94533]

Mr Gibb: The figures requested cannot be readily calculated from the school census data the Department collects from school sixth forms.

Alex Cunningham: To ask the Secretary of State for Education how many additional 17-year-olds will need to participate in education or training by 1 September 2013 to meet the requirements of the Education and Skills Act 2008; and what proportion of such people he expects to be in (a) a school sixth form, (b) a sixth-form college, (c) a further education college and (d) employment with training. [94700]

Tim Loughton: The Education and Skills Act 2008 requires that from September 2013 young people must remain in qualifying education and training until they reach academic age(1) 17. From 2015, the requirement to remain in education and training will be extended further, until the young person reaches their 18th birthday.

How many more young people will need to remain in education and training can be estimated from the number of young people of academic age 16 who were in education and work-based learning at the end of 2010, the latest year for which we have information. This is regarded as the best proxy, from the National Statistics currently available, for provision that will satisfy the RPA requirements.

At the end of 2010, the proportion of young people of academic age 16 in education and work-based learning was 96.1%, or 604,600. Based on figures for 2010, this means an additional 3.9% or 24,600 young people in England would have had to remain in learning. In 2013, the number of additional learners required is likely to be lower than the estimate based on 2010 data. The population of academic age 16-year-olds is projected to be around 616,500 in the year 2013/14. As such, just under 12,000 additional learning places would be required under RPA in 2013 over and above the numbers in education and work-based learning in 2010. The Department for Education is committed to funding places in education and training for all 16 to 17-year-olds.

20 Feb 2012 : Column 728W

Table 1 shows the range of activities or types of educational institution that young people attended at the end of 2010.

(1) Academic age is the age of the young person on the preceding 31 August, it effectively allocates young people into school years, so young people in year 11 will be academic age 15, actual age 15-16.

Table 1: Academic age 16-year-olds in education and work-based learning (1) by route, end 2010 (provisional)
  Percentage Number

Maintained schools

36.0

226,700

Independent schools

6.5

40,900

Sixth-form colleges

12.0

75,200

General FE, tertiary and specialist colleges

37.8

238,100

Higher education institutions

0.4

2,400

Apprenticeships and Entry to Employment (E2E)(2)

3.4

21,200

Total(3)

96.1

604,600

(1) Source: DFE statistical first release “Participation in Education, Training and Employment by 16-18 Year Olds in England” (2) Discounted to allow for young people also participating in full or part-time education. (3) Figures may not add up due to rounding.

Schools: Armed Forces

Bridget Phillipson: To ask the Secretary of State for Education how many children have received the service child premium since May 2010. [94790]

Sarah Teather: The service child premium is paid to schools on the basis of the number of full-time equivalent pupils in state-funded primary, state-funded secondary and maintained special schools recorded on roll as service children on the January 2011 School Census in year groups R-11. It was introduced in April 2011 and 45,070 pupils are eligible in 2011-12. Full details are available on the Department's website at:

http://www.education.gov.uk/schools/adminandfinance/financialmanagement/schoolsrevenuefunding/settlement2012pupilpremium/a0075963/pupil-premium-2011-12

Bridget Phillipson: To ask the Secretary of State for Education how many children were registered as a service child in each academic year since May 2009. [94791]

Sarah Teather: Children are registered as being service children on the January School Census. In January 2010 there were 38,170 pupils registered at nursery, state-funded primary, state-funded secondary and special schools as service children and in January 2011 there were 48,070. This is the total number of pupils registered and will include year groups not eligible for the service child premium.

Bridget Phillipson: To ask the Secretary of State for Education how many children have had the service child premium stopped since May 2010; and for what reasons. [94792]

Sarah Teather: The service child premium is paid to schools on the basis of the number of pupils in the school registered as service children on the January School Census. As long as a child is registered as a service child the premium will continue to be paid. For the first year of the premium the January 2011 Census

20 Feb 2012 : Column 729W

provided the number eligible for the premium from April 2011 to March 2012. As this is the first year of the premium no child has ceased to be eligible since it was introduced. The Department will not hold any information for the reasons a child ceases to be eligible. The service child premium for 2012-13 will be based on the January 2012 School Census, when available.

Schools: Rossendale

Jake Berry: To ask the Secretary of State for Education what plans he has to improve the quality of school buildings in Rossendale and Darwen constituency. [93736]

Mr Gibb: The Department for Education provides capital funding to all local authorities for investment in

20 Feb 2012 : Column 730W

school buildings. It is the responsibility of Lancashire county council to prioritise the available funds across the schools in its estate.

On 13 December 2011, Official Report, columns 92-95WS, we announced capital allocations to schools and local authorities for 2012-13, including £44 million for Lancashire county council. The council and its schools were allocated £69.6 million in 2011-12.

Science: GCSE

Chris Skidmore: To ask the Secretary of State for Education what proportion of pupils were entered for three separate sciences at GCSE in each local authority in 2010-11. [95054]

Mr Gibb: The percentage of pupils that were entered for GCSEs in the three separate sciences in 2010/11 for each local authority is given as follows.

Percentage of Pupils (1,2,3,4) entered for GCSEs in separate sciences by local authority: year 2010/11 (revised), coverage: England
      Three separate sciences
      Percentage entered for GCSEs in:
Region local authority LA region number Number of pupils at end Key Stage 4 Physics Chemistry Biological Sciences

North East

El2000001

29,305

18

18

18

Darlington

E06000005

1,129

19

19

19

Durham

E06000047

5,481

12

12

13

Gateshead

E08000020

2,219

20

20

20

Hartlepool

E06000001

1,285

15

. 15

15

Middlesbrough

E06000002

1,600

16

17

17

Newcastle upon Tyne

E08000021

2,553

17

17

17

North Tyneside

E08000022

2,165

16

16

16

Northumberland

E06000048

3,650

29

29

29

Redcar and Cleveland

E06000003

1,858

24

24

24

South Tyneside

E08000023

1,797

16

16

16

Stockton-on-Tees

E06000004

2,262

17

16

16

Sunderland

E08000024

3,306

16

16

16

           

North West

El2000002

79,661

19

19

19

Blackburn with Darwen

E06000008

1,815

15

16

16

Blackpool

E06000009

1,557

12

12

12

Bolton

E08000001

3,418

19

19

19

Bury

E08000002

2,199

19

19

19

Cheshire East

E06000049

3,839

22

22

22

Cheshire West and Chester

E06000050

3,874

20

20

20

Cumbria

El0000006

5,716

24

24

24

Halton

E06000006

1,462

15

15

15

Knowsley

E08000011

1,578

8

8

8

Lancashire

El0000017

12,878

23

23

23

Liverpool

E08000012

5,136

15

15

15

Manchester

E08000003

4,432

15

15

16

Oldham

E08000004

2,967

16

15

17

Rochdale

E08000005

2,449

10

9

12

Salford

E08000005

2,198

13

13

13

Sefton

E08000014

3,383

15

15

15

St Helens

E08000013

1,977

15

15

15

Stockport

E08000007

3,006

23

23

23

Tameside

E08000008

2,845

14

14

14

Trafford

E08000009

2,829

21

21

21

Warrington

E06000007

2,475

25

25

25

Wigan

E08000010

3,772

20

20

20

Wirral

E08000015

3,856

29

29

29

           

Yorkshire and the Humber

E12000003

59,052

18

19

19

Barnsley

E08000016

2,606

14

14

14

Bradford

E08000032

5,679

13

13

13

20 Feb 2012 : Column 731W

20 Feb 2012 : Column 732W

Calderdale

E08000033

2,590

19

19

19

Doncaster

E08000017

3,536

22

22

22

East Riding of Yorkshire

E06000011

3,952

17

17

17

Kingston upon Hull, City of

E06000010

2,613

6

6

6

Kirklees

E08000034

4,590

23

23

23

Leeds

E08000035

8,001

16

15

17

North East Lincolnshire

E06000012

1,886

10

12

11

North Lincolnshire

E06000013

2,042

17

17

17

North Yorkshire

E10000023

6,792

28

28

28

Rotherham

E08000018

3,491

18

18

18

Sheffield

E08000019

5,514

22

22

22

Wakefield

E08000036

3,985

16

16

16

York

E06000014

1,775

22

22

22

           

East Midlands

El2000004

50,587

19

19

19

Derby

E06000015

2,837

20

20

20

Derbyshire

El0000007

8,760

19

19

19

Leicester

E06000016

3,393

15

15

15

Leicestershire

E10000018

7,460

17

17

17

Lincolnshire

E10000019

8,427

21

21

22

Northamptonshire

E10000021

7,893

22

22

23

Nottingham

E06000018

2,573

16

16

16

Nottinghamshire

E10000024

8,800

17

17

17

Rutland

E06000017

454

27

27

27

           

West Midlands

E12000005

63,387

18

18

18

Birmingham

E08000025

12,159

21

21

21

Coventry

E08000026

3,471

10

10

11

Dudley

E08000027

3,805

15

15

16

Herefordshire

E06000019

1,877

14

14

14

Sandwell

E08000028

3,659

12

13

13

Shropshire

E06000051

3,207

17

17

17

Solihull

E08000029

3,027

20

20

20

Staffordshire

E10000028

9,408

18

18

18

Stoke-on-Trent

E05000021

2,618

11

11

11

Telford and Wrekin

E06000020

2,038

20

21

21

Walsall

E08000030

3,474

18

18

18

Warwickshire

El0000031

6,022

26

26

26

Wolverhampton

E08000031

2,558

15

16

15

Worcestershire

El0000034

6,064

19

19

19

           

East of England

El2000006

64,585

22

22

23

Bedford

E06000055

1,630

19

19

19

Cambridgeshire

El0000003

5,967

28

28

28

Central Bedfordshire

E06000056

2,857

26

26

26

Essex

El0000012

15,887

20

20

20

Hertfordshire

E10000015

12,874

27

27

28

Luton

E06000032

2,408

15

15

15

Norfolk

El0000020

8,887

20

20

20

Peterborough

E06000031

2,276

20

20

20

Southend-on-Sea

E06000033

2,076

27

27

27

Suffolk

E10000029

7,741

21

22

22

Thurrock

E06000034

1,782

19

19

19

           

London

El2000007

74,236

20

20

20

Inner London

E13000001

23,323

18

19

19

Camden

E09000007

1,491

13

13

13

City of London

E09000001

n/a

n/a

n/a

n/a

Hackney

E09000012

1,485

20

20

21

20 Feb 2012 : Column 733W

20 Feb 2012 : Column 734W

Hammersmith and Fulham

E09000013

1,071

32

32

32

Haringey

E09000014

2,107

20

20

20

Islington

E09000019

1,351

11

11

11

Kensington and Chelsea

E09000020

581

14

14

14

Lambeth

E09000022

1,611

22

22

22

Lewisham

E09000023

2,202

23

23

23

Newham

E09000025

3,311

10

10

10

Southwark

E09000028

2,337

17

19

19

Tower Hamlets

E09000030

2,553

21

21

22

Wandsworth

E09000032

1,846

25

25

25

Westminster

E09000033

1,377

18

18

18

           

Outer London

E13000002

50,913

20

20

20

Barking and Dagenham

E09000002

2,060

13

12

15

Barnet

E09000003

3,387

15

15

15

Bexley

E09000004

3,260

23

23

23

Brent

E09000005

2,840

23

23

23

Bromley

E09000006

3,438

21

21

21

Croydon

E09000008

3,719

17

17

17

Ealing

E09000009

2,811

20

20

20

Enfield

E09000010

3,563

18

18

18

Greenwich

E09000011

2,275

17

17

17

Harrow

E09000015

2,141

21

21

21

Havering

E09000016

3,080

15

15

15

Hillingdon

E09000017

2,982

17

17

17

Hounslow

E09000018

2,586

15

16

17

Kingston upon Thames

E09000021

1,524

33

33

33

Merton

E09000024

1,525

22

22

24

Redbridge

E09000026

3,266

25

26

26

Richmond upon Thames

E09000027

1,374

20

20

20

Sutton

E09000029

2,636

44

44

44

Waltham Forest

E09000031

2,456

11

11

11

           

South East

E12000008

88,521

23

23

23

Bracknell Forest

E06000036

1,093

26

26

26

Brighton and Hove

E06000043

2,324

14

14

14

Buckinghamshire

El0000002

5,525

41

41

41

East Sussex

El0000011

5,201

20

20

20

Hampshire

El0000014

13,860

21

21

21

Isle of Wight

E06000046

1,485

19

19

19

Kent

El0000016

16,173

22

23

23

Medway

E06000035

3,231

22

21

22

Milton Keynes

E06000042

2,707

18

18

18

Oxfordshire

El0000025

6,179

24

24

24

Portsmouth

E06000044

1,949

14

14

14

Reading

E06000038

987

29

29

30

Slough

E06000039

1,570

23

23

23

Southampton

E06000045

2,044

23

23

23

Surrey

El0000030

10,725

22

22

22

West Berkshire

E06000037

1,983

20

20

20

West Sussex

El0000032

8,266

21

21

21

Windsor and Maidenhead

E06000040

1,516

36

36

36

Wokingham

E06000041

1,703

27

27

27

           

South West

E12000009

55,540

22

22

22

Bath and North East Somerset

E06000022

2,134

25

25

25

Bournemouth

E06000028

1,703

25

25

25

Bristol, City of

E06000023

3,030

17

17

17

Cornwall

E06000052

5,750

20

20

20

Devon

E10000008

7,503

21

21

21

20 Feb 2012 : Column 735W

20 Feb 2012 : Column 736W

Dorset

El0000009

4,220

24

24

24

Gloucestershire

E10000013

6,624

23

23

24

Isles of Scilly

E06000053

19

26

26

26

North Somerset

E06000024

2,303

21

21

21

Plymouth

E06000026

2,885

14

14

14

Poole

E06000029

1,601

30

30

30

Somerset

El0000027

5,480

21

21

21

South Gloucestershire

E06000025

3,254

20

20

20

Swindon

E06000030

2,196

29

29

29

Torbay

E06000027

1,490

17

17

17

Wiltshire

E06000054

5,148

24

24

24

           

England (maintained sector)

E92000001

564,874

20

20

20

n/a = Not applicable. (1) Figures are based on pupils at the end of Key Stage 4. (2) For each subject, only one attempt is counted—that which achieved the highest grade. This is including attempts by these pupils in previous academic years. (3) Local authority, region and the England (maintained sector) figures in this table do not include pupils recently arrived from overseas. (4) Figures cover achievements in maintained schools including academies but exclude hospital schools, Pupil Referral Units (PRUs) and Alternative Provision (AP). Source: 'GCSE and Equivalent Results in England, 2010/11 (Revised)' available at the following link: http://www.education.gov.uk/rsgateway/DB/SFR/s001056/index.shtml

Sixth Form Education: Assessments

Gareth Johnson: To ask the Secretary of State for Education what proportion of post-16 students studied (a) A levels and (b) the international baccalaureate in (i) Dartford constituency, (ii) Kent and (iii) the UK in each of the last five years. [95077]

Mr Gibb: The information requested for Dartford, Kent and England can be found in the following table for the academic year 2007/08 to 2010/11. Data for 2006/07 can be provided only at disproportionate cost.

Number of students (1) aged 16-18 (2) and percentage entering A levels (3) and the international baccalaureate in Dartford (4) , Kent (5) and England (6) , 2007/08 to 2010/11, maintained schools (including CTCs and academies) and further education sector colleges
    Number of students (1) aged 16-18 (2) Percentage entering A levels (3) Percentage entering the international baccalaureate

2007/08

Dartford

1,138

52.6

12.3

 

Kent

8,412

79.0

2.4

 

England

295,124

76.3

0.4

2008/09

Dartford

1,357

41.8

16.6

 

Kent

9,345

70.2

4.8

 

England

315,361

71.6

0.6

2009/10

Dartford

1,535

40.1

13.4

 

Kent

10,091

65.7

4.8

 

England

342,018

67.8

0.6

2010/11

Dartford

1,580

34.1

14.1

 

Kent

9,963

64.0

4.3

 

England

336,139

67.0

0.7

(1) 16 to 18-year-old students entered for level 3 qualifications at least equivalent in size to one GCE/applied GCE A level. (2) Age at the start of the academic year i.e. 31 August 2010 for 2010/11. (3) Those students entered for GCE/applied GCE A levels and double awards. (4) Parliamentary constituency figures are based on the postcode of the school. (5) Local authority figures are based on the local authority area of the school. (6) England figures are the sum of all local authority figures. Source: 2007/08 to 2009/10: National Pupil Database (final data). 2010/11: Key stage 5 attainment data (revised data).

Special Educational Needs

Peter Aldous: To ask the Secretary of State for Education how many young people with (a) autism and (b) a disability will enter the education system when the participation age is raised in (i) 2013 and (ii) 2015; and what steps he is taking to ensure such demand for places can be met. [94094]

Sarah Teather: All 16 and 17-year-olds who are able to do so will be expected to participate in education or training when the participation age is raised to 17 in 2013 and 18 in 2015. We do not know how many of those young people will have a disability or autism. However, work to assess the financial implications of raising the participation age took into account that more young people from disadvantaged backgrounds will be accessing education, including more who will need extra support to participate.

The Green Paper “Support and Aspiration: A New Approach to Disability”, sets out our aspirations to help young people with special education needs or disabilities make the most of their future, and to give them the best chance of a fulfilling adulthood with employment, good health and independence. Our proposals include access to better quality vocational and work-related learning options to enable young people to progress in their learning post-16, and the development of supported internships. We are considering responses to the consultation on these proposals and will be publishing a report with our progress and next steps shortly.

Young People: Unemployment

Alex Cunningham: To ask the Secretary of State for Education with reference to his statistical release dated 29 November 2011, what proportion of people aged (a) 16, (b) 17 and (c) 18 years old who were not in education, employment or training were not qualified to at least Level one in each of the last five years. [95416]

20 Feb 2012 : Column 737W

Tim Loughton: Quarterly data from the Labour Force Survey on the number and proportion of 16 to 18-year-olds NEET in England are published in the statistical release (SR) ‘NEET Quarterly Brief’. The most recent version was released on 24 November 2011.

The Labour Force Survey does not distinguish between those at Level 1 or below Level 1, but does indicate whether respondents are above or below Level 2, based on the qualifications they report. Sample sizes in the Labour Force Survey are not sufficient to produce robust estimates of qualification levels for young people NEET by single age group, so estimates for 16 to 18-year-olds combined are provided in this response.

The following table shows the proportion of 16 to 18-year-olds who were below Level 2 in Quarter 3 of each year since 2007, for both the NEET group and those in education, employment or training (EET).

Proportion of young people below Level 2 (1)
Percentage
  Q3 2007 Q3 2008 Q3 2009 Q3 2010 Q3 2011

16 to 18-year-olds in EET

28

28

25

23

21

16 to 18-year-olds NEET

56

57

53

50

44

All 16 to 18-year-olds

32

32

28

27

24

(1) Confidence intervals around these estimates at the 95% level are around +/- 5 percentage points for the NEET group, and +1-2 percentage points for the EET group. These confidence intervals are based on sampling error alone. The results will also be subject to respondent error, because the attainment levels in the LFS are assigned based on self-reported qualifications.

Young People: Voluntary Work

Tom Blenkinsop: To ask the Secretary of State for Education how many young people took part in the National Citizen Service pilot in summer 2011; and what the cost to the public purse was of the programme. [95125]

Tim Loughton: This information is being finalised as part of the evaluation of the 2011 pilots. Early indications are that at least 8,300 young people participated in NCS. The allocation of Government funding towards the 2011 pilots was £14,900,000.

The interim NCS evaluation report will be published in March.

Youth Services: Expenditure

Ms Buck: To ask the Secretary of State for Education how much each local authority reported in its Section 251 financial returns as outturn expenditure on (a) youth work, (b) Connexions and (c) all

20 Feb 2012 : Column 738W

provisions for young people per capita in 2010-11; and what proportion of the equivalent figures for 2008-09 this represents. [94627]

Tim Loughton [holding answer 9 February 2012]: The information requested on individual local authorities' spend on youth provision in 2010-11 and comparison with spending in 2008-09 requested has been placed in the House Libraries.

The categories used to record spending on services for young people between 2008-09 and 2010-11 have changed. This means that it is not possible to make reliable year on year comparisons for spending in specific areas. The new method of collection meant that some LAs did not fill in certain fields properly, or at all, and so some figures should be used with extreme caution as it is unlikely they reflect the actual situation and spend within the LA. For example, it is thought to be highly unlikely that an LA would have zero spend on Youth Work across a financial year. Data on spending on student support have not been included in the figures on provisions for young people but have been provided separately in the table.

Alex Cunningham: To ask the Secretary of State for Education what assessment he has made of the capacity of the Connexions Caseload Information System to monitor participation of 16 to 18 year-olds in education or training. [94703]

Tim Loughton: The Client Caseload Information System (CCIS) has been maintained by local authorities since 2003. It is an important tool that they use to gather and record information about the participation of young people in their area in education or training. This enables local authorities to fulfil their statutory duty to support young people to engage in learning.

Each local authority is able to develop their own CCIS system to best meet the needs of young people in their area. These local CCIS databases provide aggregate data automatically to the National CCIS system, which can be used by local authorities to compare their position with neighbouring areas, improving joint working and performance on young people's participation.

Monitoring and supporting young people's participation in education and training will become increasingly important as we raise the participation age to 17 in 2013 and 18 in 2015. As we have made clear in statutory guidance, local authorities will continue to use their CCIS databases to accurately record young people's participation so that they can support those young people who are not participating. Local authorities fund their work to support young people's participation through the Early Intervention Grant.