Public Sector

Mr Thomas: To ask the Chancellor of the Exchequer how many new public sector mutuals were created or spun-off by his Department in (a) 2010-11 and (b) 2011-12; and if he will make a statement. [108918]

Miss Chloe Smith: None.

Revenue and Customs

Cathy Jamieson: To ask the Chancellor of the Exchequer what estimate he has made of the revenue which will accrue to HM Revenue and Customs from the costs incurred by callers to the HM Revenue and Customs helplines. [109358]

Mr Gauke: I would refer the hon. Member to the answer I gave to my hon. Friend the Member for Shipley (Philip Davies) on 6 July 2011, Official Report,column 185W, and to the answer that I gave to her on 17 May 2012, Official Report, column 301W.

Royal Bank of Scotland

Mr Jim Murphy: To ask the Chancellor of the Exchequer whether he has made representations to the Royal Bank of Scotland on reviewing its financial complaints procedures for small and medium-sized enterprises. [109225]

Mr Hoban: The Chancellor of the Exchequer meets senior members of UK banking institutions on a range of issues. It is not the Government's practice to provide details of all such meetings and discussions.

The Government's shareholding in the Royal Bank of Scotland is managed on a commercial and arm's length basis by UK Financial Investments Ltd (UKFI), a company which is wholly owned by the Government. UKFI's role is to manage the investment not to manage the bank—the bank retains its own independent board and management team to manage itself commercially without interference from shareholders.

Tax Allowances: Pensions

Mr Frank Field: To ask the Chancellor of the Exchequer what the cost was of tax relief on employee and employer contributions to personal pension schemes in each of the last 30 years; how many employees in each tax band made contributions to a personal pension in each year; and what the average costs were. [108103]

Mr Hoban: Estimates of the tax cost of personal pensions since 2001-02 can be found in Table PEN6 on the HMRC website at the following link:

http://www.hmrc.gov.uk/stats/pensions/pen6.xls

The available information for prior years was published by HMRC in Inland Revenue Statistics, most recently in Table 7.7, copies of which are available in the House of Commons Library.

24 May 2012 : Column 847W

Published estimates are not available regarding the numbers of employees in each tax band making contributions to a personal pension scheme or of the corresponding average tax costs.

Tax Avoidance

Mr Jim Cunningham: To ask the Chancellor of the Exchequer what steps his Department is taking to minimise tax avoidance. [108878]

Mr Gauke: The Government are committed to tackling tax avoidance and has demonstrated that they will act swiftly to change the law to protect the public finances and maintain fairness in the tax system.

Anti-avoidance measures announced in the 2012 Budget will yield over £1 billion and protect over £10 billion in future revenues over the next five years, including a package of measures to tackle stamp duty land tax (SDLT) avoidance. The Budget also announced a consultation on a general anti-abuse rule in summer 2012 with a view to bringing forward legislation in Finance Bill 2013.

The Government's commitment has been underlined by their reinvestment of £917 million in HMRC, which will enable it to better tackle tax avoidance, evasion and organised crime over the spending review period. This investment will transform HMRC's compliance activities across the board and bring in additional revenues of £7 billion a year by 2014-15 on top of the £13 billion additional revenues to which HMRC is already committed.

VAT

Mr Thomas: To ask the Chancellor of the Exchequer what assessment he has made of the likely cost to the Exchequer of his proposals on VAT levied on private universities; and if he will make a statement. [106750]

Mr Gauke [holding answer 14 May 2012]: No estimate has been made.

Caroline Flint: To ask the Chancellor of the Exchequer what assessment he has made of the effect of his proposals to charge VAT on alterations to listed buildings on the ability of churches and community organisations to install energy efficiency measures. [108805]

Mr Gauke: No specific assessment has been made. After the VAT change on alterations to listed buildings comes into effect, the scope of the Listed Places of Worship Grant scheme will be extended so that it covers alterations as well as repairs, and the funding for this scheme will be increased by £30 million a year. The Government is working with the Church of England, other faith groups and heritage organisations on the design of the scheme.

Mrs Moon: To ask the Chancellor of the Exchequer what representations he has received on the removal of the VAT exemption for the sale of holiday homes; and if he will make a statement. [109024]

Mr Gauke: Since the Budget the Chancellor of the Exchequer has been holding a consultation on a range of VAT anomalies, including static holiday caravans. The consultation concluded on 1.8th May. We will set out our response to the consultation in due course.

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Luciana Berger: To ask the Chancellor of the Exchequer (1) what assessment he has made of the effect of charging VAT on freshly baked goods on pound bakeries in the north of England and their employees; [109207]

(2) when his Department plans to report on its consultation on the effects of charging VAT on freshly baked goods; [109208]

(3) what estimate he has made of the cost to bakeries of changing their tills in order to respond to the proposals in the budget to charge VAT on freshly baked goods. [109209]

Mr Gauke: The impacts are set out in Annex B—Table of Impact for Individual Measures—of the HM Revenue and Customs consultation document ‘VAT: Addressing borderline anomalies’, published in Budget 2012:

http://www.hmrc.gov.uk/budget2012/vat-con-4801.pdf

The consultation closed on 18 May. HM Revenue and Customs is now analysing the responses and a response document will be published before legislation is laid before Parliament in the summer.

VAT: Listed Buildings

Caroline Flint: To ask the Chancellor of the Exchequer (1) if he will provide grants to charities and community organisations based in listed buildings to compensate them for the extra expenditure they will incur under his proposals to charge VAT on alterations to such buildings; [108806]

(2) if he will develop plans to provide support for (a) community organisations and (b) charities based in listed buildings which will be required to pay 20% VAT on alterations to their buildings. [109703]

Mr Gauke: Charities which own listed places of worship will receive such compensation for them. Listed places of worship were already eligible for grants towards the VAT cost of repairs and maintenance through the Listed Places of Worship grant scheme. It is logical to extend this grant scheme to alterations, when the VAT treatment of alterations and repairs is put on the same footing.

Environment, Food and Rural Affairs

Agriculture

Karen Lumley: To ask the Secretary of State for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs what steps her Department is taking to protect and promote the agricultural industry in the West Midlands. [108411]

Richard Benyon: The Rural Development Programme for England (2007-13) is a socio-economic investment programme offering a range of nationally available products to protect and promote the agricultural industry across England, in response to the priorities identified in the Rural Economy Growth Review, including:

Up to £20 million for the Farm and Forestry Improvement Scheme—providing small grants of between £2,500 and £25,000 to enable the development of farm, forestry, and horticulture businesses. To date, DEFRA has received circa 200 applications from businesses in the West Midlands (second highest of any region), approving 175.

24 May 2012 : Column 849W

Up to £60 million for the Rural Economy Grant—providing large grants of over £25,000 up to circa £1 million (no set upper cap) to enable the transformational change in the economic performance of farm, forestry, tourism, and agri-food businesses. In the first application window, DEFRA has received 168 outline applications from businesses in the West Midlands (again the second highest of any region).

Up to £20 million for a Skills and Knowledge Transfer programme—training providers are currently being procured, with the programme due to commence in the autumn 2012. However, through an existing West Midlands land skills training programme 7,000 beneficiaries have attended over 8,000 training days in the last three years.

Up to £20 million Rural Community Broadband Fund (funded jointly by DEFRA and DCMS)—providing grant support to enable communities (including the agricultural industry) to access superfast broadband in hard to reach locations. To date four Expressions of Interest applications received from communities in the West Midlands have been selected to progress to the next application stage.

Huw Irranca-Davies: To ask the Secretary of State for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs what steps her Department is taking to promote the benefits of new farming practices to farmers. [108514]

Mr Paice: DEFRA works with several organisations, including the Agriculture and Horticulture Development Board (AHDB), on projects which help farmers to transfer new farming research into practical solutions. Most DEFRA funded research includes knowledge transfer arrangements to encourage the uptake of findings. This includes demonstration activities, eg through East Malling Research, Stockbridge, Warwick HRI and other horticultural institutes with the aim of improving farm productivity through reduced diseases, and reduced and/or better targeted water and pesticide usage.

The Rural Development Programme England (RDPE) socio-economic investment Programme is in the process of setting up a new Skills and Knowledge Transfer framework which will channel up to £20 million into a flexible and locally targetable skills training programme to be launched in the autumn of 2012. This framework will promote the benefits of new farming practices through targeting the business management skills, knowledge transfer, innovation and technical skills; animal health and welfare; and resource use efficiency. These activities have been developed with industry input and aim to support the needs of the sector moving forward. RDPE funding has also supported over 40 demonstration or “Monitor Farms” across England to demonstrate how effective use of best practice, health planning and research developments can reduce costs and improve performance.

Since 1 January 2012, the new Farming Advice Service (FAS) provides advice on nutrient management and competitiveness, including new farming practices and research outputs. The new service is delivered by AEA Technology plc in active partnership with industry-related bodies, such as AHDB and ADAS, taking advantage wherever possible of existing activities and engagement with farmers.

DEFRA also supports several voluntary approaches to promote the uptake of new practices (eg the Pesticides Voluntary Initiative, Campaign for the Farmed Environment, and industry's Greenhouse Gas Action Plan). DEFRA is currently reviewing the effectiveness

24 May 2012 : Column 850W

of voluntary approaches and the wider provision of advice and incentives to farmers following commitments in the 2011 Natural Environment White Paper.

Animal Feed

Huw Irranca-Davies: To ask the Secretary of State for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs if she will commission research to consider the opportunities and risks arising from using food waste to feed livestock. [108515]

Mr Paice: DEFRA is currently conducting a review on the benefits and risks of using food waste in animal feed (Project FO0218). We anticipate the review concluding at the end of 2012.

Bees

Mr Kennedy: To ask the Secretary of State for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs what consideration her Department has given to the effects of neonicotinoids on bee populations; and what assessment she has made of the effectiveness of current regulations on neonicotinoids in preserving the size of bee populations. [108648]

Richard Benyon: Bee health is influenced by a number of factors, particularly pests and pathogens, environmental impacts, nutrition, the weather and, in the case of honey bees, bee husbandry. All pesticides are subject to a risk assessment, which includes effects on bees, and are not authorised if risks are found to be unacceptable. Government scientists also rigorously assess published research reports on neonicotinoid insecticides with an open mind. We continue to consider the implications of all new published information, including two new studies (Henry et al and Whitehorn et al) published on 29 March, and have sought the views of the independent expert Advisory Committee on Pesticides. We are also carrying out further research of our own. The Government will not hesitate to take action if the available evidence shows the need.

The regulatory system for pesticides is comprehensive and is constantly updated to ensure that it continues to protect people and the environment. For bees, new data requirements will explicitly include studies to address the possible risks to bee behaviour, colony survival and development and to consider possible sub-lethal effects. The independent European Food Safety Authority has just produced a scientific opinion on the EU bee regulatory risk assessment and will produce a new guidance document on the bee risk assessment for member states to follow in authorising pesticide products. UK officials are closely involved in these developments.

Biofuels: Pollution

Graham Stringer: To ask the Secretary of State for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs what plans she has to measure the (a) mortality and (b) morbidity of people living within a radius of (i) 0.5 miles and (ii) one mile of biomass power stations compared with control samples. [108214]

Richard Benyon: Biomass power plants with capacities above 20 MW or regulated under the waste incineration directive are subject to stringent emission controls in

24 May 2012 : Column 851W

their permits. We have also published our intention to include emission limits for particulate matter and oxides of nitrogen as eligibility criteria for the renewable heat incentive for biomass power plants with capacities less than 20 MW.

DEFRA has no plans to measure the mortality or morbidity of people living within a radius of half or one mile of biomass power stations.

Bovine Tuberculosis: Disease Control

Simon Hart: To ask the Secretary of State for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs what clinical trials her Department is supporting to investigate future vaccine resistance in badgers. [108744]

Mr Paice: DEFRA is not supporting any clinical trials to investigate future vaccine resistance in badgers.

Our badger vaccines research programme is now focused on the development of an effective and affordable oral vaccine, which would be more practical to deploy than the current injectable vaccine. This is still at the research stage and is being conducted in collaboration with researchers in the Republic of Ireland and New Zealand. In parallel, research at the Animal Health and Veterinary Laboratories Agency and Fera is ongoing looking at the most suitable bait for the oral vaccine and evaluating strategies for deployment. Compared to an injectable vaccine, an oral vaccine is technically more difficult to formulate and we cannot say with any certainty if and when an oral badger vaccine might be available for use in the field.

Food Supply

Huw Irranca-Davies: To ask the Secretary of State for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs (1) when she expects to publish her proposals for the Government's Green Food Project; [108517]

(2) if she will take steps to ensure the Government's Green Food Project covers all aspects of food sustainability; [108518]

(3) if she will take steps to ensure the Green Food Project takes into account health, environmental, social and economic consequences arising from the way food is produced, sold and disposed of in the UK. [108531]

Mr Paice: The Green Food Project is a joint initiative between the food and farming industry, environmental and consumer organisations and Government.

A steering group of senior representatives from these organisations was set up to oversee and determine the direction of the project's work. Throughout the discussions they have debated a number of food sustainability, social, economic, environmental and health related issues.

The initial findings of the project will be published in July 2012.

Huw Irranca-Davies: To ask the Secretary of State for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs how much her Department spent on research into food production in the last year for which figures are available. [108519]

Mr Paice: DEFRA spent approximately £28 million on food and farming research in 2011-12 and £30 million on animal health and welfare in the agricultural sector.

24 May 2012 : Column 852W

Huw Irranca-Davies: To ask the Secretary of State for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs what role her Department plays in directing where and how research into food production is conducted. [108520]

Mr Paice: DEFRA works with other Government bodies, research councils, industry and the third sector through several initiatives to direct and co-ordinate research into food production. This includes:

The development and implementation of the Government Chief Scientist's UK Food Research and Innovation Strategy.

The Food Research Partnership, which aims to strengthen and co-ordinate multi-disciplinary research on food and farming, directing infrastructure, skills, training and translation of research into practice.

The Global Food Security Research Programme, which promotes collaboration in research funding on food sustainability, security and nutrition in light of a growing global population.

The Technology Strategy Board (TSB) led Sustainable Agri-Food Innovation Platform (SAF IP), which funds industry-led collaborative research between research organisations and industry. DEFRA is also working closely with the TSB on the Detection and Identification of Infectious Agents Innovation Platform to deliver research needs.

At EU and international level, DEFRA is engaged in a number of initiatives to coordinate research on agriculture production such as ERA NETs, to co-fund research, and leverage funding through the Framework 7 programme.(FP7).

Huw Irranca-Davies: To ask the Secretary of State for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs if she will estimate the carbon footprint of the UK food chain. [108525]

Mr Paice: According to the most recently published data, the carbon footprint of the UK food chain is an estimated 183 million tonnes CO2 equivalent in 2009.

Source:

Food Statistics Pocketbook 2011 and DEFRA UK's Carbon Footprint 1990-2009:

http://www.defra.gov.uk/statistics/environment/green-economy/scptb01-ems/

Huw Irranca-Davies: To ask the Secretary of State for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs what steps her Department is taking to promote innovative local food initiatives. [108529]

Mr Paice: The marketing of regional and local food can bring benefits to both producers and consumers alike and we want to encourage innovation in the sector. Recently, DEFRA and the Technology Strategy Board held an innovation summit to increase awareness of the innovation support mechanisms which are available to micro, small and medium-sized food businesses and we launched a competition for SMEs to develop new techniques.

DEFRA support for local food chain initiatives in England has come mainly from the Rural Development Programme for England (RDPE). This funding has supported initiatives including support for local food marketing linked to tourism activity, individual food producers and retail outlets, food hubs and farmers' markets. Support will continue to be available through the new RDPE nationally consistent schemes.

Last September, we published the Social Enterprise Action Research (SEAR) Report on Community Food Enterprises. This report (co-funded by DEFRA and the

24 May 2012 : Column 853W

Cabinet Office) confirmed that across the country there are a range of local food groups of different sizes and membership emerging, often bringing together growers, processors and small food businesses. We welcome the development of these groups and the many benefits they can bring to producers and the local community, particularly to support local growth, but recognise that with the recent changes to the regional tier and closure of Regional Development Agencies, it is for local communities and local economic partnerships to decide where and how initiatives of this nature develop.

Huw Irranca-Davies: To ask the Secretary of State for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs whether (a) she, (b) her Ministers and (c) officials in her Department have had any recent discussions on local food initiatives with counterparts at the Department for Communities and Local Government. [108530]

Mr Paice: Ministers are frequently in discussion with colleagues at the Department for Communities and Local Government (DCLG) regarding a range of issues, including local food initiatives, particularly in the context of the Food Growing in Schools Task Force. In addition DEFRA officials have also had discussions within the last year with their DCLG counterparts on a number of local food related initiatives including the “Communities Orchards: How to Guide” which DEFRA contributed to and on retail markets including those which sell local food.

Food: Prices

Cathy Jamieson: To ask the Secretary of State for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs what estimate she has made of the number of foodbanks which have been established in (a) the UK and (b) Scotland in the last year. [109086]

Mr Paice: The Government has made no estimate of the number of foodbanks in the UK and Scotland.

Food: Production

Huw Irranca-Davies: To ask the Secretary of State for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs whether she has had recent discussions with the Secretary of State for Business, Innovation and Skills on steps to increase university and college-based research into sustainable food production practices. [108512]

Mr Paice: DEFRA is working with other Departments, including Business, Innovation and Skills (BIS), to take forward the recommendations of the Taylor review, which encourages greater collaboration between the public and private sector in funding research, reinvigorating applied research in agricultural science and ensuring more effective knowledge transfer takes place.

Food: Recycling

Huw Irranca-Davies: To ask the Secretary of State for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs whether her Department has undertaken any recent research into the life-cycle impacts of food. [108513]

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Mr Paice: DEFRA has funded life-cycle research to quantify the impacts of agricultural commodities, compare the environmental impacts of different production systems, assess greenhouse gas emissions from post-farm gate stages in the food chain and sustainability impacts of changes towards healthier diets. DEFRA has also funded a review of evidence on the impacts of the food chain, which reviewed the Life-Cycle Assessment (LCA) data available.

Food: Sustainable Development

Huw Irranca-Davies: To ask the Secretary of State for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs what assessment she has made of her Department's capability to undertake research into sustainable food production practices. [108521]

Mr Paice: DEFRA commissions research from its own agencies such as the Food and Environment Research Agency (FERA) and Animal Health and Veterinary Laboratories Agency (AHVLA) and external contractors. Priority evidence needs around sustainable food production practices are identified in dialogue between DEFRA's agencies, evidence specialists and policy teams.

Huw Irranca-Davies: To ask the Secretary of State for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs if she will estimate the amount spent by the private sector on sustainable food production practices in the last year for which figures are available. [108522]

Mr Paice: It is not possible to give a single estimate for money spent by the private sector on “sustainable food production practices”, because levels of sustainability will vary across the food and farming sectors. However we do collect some information about private sector investment, which gives an indication of levels of expenditure.

For example total capital expenditure by UK farmers and food and drink manufacturers is given in the following table.

  Capital expenditure 2010 (£ billion)

Farming(1)

2.2

Food Manufacturers(2)

1.97

Drink manufacturers(2)

0.56

Source s : (1) DEFRA, Agriculture in the UK, excludes livestock. (2) ONS Annual Business Survey

Huw Irranca-Davies: To ask the Secretary of State for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs how much her Department spent on skills training to assist in sustainable food production methods in the last year for which figures are available. [108524]

Mr Paice: The Government works with the industry through forums such as the Agri Skills Forum which brings together organisations with an interest in the development of rural and farming skills. We offer support for skills and training through individual initiatives, for example:

The Rural Development Programme for England provides grant funding for skills and training. In 2011 the programme provided c£14 million of investment in skills and training for the agriculture and forestry sectors of which a significant part will have supported sustainable food production methods skills and training.

24 May 2012 : Column 855W

The Farming Advice Service provides information on nutrient management, competitiveness and climate change adaption and mitigation which give details to improve sustainable food production methods.

The Government provides a grant for the National Federation of Young Farmers' Clubs which is used for training and skills development.

The food and farming industry takes the lead in investing in skills development, working with the network of Sector Skills Councils.

Huw Irranca-Davies: To ask the Secretary of State for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs what recent discussions she has had with (a) the Technology Strategy Board and (b) the Agriculture and Horticulture Development Board on research into sustainable food production practices. [108528]

Mr Paice: DEFRA works closely with the Technology Strategy Board (TSB) as a major funder of the Sustainable Agriculture and Food Innovation Platform to develop research calls. This includes recent calls on innovation in crop protection, sustainable protein, sustainable food production, and food processing and manufacturing efficiency. DEFRA and the TSB also recently held an innovation summit to increase awareness of innovation support mechanisms available to the agri-food industry.

DEFRA liaises regularly with the Agriculture and Horticulture Development Board (AHDB) on research relevant to sustainable food production. Specific activities include discussions at relevant DEFRA and AHDB-sector research steering committees and at individual project level.

Origin Marking

Mr Bradshaw: To ask the Secretary of State for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs what discussions she has had with her EU counterparts on extending the UK's labelling guidelines across the EU as a whole. [108725]

Mr Paice: Most labelling guidelines published by DEFRA (covering such topics as “sell-by” and “display-until” dates) are purely intended for use within the United Kingdom, since discussions within the EU on these matters take place within the framework of the Food Information Regulation. The only exception is the United Kingdom's voluntary labelling guidance for fresh produce, food and drink originating from the Occupied Palestinian Territories. Discussions have taken place about that guidance within the context of the Mashreq/Maghreb European Council Working Group, during which the initiative taken by the United Kingdom provoked widespread interest. The European External Action Service has called on all EU member states, as well as the European Commission, to take appropriate steps in relation to labelling advice, and we have made it clear that the United Kingdom would be ready to provide, on request, further information about our own scheme.

Plants: Disease Control

Zac Goldsmith: To ask the Secretary of State for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs whether she has any plans to bring forward proposals to amend Schedule 9 to the Wildlife and Countryside Act 1981 to ban the sale of certain invasive non-native plant species. [109189]

24 May 2012 : Column 856W

Richard Benyon: Proposals to prohibit the sale of five highly invasive plant species are currently being reviewed through the Government's rigorous regulatory approvals process. These species are already listed in schedule 9 to the Wildlife and Countryside Act 1981, which is a pre-condition for the use of powers to prohibit sale. An announcement will be made in due course.

Rural Areas: Northumberland

Guy Opperman: To ask the Secretary of State for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs what steps she is taking to encourage growth and competitiveness in rural farms and businesses in Northumberland. [108143]

Richard Benyon: DEFRA works across Government ensuring measures designed to support economic growth are having proportionate and positive impacts in rural areas.

On 29 November 2011, the Government announced a strong package of new measures, designed to stimulate sustainable growth in the rural economy and help businesses reach their full potential. The results of this include the establishment of five Rural Growth Networks in 2012-13 (including one in Durham and Northumberland), and the targeting of £100 million of Rural Development Programme for England funding at meeting rural economy growth review priorities.

Broadband connectivity is also vital for economic prosperity and the Government has invested £530 million to support the roll out of broadband across all rural areas. Through the £20 million Rural Community Broadband Fund, the Government is also providing grant support to enable communities (including businesses) to access superfast broadband in hard to reach locations.

£150 million is also being invested in the UK to improve mobile phone coverage.

Water Abstraction

Nicholas Soames: To ask the Secretary of State for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs when she plans to bring forward proposals for a new programme for the abstraction of water regime. [109266]

Richard Benyon: Reforming the water abstraction regime is a complex process, which will involve changing around 30,000 licences. We are working closely with abstractors and other stakeholders to develop detailed proposals for reform. We plan to consult on these proposals in late 2013, and then legislate for change early in the next Parliament. Implementation of reform in a phased way would begin soon after that, though it may take until the late 2020s to complete.

Health

Blood: Donors

Andy Burnham: To ask the Secretary of State for Health (1) how much his Department spent on advertising to encourage people to donate blood in (a) 2010-11 and (b) 2011-12; [109203]

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(2) how much has been allocated to the NHS Blood and Transplant's Team Give Blood campaign. [109204]

Anne Milton: In 2010-11, NHS Blood and Transplant (NHSBT), an arm's-length body of the Department, spent £2.4 million on advertising to encourage people to donate blood; in 2011-12, NHSBT spent £2.3 million on advertising.

During 2012, NHSBT needs to increase blood stocks by 30% in preparation for the additional bank holiday and the Olympic games period, as donors are less likely to donate during this time. The Team Give Blood campaign forms part of NHSBT's wider campaign this year to encourage existing donors to donate regularly, and to attract new donors. By the end of the Paralympics, NHSBT expects to have spent £1.56 million on advertising but to still keep within its annual general advertising budget of £2.4 million for 2012-13 through effective management of this higher level of blood stocks.

Andy Burnham: To ask the Secretary of State for Health how many people donated blood in England in (a) 2010-11 and (b) 2011-12. [109205]

Anne Milton: In 2010-11, 1.07 million people donated blood at least once at a session held by NHS Blood and Transplant in England; in 2011-12, it was 1.05 million people. In each year, just under 2 million donations were collected.

Care Homes

Mr Jim Cunningham: To ask the Secretary of State for Health what assessment his Department has made of the effect of changes to local government budgets on the cost of placing each patient into care provided by an independent care provider. [109365]

Paul Burstow: Commissioning of adult social care services is devolved to local authorities, and it is for each local authority to negotiate and agree the fees paid to individual providers, reflecting local circumstances. In setting these fee levels, local authorities should have due regard to the actual costs of providing care.

The Department does not set or recommend rates at which local authorities contract with providers of care, and has therefore made no assessment of the cost of placing individual care users with independent providers.

In the most recent spending review, the Government recognised the pressures on the adult social care system within a challenging settlement for local government, and took the decision to prioritise adult social care by allocating an additional £7.2 billion to the system over the four years to 2014-15 to support local authorities in delivering social care. When combined with a rigorous local authority focus on efficiency, this additional £7.2 billion means that there is funding available to protect people's access to care and deliver new approaches to improve quality and outcomes.

Complaints

Mr Thomas: To ask the Secretary of State for Health how many complaints about the work of his Department and each of its agencies and non-departmental public bodies were received in (a) 2010-11 and (b) 2011-12; and if he will make a statement. [108947]

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Mr Simon Burns: The following table shows how many complaints about the work of the Department and each of its agencies and non-departmental public bodies were received in 2010-11 and 2011-12.

These figures are for financial years (April-March):

Department, agency or arm's length body How many complaints were received in 2010-11? How many complaints were received in 2011-12?

Department of Health

31

21

Alcohol Education and Research Council

0

0

Appointments Commission

17

19

Care Quality Commission(1):

   

—Stage 1

207

548

—Stage 2

51

47

Council for Healthcare Regulatory Excellence

6

5

General Social Care Council

143

116

Health Protection Agency

22

20

Human Fertilisation and Embryology Authority

1

1

Human Tissue Authority

1

1

Medicines and Healthcare products Regulatory Agency(2)

4

5

Monitor

4

1

(1) Complaints about the Care Quality Commission are handled in two stages. Stage one is a local resolution stage managed within each individual directorate. If the complainant remains unhappy, they can request a more formal stage two review. This stage is managed by a central national complaints team. The number of stage one complaints was not captured centrally until April 2010. (2) Denotes executive agency.

Dementia

Chris Skidmore: To ask the Secretary of State for Health how many patients received treatment from the NHS for dementia in each year since 1997. [108875]

Paul Burstow: Data on out-patient activity for dementia are not routinely collected. However, in September 2011, the NHS Information Centre published the results of an audit of memory services for dementia which showed that 951 people per primary care trust on average accessed memory services in 2010-11, compared to 605 in 2008-09.

Information on in-patient admissions for dementia is shown in the following table:

Count of finished admission episodes (1) (FAEs) with a primary diagnosis (2 ) of dementia by year from 1997-98 to 2010-11
  FAEs

1997-98

29,925

1998-99

29,998

1999-2000

27,940

2000-01

25,178

2001-02

25,021

2002-03

25,210

2003-04

24,101

2004-05

22,741

2005-06

21,218

2006-07

19,513.

2007-08

18,088

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2008-09

17,536

2009-10

17,614

2010-11

17,275

Notes: 1. Finished admission episodes A finished admission episode (FAE) is the first period of in-patient care under one consultant within one health care provider. FAEs are counted against the year in which the admission episode finishes. Admissions do not represent the number of in-patients, as a person may have more than one admission within the year. 2. Primary diagnosis The primary diagnosis is the first of up to 20 (14 from 2002-03 to 2006-07 and seven prior to 2002-03) diagnosis fields in the Hospital Episode Statistics (HES) data set and provides the main reason why the patient was admitted to hospital. 3. Data quality HES are compiled from data sent by more than 300 NHS trusts and primary care trusts in England and from some independent sector organisations for activity commissioned by the English NHS. The NHS Information Centre for health and social care liaises closely with these organisations to encourage submission of complete and valid data and seeks to minimise inaccuracies. While this brings about improvement over time, some shortcomings remain. 4. Assessing growth through time HES figures are available from 1989-90 onwards. Changes to the figures over time need to be interpreted in the context of improvements in data quality and coverage (particularly in earlier years), improvements in coverage of independent sector activity (particularly from 2006-07) and changes in NHS practice. For example, apparent reductions in activity may be due to a number of procedures which may now be undertaken in out-patient settings and so are no longer included in admitted patient HES data. Source: Hospital Episode Statistics (HES), Health and Social Care Information Centre

Drugs: Misuse

Tom Blenkinsop: To ask the Secretary of State for Health what estimate he has made of the cost to the NHS of the illegal use of controlled substances in (a) England, (b) the North East and (c) Teesside in the latest period for which figures are available. [109130]

Anne Milton: The cost of meeting the health needs in England and Wales arising from the use of Class A drugs was £488 million in 2003-04, as estimated in “Measuring different aspects of problem drug use: methodological developments, Home Office Online Report 16/06”. Separate figures for England, or regions within England, are not available.

Additionally, Drug Treatment Outcomes Research Study, published in December 2009, assessed the outcomes, costs and benefits of drug treatment in England and estimated that in the absence of treatment the average annual cost to health and social care services would be £4,543 per person, and that structured treatment reduces this cost by 31% (£3,120).

Jim Dobbin: To ask the Secretary of State for Health with reference to the answer of 26 March 2012, Official Report, column 987W, on drugs: misuse, what progress has been made against each action point of the round table meeting on addiction to medicines; when the action points of 15 March and the draft consensus statement will be circulated more widely; when the round table will be reconvened; and whether the All Party Parliamentary Group on Involuntary Tranquilliser Addiction will be included as a stakeholder at that reconvened meeting. [109260]

24 May 2012 : Column 860W

Anne Milton: Departmental officials are currently incorporating the latest drafting comments from attendees at the round table meeting, and we plan to circulate the documents containing agreed decisions shortly. We have no plans to invite hon. Members to meetings of the round table which is designed to bring together healthcare professionals and service users. I have therefore met the hon. Member on a number of occasions so that he can contribute his views on this issue.

Genito-urinary Medicine

Ms Abbott: To ask the Secretary of State for Health (1) what guidance Public Health England plans to issue to support local authorities in commissioning open access sexual health services; [109245]

(2) what steps he has taken to ensure that open access sexual health services will be (a) commissioned and (b) paid for by local authorities. [109246]

Anne Milton: Secondary legislation will require local authorities to commission confidential, open-access testing and treatment for sexually transmitted infections, and confidential open-access contraception services.

The sexual health policy document currently in development will signpost to existing guidance including clinical guidelines and standards developed by professional bodies and organisations such as the National Institute for Health and Clinical Excellence. Local authorities will be able to use this guidance to help them to commission high quality sexual health services. Public Health England will also work with local authorities to determine what other support they may find useful.

Local authorities will use the ring-fenced public health grant they will receive to pay for the sexual health services they will commission.

Health Services

Tom Blenkinsop: To ask the Secretary of State for Health (1) what steps he plans to take to encourage the engagement of (a) speech and language therapists and (b) other allied health professionals with clinical senates and networks; [109142]

(2) what estimate he has made of the number of clinical (a) senates and (b) networks likely to be established in England in the next 12 months. [109143]

Anne Milton: To date, over 800 stakeholders have contributed to work being taken forward by the NHS Commissioning Board Authority (NHS CBA) on the development of clinical senates and clinical networks. These include patients, clinicians, commissioners, providers, Royal Colleges and academics.

Allied health professionals, including speech and language therapists, play a vital role in the health service and will make an important contribution to clinical senates and networks in the new health system. The Department's Chief Health Professions Officer meets regularly with leaders from the relevant professional bodies and has ensured they are kept up to date with the development of proposals for clinical senates and networks. In addition, the NHS CBA's Clinical Transitions Director has met with the National Allied Health Professional Advisory Board, which advises on matters relating to education, training and other workforce issues, to discuss clinical

24 May 2012 : Column 861W

senates and networks. The Department is also working with the professional bodies and strategic health authority allied health professionals leads to develop a database of clinical experts from each profession working in the major clinical/disease areas to help inform the future membership of clinical senates and networks.

There are likely to be 14-16 clinical senates established in the new health system, reflecting major patient flows through the system. They will cover the whole of England and will help clinical commissioning groups, health and wellbeing boards and the NHS Commissioning Board to make the best decisions about health care for the populations they represent by providing strategic advice and leadership.

The NHS CBA will publish its recommendations for clinical networks in the new health system shortly.

Hepatitis

Mr Buckland: To ask the Secretary of State for Health if he will take steps to ensure that NHS funding of new Hepatitis C treatments is established within 90 days of any NICE technology appraisal which recommends such funding. [108874]

Mr Simon Burns: Primary care trusts are legally obliged to fund drugs and treatments recommended in National Institute for Health and Clinical Excellence technology appraisal guidance, within three months of guidance being published, unless the requirement is waived in a specific case.

Herbal Medicine

Mike Weatherley: To ask the Secretary of State for Health (1) whether the introduction of the traditional herbal medicinal products directive changes the status of any herbal or botanical product previously or currently on the market as a botanical food supplement under the terms of the food supplements directive; and if he will make a statement; [108144]

(2) what research into food use for botanical ingredients the Medicines and Healthcare products Regulatory Agency undertakes prior to determining whether such a use exists; whether such research has recently been undertaken by the agency into the use of milk thistle; and what consideration it gave to the use of milk thistle in fruit smoothies, Vietnamese chicken soup, cereals and porridge in any such research; [108145]

(3) for what reasons the Medicines and Healthcare products Regulatory Agency is requiring the removal from the market place of botanical food supplements which have no record of harm; [108146]

(4) what assessment he has made of the extent to which the approach to the interpretation of the provisions of the traditional herbal medicinal products directive of the Medicines and Healthcare products Regulatory Agency contributes to the Government's deregulation objectives; [108147]

(5) what (a) meetings and (b) correspondence (i) Ministers and (ii) officials in (A) his Department and (B) the Medicines and Healthcare products Regulatory Agency have had with Insight Public Affairs; and if he will place in the Library a copy of each meeting report and item of correspondence. [108148]

24 May 2012 : Column 862W

Mr Simon Burns: The classification of products as medicines is made on a case-by-case basis by the Medicines and Healthcare products Regulatory Agency (MHRA) under the Medicines for Human Use (Marketing Authorisations Etc.) Regulations 1994 as amended. The definition of the term “medicinal product” was not changed by the introduction of the traditional herbal medicinal products directive (THMPD).

The MHRA will take all relevant information into account when assessing the status of a product. The MHRA has not carried out any research into the use of milk thistle in fruit smoothies, Vietnamese chicken soup, cereals and porridge. The MHRA seeks voluntary compliance with medicines legislation wherever possible and companies can ask for a review of any provisional determination that a product is a medicine.

The MHRA is committed to effective, proportionate implementation of the European directive on traditional herbal medicines which can best ensure its benefits for consumers and for companies compliant with the legislation.

A search of the Department's ministerial correspondence database has identified 10 items of correspondence received since 1 May 2010 from Insight Public Affairs. This figure relates to correspondence addressed to departmental Ministers and received by the Department's central correspondence unit only. It does not include correspondence addressed directly to officials as this information is not collated centrally. The MHRA has not had any meetings with Insight Public Affairs on the THMPD but has received four Freedom of Information requests from them. Officials intend to place copies of the correspondence in the Library at a later date subject to written consent being received from concerned parties, who have been contacted in line with the requirements of the Data Protection Act and the Freedom of Information Act 2000.

Hospitals: Greater London

Mr Thomas: To ask the Secretary of State for Health how many operations were cancelled by (a) North West London Hospitals Trust, (b) Hillingdon Hospital, (c) St Mary's Hospital Paddington and (d) Chelsea and Westminster Hospital on or after the day of admission in (i) 2010-11 and (ii) 2011-12; how many out-patient appointments were cancelled by each hospital in each year; and if he will make a statement. [109395]

Mr Simon Burns: This information is not held in the format requested. Information is available at trust level.

Number of cancelled operations for non clinical reasons
  Cancelled Operations
Hospital Provider 2010-11 2011-12

North West London Hospitals NHS Trust

447

477

The Hillingdon Hospitals NHS Foundation Trust

161

148

Imperial College Healthcare NHS Trust

642

672

Chelsea and Westminster Hospital NHS Foundation Trust

91

88

Note: A last minute cancellation is one that occurs on the day the patient was due to arrive, after they have arrived in hospital or on the day of their operation. Source: Department of Health, Knowledge and Intelligence

24 May 2012 : Column 863W

Number of outpatient hospital appointments and cancellations 2010-11 and April to January 2011-12 (provisional data)
  All Appointments Hospital cancellations
Hospital Provider 2010-11 2011-12 2010-11 2011-12

North West London Hospitals NHS Trust

446,986

360,155

0

0

The Hillingdon Hospitals NHS Foundation Trust

336,169

279,539

0

0

Imperial College Healthcare NHS Trust

1,230,773

1,043,301

131,371

110,961

Chelsea and Westminster Hospital NHS Foundation Trust

543,829

518,497

0

0

Notes: 1. Appointments and cancellations These are counts of appointments and not patients as the same patient may have more than one appointment in a year. It should be noted that cancellation information is not collected on a mandatory basis and therefore zero values may indicate that a provider does not collect this information. 2. Hospital provider Hospital providers can also include treatment centres. Normally, if data are tabulated by health care provider, the figure for an NHS trust gives the activity of all the sites as one aggregated figure. 3. Outpatient Data Quality Outpatient Hospital Episode Statistics data were collected for the first time in 2003-04 and data quality, particularly for clinical information, remains poor. It is not mandatory to code procedures on outpatient records and only around 2% of records have completed clinical codes. We have no reliable existing data source to validate these data against, as Department of Health aggregate returns have never collected clinical codes; it is not clear how representative the figures are. The data represent a sample of outpatient attendances. Statistical estimates (such as median and 90th percentile waiting times for main operations) must be regarded as potentially unreliable until it is possible to assess the quality of local coding. Source: Hospital Episode Statistics, Health and Social Care Information Centre

Lost Property

Mr Thomas: To ask the Secretary of State for Health how many items of equipment valued at £10,000 or more his Department lost in (a) 2010-11 and (b) 2011-12; and if he will make a statement. [108929]

Mr Simon Burns: The Department has not lost any single items of equipment valued at £10,000 or more in either 2010-11 or 2011-12.

Medical Treatments

Chris Ruane: To ask the Secretary of State for Health pursuant to the answer of 16 May 2012, Official Report, column 154W, on pain: mental illness, if he will commission further research into the efficacy of mindfulness-based therapies in the treatment of chronic pain and associated depression. [108865]

Paul Burstow: The Department has no plans to specifically commission research into the efficacy of mindfulness-based therapies in the treatment of chronic pain and associated depression. However, the Department's National Institute for Health Research welcomes funding applications for research into any aspect of human health, including mindfulness-based therapies. These applications are subject to peer review and judged in open competition, with awards being made on the basis of the scientific quality of the proposals made.

Medical Treatments Abroad

Chris Skidmore: To ask the Secretary of State for Health how many NHS patients have sought treatment abroad that was paid for by the NHS since 2005. [108876]

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Anne Milton: United Kingdom citizens can access treatment abroad funded by the national health service in four ways:

by obtaining an E112, replaced by the S2 in May 2010, which allows one European economic area (EEA) country to send a patient to another EEA country for elective treatment;

using the provisions of article 56 of the European treaty to access treatment in another European country and be retrospectively reimbursed by a primary care trust;

by making an individual funding request to their primary care trust which enables a patient to receive treatment in any country, including those outside the EEA; and

using the European Health Insurance Card to access emergency treatment while on a temporary visit to another EEA member state.

Of these categories, the Department only holds figures for the number of E112s and S2s issued to NHS entitled patients in another EEA country, as shown in the following table:

  Total number of E112s/S2s issued

2005

363

2006

419

2007

552

2008

1,153

2009

1,377

2010

1,212

2011

1,208

2012 to 18 May

523

Full total

6,807

Mental Illness: Drugs

Caroline Lucas: To ask the Secretary of State for Health what steps he has put in place to ensure coordination of commissioning of services for people with multiple diagnoses who require treatment for mental ill-health commissioned by GP consortia and drug treatment services commissioned by a local authority; and if he will make a statement. [108852]

Paul Burstow: Clinical commissioning groups will work with elected councillors, local authority commissioners and representatives of patients and the public through health and wellbeing boards to develop a comprehensive analysis of health and social care needs in each local area through Joint Strategic Needs Assessments (JSNAs), and to translate these into action through Joint Health and Wellbeing Strategies and their own commissioning plans. Health and wellbeing boards will promote joined up commissioning that will support integrated provision of services across the local health and social care system. This should mean that people who need both mental health and drug treatment services experience services that are better joined up and better meet their needs as individuals.

The implementation framework for ‘No health without mental health' will set out what local organisations can do, both individually and in partnership, to better meet the needs of people with mental health problems, including people with complex needs and dual diagnosis.

Caroline Lucas: To ask the Secretary of State for Health what recent estimate he has made of the number of people in the Brighton and Hove area who suffer from multiple diagnoses of mental ill-health and drug dependency; and if he will make a statement. [108853]

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Anne Milton: Mental health problems are common among drug misusers. One research study(1) found that up to 70% of the drug treatment population have common mental health problems such as anxiety disorders.

(1) Weaver T, Stimson G, Tyrer P, Barnes T and Renton A (2004) What are the implications for clinical management and service development of prevalent comorbidity in UK mental health and substance misuse treatment populations? Drugs: Education, Prevention and Policy 11, 329-348

Although there has been no specific estimate of the number of people in the Brighton and Hove area with a dual diagnosis of mental ill-health and drug dependency, the National Drug Treatment Monitoring System (NDTMS) records that out of a total of 1,513 adults in Brighton and Hove who received structured drug treatment during 2010-11, there were 133 in who were recorded as receiving care from mental health services for reasons other than substance misuse.

It is important to note that:

this is not a population estimate;

that the mental health care tends to be treatment for more serious mental health problems, and may not include people suffering from all types of depression, and anxiety; and

because the NDTMS collects information on people receiving structured drug treatment, its data do not include those who are not attending any mental health or drug treatment service, those who are drug dependent but are receiving their mental health care in a general practitioner setting and those who are attending mental health services but do not want or need structured drug treatment.

National Childbirth Trust: Training

Steve Brine: To ask the Secretary of State for Health what steps he is taking to encourage students to train to become National Childbirth Trust practitioners. [109193]

Anne Milton: This scheme is an initiative of the National Childbirth Trust (NCT). We understand the NCT are working with the University of Worcester to provide accredited training for those wanting to support parents in transition to parenthood.

The Department with a range of partners has developed a set of resources, based on the most recent evidence, called ‘Preparing for Birth and Beyond’, to be used by those delivering antenatal education to community groups. We understand that the NCT are using these resources in their work with parents-to-be and new mothers and fathers.

NHS: Pay

Chris Skidmore: To ask the Secretary of State for Health how many NHS staff earn salaries in excess of (a) £30,000, (b) £50,000, (c) £100,000 and (d) £150,000. [108877]

Mr Simon Burns: Information is not held centrally on the salaries of national health service staff.

Patients

Huw Irranca-Davies: To ask the Secretary of State for Health whether his Department has considered the merits of introducing a Patients Service Obligation. [109058]

24 May 2012 : Column 866W

Mr Simon Burns: There are existing legal duties on manufacturers and distributors of medicines to ensure appropriate and continued supplies to pharmacies within the limits of their responsibilities, so that the needs of patients are met. The Medicines and Healthcare products Regulatory Agency is currently reviewing the public service obligations introduced by other European member states. The Government is cautious about increasing the regulatory burden on the supply chain.

Plastic Surgery: Death

Ms Abbott: To ask the Secretary of State for Health how many people died as a result of cosmetic surgery in each of the last five years. [109243]

Mr Hurd: I have been asked to reply on behalf of the Cabinet Office.

The information requested falls within the responsibility of the UK Statistics Authority. I have asked the authority to reply.

Letter from Stephen Penneck:

As Director General for the Office for National Statistics, I have been asked to reply to your recent question asking how many people have died as a result of cosmetic surgery in each of the last five years. (109243)

It is not possible to provide an estimate of how many people have died as a result of cosmetic surgery from routine death registration data. Cause of death information provided at death registration is obtained from the Medical Certificate of Cause of Death and classified according to the International Classification of Diseases (ICD). The ICD identifies causes related to “misadventures to patients during medical and surgical care” and “surgical operations and medical procedures that cause abnormal reactions” but does not provide the level of detail required to identify procedures related to cosmetic surgery.

The number of deaths registered in England and Wales each year by sex, age, cause, marital status and place of death are published annually and are available here:

www.ons.gov.uk/ons/publications/all-releases.html? definition=tcm%3A77-27475

Postnatal Depression

Andy Burnham: To ask the Secretary of State for Health what steps he is taking to improve the quality of data on the number of women diagnosed with postnatal depression. [109206]

Anne Milton: We do not hold data on the number of women suffering from postnatal depression centrally.

Postnatal depression encompasses a range of diagnoses from anxiety and depression to the more severe puerperal psychosis, with symptoms occurring a few weeks or months after birth. Postnatal depression may be diagnosed by different health professionals such as midwives, health visitors or general practitioners seeing women in different settings and using different information systems.

The issue of improving links between maternity and mental health information collections to enable better analysis has been considered by the NHS Health and Social Care Information Centre. Recommendations for improvement will be developed during 2012-13.

24 May 2012 : Column 867W

Prescription Drugs

Keith Vaz: To ask the Secretary of State for Health what representations he has received from NHS trusts and hospitals on prescription drugs shortages since January 2012. [109034]

Mr Simon Burns: The Department received a total of 27 representations from national health service trusts in England (including hospitals) on medicines supply issues in the period 1 January 2012 to 18 May 2012. These form part of the routine work that the Department undertakes on mitigating and resolving shortages related to manufacturing issues. These figures are approximate, representing minimum figures received by the Department.

Huw Irranca-Davies: To ask the Secretary of State for Health (1) when he last met representatives of (a) patients groups, (b) pharmaceutical companies, (c) community pharmacy representatives, (d) dispensing doctors and (e) GPs to discuss shortages of medicines at pharmacies; [109054]

(2) whether he has met patients who have been affected by shortages of medicines at local pharmacies; [109055]

(3) when he last discussed shortages of medicines at local pharmacies with the Pharmaceutical Services Negotiating Committee; [109056]

(4) whether he has discussed shortages of medicines at local pharmacies with Ministers in the devolved administrations; [109059]

(5) what recent discussions (a) he and (b) officials in his Department have had with their EU counterparts on the export of medicines from the UK. [109060]

Mr Simon Burns: Ministers regularly meet with interested parties and discuss medicines supply issues when they are raised. Officials regularly meet with interested parties to explicitly discuss medicines supply issues.

Huw Irranca-Davies: To ask the Secretary of State for Health how many hours his Department has spent assessing shortages of medicines at local pharmacies since May 2010. [109057]

Mr Simon Burns: Departmental officials routinely assess shortages of medicines as part of their day to day work in managing and mitigating medicines supply issues.

Public Sector

Mr Thomas: To ask the Secretary of State for Health how many new public sector mutuals were created or spun-off by his Department in (a) 2010-11 and (b) 2011-12; and if he will make a statement. [108913]

Mr Simon Burns: Of the 40 Right to Request spin-outs that are currently operating as social enterprises to deliver and expand their services in new and innovative ways, 16 went live in 2010-11 and 24 went live in 2011-12.

24 May 2012 : Column 868W

Rape: Drugs

Helen Jones: To ask the Secretary of State for Health what steps the NHS has taken to ensure hospitals have early evidence kits to allow them to administer tests for the presence of date-rape drugs; and if he will make a statement. [109285]

Anne Milton: The collection of evidence that can be used in criminal proceedings is the responsibility of the police. Early evidence kits are designed for the collection of samples to capture evidence following an allegation of sexual assault and, as such, are standard issue for police and forensic physicians, rather than accident and emergency (A&E) departments. Where someone has been assaulted and presents to an A&E department, they may be referred or taken to a Sexual Assault Referral Centre (SARC), many of which are located in hospitals. All SARCs are able to carry out a detailed forensic medical examination and to provide holistic treatment for the victim in the immediate aftermath of sexual assault. Alternatively, a forensic physician provided by the police can attend the A&E department to take initial samples. Guidance has been issued by the Faculty of Forensic and Legal Medicine on the provision of samples for forensic use, and on testing for drugs.

Testing for the presence of drugs requires a urine sample which any A&E department can collect if necessary and would not require the use of an early evidence kit. Hair can also be sampled up to one month later, depending on the drug used.

Church Commissioners

Churches: West Midlands

Karen Lumley: To ask the hon. Member for Banbury, representing the Church Commissioners, how many churches were closed in (a) Redditch and (b) the west midlands in 2009-10, 2010-11 and 2011-12. [108412]

Tony Baldry: No Church of England churches in Redditch have closed under the Pastoral Measure 1983 from 2009 to date, although the Commissioners recently concluded that a draft scheme providing for the closure for regular public worship of Redditch St George should be allowed to proceed.

In terms of the west midlands—for these purposes the dioceses of Hereford, Worcester, Lichfield, Birmingham and Coventry—schemes have been made to close four churches in this period, although one is yet to be brought into effect.

The four schemes made for closures of churches in the west midlands were for Welsh Bicknor St Margaret and Brampton Abbotts St Michael and All Angels (both in Hereford); Rugby St Matthew (Coventry) and Droitwich Spa St Mary (Worcester). The latter scheme, involving a cemetery chapel not used for over 30 years, has not yet been brought into effect.

Metal Theft

Michael Dugher: To ask the hon. Member for Banbury, representing the Church Commissioners, what the cost was of metal theft from Church of England property in

24 May 2012 : Column 869W

(a)

Barnsley East constituency,

(b)

Barnsley metropolitan borough and

(c)

South Yorkshire in (i) 2010 and (ii) 2011. [107908]

Tony Baldry: The insurance cover available from Ecclesiastical Insurance who insure the majority of churches in England has changed over the years in question, so a true year-on-year comparison of cost is difficult to make.

(a) Figures are also not available specifically for the Barnsley East constituency.

(b) The figures for the Barnsley metropolitan borough are as follows:

  Claims Value of claims (£)

2010

7

7,000

2011

8

22,000

(c) In the wider area of South Yorkshire the figures are as follows:

  Claims Value of claims (£)

2010

127

257,000

2011

135

237,000

Business, Innovation and Skills

Recession

14. Mr McKenzie: To ask the Secretary of State for Business, Innovation and Skills what steps his Department is taking in response to the economy entering recession; and if he will make a statement. [109162]

Mr Willetts: The Department for Business, Innovation and Skills is driving forward the structural reforms that will help deliver the Government's economic ambitions. There is still much to do.

The figures show inflation is down, exports are up, public borrowing is forecast, by the OBR, to fall this year and employment is up.

Cities

18. Robert Halfon: To ask the Secretary of State for Business, Innovation and Skills what steps he is taking to promote economic growth in cities; and if he will make a statement. [109167]

Greg Clark: The Government is devolving power to cities through the city deal process, giving new freedoms to cities to take bold and innovative approaches towards promoting economic growth at the local level. The Government has already announced radical deals devolving powers to Manchester and Liverpool. We are finalising negotiations with the remaining core cities, and deals are due to be announced in the next few weeks.

Catapult Centres

19. Adam Afriyie: To ask the Secretary of State for Business, Innovation and Skills what progress he has made on the roll-out of catapult centres. [109168]

24 May 2012 : Column 870W

Mr Willetts: The Technology Strategy Board has announced the seven Catapult centres that are to be established. The High Value Manufacturing Catapult opened for business in October 2011 and the other six centres in the areas of Cell Therapy, Offshore Renewable Energy, Satellite Applications, Connected Digital Economy, Transport and Future Cities are being developed and will all become operational during 2012-13.

Adult Education: Dyslexia

Gareth Johnson: To ask the Secretary of State for Business, Innovation and Skills what steps his Department is taking to provide support for dyslexic students in adult education. [109532]

Mr Hayes: The Government funds basic English and maths courses for adults from entry level up to and including level 2. Each learner is expected to be given a diagnostic assessment of their learning needs which will inform a personalised learning plan. This will include identifying any specific learning difficulties including dyslexia and providing the necessary support.

Further education providers also receive additional learning support funding which can be used to meet the costs of providing additional support to learners with learning difficulties.

Apprentices

Duncan Hames: To ask the Secretary of State for Business, Innovation and Skills what proportion of apprenticeships terminated within 12 months in each of the last two years; and of those, how many apprentices left their placement for permanent employment. [109220]

Mr Hayes: Apprenticeships are of varying durations and we have taken ‘termination' in this case to mean leaving the apprenticeship early due to redundancy.

The Learner Satisfaction Survey (2009) asked about reasons for leaving early. Fewer than 5% said they left due to redundancy.

Accurate information on the reasons for non-completion is not currently available in administrative data (the Individualised Learner Record).

Note that apprenticeships are not ‘placements' but jobs and the majority of these are permanent contracts. The Learner Satisfaction Survey shows that 17% of those who left the apprenticeship early said they did so to change jobs.

In terms of what monitoring is in place for completed apprentices the Department (with NAS) undertakes surveys which ask about their employment outcomes after completion. The most recent (published May 2012) shows 89% in employment and 3% in education or training.

We are also able to track apprentices through our matched datasets to look at wage and employment outcomes. This dataset is still quite new but has the potential to greatly enhance our knowledge of such outcomes.

24 May 2012 : Column 871W

Apprentices: South West

Anne Marie Morris: To ask the Secretary of State for Business, Innovation and Skills how many businesses in (a) Newton Abbot constituency, (b) the South West and (c) England employed at least one apprentice in the latest period for which figures are available. [107009]

Mr Hayes: Information is not available on the number of businesses employing apprentices at the constituency level. In the South West there were 21,350 workplaces with at least one apprentice in-learning in the 2010/11 academic year. The total figure for England was 177,310 workplaces. The number of employers is recorded at the site (workplace) level, which means some large organisations can be counted more than once.

Information on the number of apprenticeship starts is published in a quarterly statistical first release (SFR). The latest SFR was published on 29 March 2012:

http://www.thedataservice.org.uk/statistics/statisticalfirstrelease/sfr_current

Further breakdowns are available in SFR supplementary tables:

http://www.thedataservice.org.uk/statistics/statisticalfirstrelease/sfr_supplementary_tables/

Business

Mr Iain Wright: To ask the Secretary of State for Business, Innovation and Skills what assessment he has made of the report by the All-Party Parliamentary Small Business Group on Breaking Down the Barriers to Entrepreneurship; and whether he plans to implement the recommendations of the report relating to his Department. [108335]

Mr Prisk: I would like to thank the All-Party Parliamentary Small Business Group for their report that we have only recently received. We will look carefully at their recommendations.

Business: Billing

Mr Hanson: To ask the Secretary of State for Business, Innovation and Skills what steps his Department is taking to promote best payment practices with small and medium-sized enterprise representative bodies; and if he will make a statement. [109198]

Mr Prisk: This Department supports and promotes the Institute of Credit Management's Managing Cashflow guides, which contain helpful advice on payment terms and invoicing for small businesses and have attracted over 300,000 downloads. I have also convened a prompt payment working group, which is exploring measures to help small and medium sized businesses invoice customers promptly and accurately, promote good practice among the small business community and encourage better relationships between small businesses and their large customers. This working group will meet again in the summer. We are at present taking forward a body of work both with this group and the members of the Small Business Economic Forum; actions and proposals arising from this work will be published in due course.

24 May 2012 : Column 872W

Business: Government Assistance

Brandon Lewis: To ask the Secretary of State for Business, Innovation and Skills what steps his Department is taking (1) to assist small and medium-sized enterprises to grow; [109316]

(2) to encourage the creation of new small and medium-sized enterprises. [109318]

Mr Prisk: We want to make the UK the best place in the world to start and grow a business, and for the next decade to be the most entrepreneurial and dynamic in Britain's history. That is why, in January, my right hon. Friend the Prime Minister launched “Business in You”, a major year-long campaign, to inspire people to realise their business ambitions and to highlight the range of support available for start-ups and growing businesses.

We recognise that these are challenging times for new and existing businesses and we have introduced a range of measures to encourage people to set up their own business and support to help businesses survive and grow.

Encouraging an entrepreneurial mindset

We are supporting a number of measures aimed at inspiring young people to think about setting up their own business, including:

Supporting every school to develop and run its own business through “the Enterprise Village”

www.enterprisevillage.org.uk

Supporting the Premier League in developing a Premier League Enterprise Academy model, enabling football clubs to foster enterprise among young people and principally in deprived areas.

Supporting the Inspiring the Future initiative

www.inspiringthefuture.org

which aims to get 100,000 people to volunteer to go into schools to talk about their jobs and careers.

Supporting Speakers for Schools

http://www.speakers4schools.org/

which aims to have 1,000 speakers who can address the topical issues of the day.

Supporting the development of Tenner (a programme providing school children with £10 to fund a business idea and to grow their money).

Supporting the creation of student-led enterprise societies and ensuring their support is accessible to all students in further education and higher education by 2015.

Ensuring individuals and small and medium-sized enterprises (SMEs) can access the support and advice they need to start and grow their business

We have transformed the way that we enable people to access the information, guidance and advice they need to start and grow a business. We have put in place a range of services including;

An improved www.businesslink.gov.uk website including My New Business, a comprehensive start-up service, and a new Growth and Improvement Service.

A Business Link helpline which will support those who are unable to access the internet.

A mentoring portal www.mentorsme.co.uk providing an easy route to find experienced business mentors.

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Ensuring businesses can access the finance they need

Ensuring the flow of credit to viable SMEs is essential for supporting growth and is a core priority for this Government. The Government has:

Introduced a new National Loan Guarantee Scheme: up to £20 billion of guarantees for bank funding will be available over two years allowing banks to offer lower cost lending to SMEs.

Increased the funds available to invest through the Business Finance Partnership (BFP) to £1.2 billion. Government has invited the first round of proposals to help businesses access non-bank finance through the BFP, and will allocate £100 million of the BFP to invest through non-traditional lending channels.

Announced the continuation of the Enterprise Finance Guarantee (EFG) scheme until 2014/15, providing, subject to demand, over £2 billion in total over the next four years.

Announced continuation of the Government's Enterprise Capital Funds programme, increasing our commitment by £200 million over the next four years, providing for more than £300 million of venture capital investment to address the equity gap for early stage innovative SMEs.

Announced a new £10 million Startup Loans scheme to provide start-up finance for 18 to 24-year-olds looking to start their own business due to be launched later this month.

Encouraged Business Angel investment through a new £50 million Business Angel Co-Investment Fund.

Welcomed the report of the industry review of non-bank lending chaired by Tim Breedon and will take forward its recommendations over the course of this year, including: considering how to simplify access to Government support for smaller businesses; encouraging prompt payment by larger firms; and supporting industry work to remove barriers to alternative sources of finance.

Introduced a Regional Growth Fund, a £2.4 billion fund operating across England from 2011 to 2015. It supports projects and programmes that lever private sector investment creating economic growth and sustainable employment.

Ensuring that regulation supports business growth

Introduced a ‘one-in, one-out' rule whereby no new regulations which impose costs on businesses can be brought in without regulation of an equivalent value being removed.

Introduced a three-year moratorium on new domestic regulation affecting micro businesses and genuine start-ups.

Introduced the Red Tape Challenge to tackle the stock of regulation via a comprehensive thematic review which aims to identify regulations that could be removed, simplified or done in a different way. By the end of December 2011 we had scrapped or simplified over 600 regulations.

Reformed the way in which regulations are implemented, including a review of regulators to ensure enforcement arrangements are appropriate and proportionate. Government will also launch sector-based reviews of regulation to ensure it is enforced at the lowest possible cost to business.

Announced significant deregulation of employment law in order to reduce barriers to businesses taking on new staff.

Encouraging exporting SMEs

Export markets are vital for growth. We have taken a number of measures to support exporting, including:

Government will spend £35 million to double, from 25,000 to 50,000, the number of SMEs that UK Trade and Investment (UKTI) supports a year by 2015. Many components of the UKTI product are aimed at SMEs:

Passport to Export is a trade development programme offering new and inexperienced exporters help and support to build the capability to start exporting proactively and make their first visit to an export market. Launched in 2001, it has helped around 14,000 SMEs as of January 2012.

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Gateway to Global Growth offers experienced SME exporters the opportunity to increase their exporting skills and awareness of what is on offer from UKTI and private sector suppliers. The aim is to help them enter more difficult markets or expand in existing ones.

Market Visit Support provides assistance to new to export and/or new to market SMEs visiting overseas markets, individually or in groups as part of their trade development process.

Budget 2012 set out an ambition to more than double annual UK exports to £1 trillion by 2020 through additional measures including expanding the overseas role of UK Export Finance to enable it to develop finance packages that could help UK exporters secure opportunities identified through UKTI's High Value Opportunities programme; helping secure temporary private sector office space overseas for new UK exporters in high growth countries where such services are difficult to obtain; and continuing to increase UK Export Finance's regional presence in the UK to support SMEs seeking trade finance.

Measures to encourage entrepreneurship in specific groups:

Introduced 24 Enterprise Zones across England to generate businesses and jobs, helping to rebalance the economy. Benefits to business include a simplified planning regime, a business rate discount worth up to £275,000 over a five year period, priorities and Government support to ensure that super-fast broadband is rolled out throughout the zones.

Be the Boss—a £5 million fund to allow the Royal British Legion to help ex- service personnel to set up and grow businesses by reducing the costs and barriers associated with self-employment and start-ups, including mentoring support.

Working with social landlords to remove red tape and encourage more tenants to start up businesses.

Business: Regulation

Mr Evennett: To ask the Secretary of State for Business, Innovation and Skills what steps he has taken to reduce the burden of regulation on (a) small and medium-sized and (b) other businesses. [109169]

Mr Prisk: The Government has a comprehensive approach to cutting the burden of red tape. We have:

capped the cost of new regulation;

identified hundreds of existing regulations to be scrapped; and

introduced a moratorium from regulation for all micro businesses.

Brandon Lewis: To ask the Secretary of State for Business, Innovation and Skills what steps his Department is taking to reduce the administrative burden on small and medium-sized enterprises; and whether his Department plans to take any further steps to reduce such burdens. [109317]

Mr Prisk: This Government has taken specific and concrete steps to reduce the administrative burden on small and medium sized enterprises:

We have already saved small and medium-sized enterprises £388 million by not extending the right to request time to train to businesses with fewer than 250 employees;

The display ban on tobacco, which applies to supermarkets and very large stores from April 2012, will not apply to smaller tobacco retailers until April 2015;

We are phasing implementation of pensions auto enrolment, so that small business will not need to comply until June 2015;

We have achieved agreement in Brussels exempting up to 1.4 million UK small businesses from certain EU accounting rules.

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More widely, the Government introduced a three year moratorium on new domestic regulation for micro-businesses and start-ups from 1 April 2011 in order to support growth and establish a period of increased regulatory stability for the smallest businesses.

To help reduce the burden of new business regulation we have introduced the One-in, One-out rule, so that if a Department wants to introduce a new rule which generates costs for business, they must first identify a corresponding cut in regulation elsewhere with the same value.

We are running the Red Tape Challenge, a process for scrapping and simplifying existing regulations that are obsolete.

Finally, we recently launched Focus on Enforcement, to improve the impact on business of how regulations are enforced.

We will continue to use the One-in, One-out rule to stem the tide of burdens flowing from domestic regulation, and different themes continue to come in to the spotlight under the Red Tape Challenge, along with ongoing review of regulators as part of Focus on Enforcement.

Carbon Emissions

Luciana Berger: To ask the Secretary of State for Business, Innovation and Skills what his Department's total level of carbon emissions was between (a) 1 April 2010 and 1 April 2011 and (b) 2 April 2011 and 1 April 2012. [108575]

Norman Lamb: The information requested is as follows:

(a) BIS's carbon emissions from its office estate for financial year 2010/11 were 6,534.59 tonnes.

(b) BIS's carbon emissions from its office estate for financial year 2011/12 were 3,991.5 tonnes. This represents a 38.92% reduction in emissions compared to 2010/11. This significant reduction can be attributed in large part (2,446.53 tonnes) to the vacation of Kingsgate House in March 2011.

Luciana Berger: To ask the Secretary of State for Business, Innovation and Skills what measures his Department introduced to reduce its carbon emissions in (a) 2010, (b) 2011 and (c) 2012. [108576]

Norman Lamb: The Greening Government Commitments which were announced in 2010 have set the target to reduce carbon emissions by 25% by 2014/15 from a 2009/10 baseline. To meet this target and to reduce BIS's resource consumption and related operational costs a number of measures have been introduced.

(a) In May 2010 David Cameron announced the 10% carbon reduction campaign, to be achieved within a year. BIS participated in this by carrying out a variety of measures:

Expediting site rationalisation process.

Installed voltage reduction equipment.

Aligned operating temperatures with best practice for the public sector and adjusted set points on heating and cooling.

Implementing an “optimal core hours window” for heating and cooling.

Revising server room cooling temperatures.

Eliminating unnecessary or redundant internal and external lighting.

Installed timers on lifts and shut off six lifts at the weekend and evenings.

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Turning computers and monitors off properly during prolonged absences.

An internal communications campaign run jointly by Estates and Internal Communications teams, which ran poster campaigns, intranet stories, off and online suggestion boxes and foyer displays.

(b) In March 2011 BIS vacated Kingsgate House a year before the lease expiry and all non-essential plant was switched off with the building mothballed as far as possible.

The measures which were introduced in 2010 were maintained and replicated. This included the partial shutdown of 1 Victoria street during the Christmas period with heating only provided to the ‘spur’ of the building.

(c) In 2012, BIS are continuing to monitor energy consumption and limit plant running times to reduce consumption.

Projects that are taking place which have an energy reduction component to them include replacing cooling plant in two buildings with more efficient chillers and a lift refurbishment project. A toilet refurbishment project is currently out to tender and the specification has stipulated low voltage lighting and hand dryers.

Careers Advice: Postgraduate Education

Shabana Mahmood: To ask the Secretary of State for Business, Innovation and Skills what steps he is taking to ensure that tailored careers advice is available to (a) undergraduate students considering postgraduate study, (b) people in work considering postgraduate study and (c) people undertaking postgraduate study. [109127]

Mr Hayes: High quality information, and independent, professional advice and guidance for those who need it most, are a vital part of an efficient labour market which drives growth. The National Careers Service provides such information and advice so that people can make learning and career choices which are well informed and reflect their own circumstances. Universities also have their own university careers services which are particularly well placed to offer careers advice to individuals considering postgraduate courses of study.

Conditions of Employment

Mr Jim Cunningham: To ask the Secretary of State for Business, Innovation and Skills whether representatives from (a) trades unions and (b) employers were consulted in the development of the Beecroft Report. [109364]

Norman Lamb: This is a matter for Mr Adrian Beecroft and not for the Government. The report was produced independently by Mr Beecroft whom we expect would have spoken to a range of interested parties in preparing the report. The analysis and recommendations in the report are his own and do not represent the views of the Government.

Construction: Billing

Mr Hanson: To ask the Secretary of State for Business, Innovation and Skills what arrangements are in place for sub-contractors to report incomplete payments made by contractors in the construction sector; how complaints are arbitrated; and if he will make a statement. [109196]

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Mr Prisk: The Government has taken a number of measures to improve cash flow in the construction industry. These include:

improving the Construction Act to increase access to adjudication (a quick 28 day dispute resolution process), improving communication of what is to be paid and remove unnecessary bureaucracy and red tape.

making it a contractual requirement that payment reaches the third tier of the supply chain within 30 days on Government construction projects.

increasing the use of project bank accounts.

More generally BIS supports the Institute of Credit Management's Prompt Payment Code and Cash Flow Management Guides. The public sector seeks to set an example in this with a commitment that central Departments pay 80% of invoices within five days. People working on public sector contracts can report cases of non-payment to the Efficiency Reform Group in the Cabinet Office.

Mr Hanson: To ask the Secretary of State for Business, Innovation and Skills which representatives of the construction sector he has met to discuss payment practices in the last six months; and if he will make a statement. [109197]

Mr Prisk: I regularly meet many organisations, including those in the construction sector, to discuss a wide range of issues.

EU Internal Trade

Mr Buckland: To ask the Secretary of State for Business, Innovation and Skills with reference to the recommendations of the British Chamber of Commerce's report, Exporting is Good for Britain but Market Barriers Stifle Opportunities, if he will press for the full implementation of the European Single Market. [108851]

Norman Lamb: Yes. The UK has been at the forefront of calls for the full implementation of the various EU directives which enhance the single market. The EU Commission are due to launch a further range of measures to achieve this aim and we have been engaging with them and other member states to ensure that the proposals actually address the problems, particularly in the areas of services and improving the governance of the single market to ensure member states live up to their commitments.

Exports: Copyright

Mike Weatherley: To ask the Secretary of State for Business, Innovation and Skills what assessment he has made of the (a) size and (b) importance of copyright licensing to the UK's exports. [107907]

Norman Lamb: The Department for Business, Innovation and Skills has not made its own assessment of the size and importance of copyright licensing to the UK's exports.

The United Nations Conference on Trade and Development (UNCTAD) Creative Economy Report 2010 shows that in 2008 the UK exported nearly $20 billion in creative goods:

24 May 2012 : Column 878W

http://archive.unctad.org/templates/webflyer.asp?docid =14229&intitemID=5763&lang=1&mode=downloads

This figure informed the Hargreaves Review of Intellectual Property and Growth.

Estimates of export licence income, including copyright, are included in ONS surveys of International Trade in Services, which is summarised in United Kingdom Balance of Payments—The Pink Book at:

http://www.ons.gov.uk/ons/rel/bop/united-kingdom-balance-of-payments/2011/tsd-pink-book-2011-time-series.html

The intellectual Property Office is working with ONS to improve estimates of copyright investment and income in UK national accounts.

Exports: North West

Andrew Stephenson: To ask the Secretary of State for Business, Innovation and Skills what the value was of exports to (a) European economic area (EEA) and (b) non-EEA countries from (i) the North West and (ii) Pendle in 2011. [109295]

Mr Prisk: HMRC publish regional trade in goods data on the UKTradeinfo website.

(i) In 2011 exports of goods from the North West region to (a) EEA countries was £13.6 million, while exports to (b) non-EEA countries was £12.5 million.

It is not possible to calculate a value for Pendle as data are only published at a regional level.

Food: Prices

Mrs McGuire: To ask the Secretary of State for Business, Innovation and Skills with reference to the Answer of 23 April 2012, Official Report, column 738W, on labelling: food, what assessment he has made of the ability of customers to compare the price of food items which are priced differently when provided for sale loose and packaged; and what steps he plans to take to provide clearer pricing information. [108747]

Norman Lamb: The Department has made no assessment of the ability of customers to compare the price of food items which are priced differently when provided for sale loose and/or packaged.

The Price Marking Order 2004 requires the selling price and, where appropriate, the unit price of products to be clearly displayed. The unit price is required for products sold loose from bulk and also for goods pre-packed in a constant quantity. Pre-packaged products are required by weights and measures legislation to be marked by weight or volume. The Department has no plans at this stage to require clearer pricing information.

Any evidence of breach of this legislation should be brought to the attention of the relevant local authority trading standards service.