NHS: Telephone Numbering

Andrew Stephenson: To ask the Secretary of State for Health how many NHS bodies have changed their telephone number since directions on the use of 084 numbers were issued in December 2009. [109960]

Mr Simon Burns: The Department has made no assessment of number of national health service bodies that have changed their telephone number since December 2009.

The Department issued guidance and Directions to NHS bodies in December 2009 on the cost of telephone calls, which prohibit the use of telephone numbers that charge the patient more than the equivalent cost of calling a geographical number to contact the NHS. It is currently the responsibility of primary care trusts to ensure that local practices are compliant with the Directions and guidance.

Northumbria Healthcare NHS Foundation Trust

Tony Cunningham: To ask the Secretary of State for Health for what reasons the acquisition of North Cumbria University Hospital Trust by Northumbria Healthcare NHS Foundation has been delayed; and if he will take steps to ensure the acquisition proceeds quickly. [109903]

Mr Simon Burns: We understand that this acquisition is progressing in line with the timetable agreed by the national health service organisations concerned. NHS North of England, North Cumbria University Hospitals NHS Trust and Northumbria Healthcare NHS Foundation Trust (FT) are working together to ensure the process is successful and happens as soon as possible to ensure the delivery of sustainable, high quality healthcare services to the people of North Cumbria. Sustainability is key to the delivery of the commitment for all remaining NHS trusts to achieve FT status as stand-alone organisations or in some other organisational form, including, acquisition by an existing FT.

11 Jun 2012 : Column 149W

Nurses: Schools

Mrs Hodgson: To ask the Secretary of State for Health (1) how many and what proportion of (a) secondary schools and (b) associated primary school clusters are served by a full-time school nurse in (i) Washington and Sunderland West constituency and (ii) England; [109510]

(2) how much funding his Department provided for school nurses in each primary care trust area in each year since 2010; [109511]

(3) whether his Department plans to allocate one qualified school nurse to each secondary school and its cluster of primary schools; and when he expects this objective to be achieved. [109533]

Anne Milton: The information requested is not collected centrally. It is for local commissioning organisations to make funding decisions based on national and local priorities for improving health and to commission services accordingly. This process provides the means for assessing local needs including the health needs of children and young people and thus the funding and commissioning of appropriate services including school nursing services.

To support this process the Department has worked in partnership with school nurses, professional bodies and young people as part of the School Nursing Development Programme. We have developed a new vision and model for the profession covering many elements of health and wellbeing for children and young people aged five to 19. The report and call to action from this programme, “Getting it right for children, young people and families” was published in March 2012. A copy of the report has already been placed in the Library and is available at:

www.dh.gov.uk/prod_consum_dh/groups/dh_digitalassets/@dh/@en/documents/digitalasset/dh_133352.pdf

Mrs Hodgson: To ask the Secretary of State for Health how many qualified school nurses there were in (a) Washington and Sunderland West constituency and (b) England in each of the last three years. [109522]

Anne Milton: Washington and Sunderland West constituency falls within the area covered by Sunderland Teaching Primary Care Trust (PCT). The number of qualified school nurses employed by the national health service in Sunderland Teaching PCT and England in the annual NHS workforce census for each of the last three years is shown in the table.

The table from the annual NHS workforce census shows that there was one qualified school nurse employed by the NHS in Sunderland Teaching PCT in 2009 and that no qualified school nurses were employed by the NHS in Sunderland Teaching PCT in 2010 and 2011. However, school nurses are often employed outside the NHS and if they are employed in the NHS they tend to have a lead employer for a wider patch.

11 Jun 2012 : Column 150W

NHS hospital and community health services: qualified school nursing nurses in England, the North East strategic health authority area and each specified organisation as at 30 September each specified year
Full time equivalent
 200920102011

England Qualified School Nurses

1,167

1,096

1,165

Of which:

   

North East Strategic Health Authority area Qualified School Nurses

51

50

58

Of which:

   

County Durham and Darlington NHS Foundation Trust Qualified School Nurses

0

0

49

Darlington PCT Qualified School Nurses

44

45

0

Gateshead PCT Qualified School Nurses

3

2

5

North Tees and Hartlepool NHS Foundation trust Qualified School Nurses

3

3

3

North Tyneside PCT Qualified School Nurses

0

0

3

Northumberland Care Trust Qualified School Nurses

1

0

0

Redcar and Cleveland PCT Qualified School Nurses

0

0

1

South Tyneside PCT All School Nursing nurses

14

0

0

Sunderland Teaching PCT Qualified School Nurses

1

0

0

Notes: 1.School nurses are often employed outside the NHS and if they are employed in the NHS they tend to have a lead employer for a given area. 2. As part of the changes that are currently effecting the organisational structure of the NHS the legally defined PCTs have clustered into larger regional units to provide a more consistent approach to care in their local health economy and to benefit from the savings such as shared management teams that this offers. In the case of the PCTs in the North East of England these changes have been present for some time and this can be seen in the increases and decreases in staff numbers (for example qualified nurses) across the PCTs as provision has been centred on one of the local PCTs within the cluster. 3. A few NHS organisations existed within the Electronic Staff Record database with small numbers of staff as a result of the impact of Transforming Community Services and the resultant system mergers and demergers which were still ongoing at the time of the 2011 census. Source: Health and Social Care Information Centre Non-Medical Workforce Census

Obesity: Surgery

Ms Abbott: To ask the Secretary of State for Health how many people in each (a) socio-economic, (b) ethnic and (c) age group underwent weight-loss operations in each of the last 10 years. [109604]

Anne Milton: The NHS Information Centre has provided a count of finished consultant episodes (FCEs) with a primary diagnosis of obesity and a main or secondary operative procedure of bariatric surgery, for each socio-economic, ethnic, and age group for the years 2001-02 to 2010-11.

This information is provided in the following tables:

Count of finished consultant episodes (FCEs)(1) with a primary diagnosis of obesity(2) and a main or secondary operative procedure of bariatric surgery(3) for each (a) socio-economic(4), (b) ethnic(5), and (c) age group for the years 2001-02 to 2010-11(6)
Activity in English NHS Hospitals and English NHS commissioned activity in the independent sector
(a) Socio-economic group
 2001-022002-032003-042004-052005-062006-072007-082008-092009-102010-11

Least deprived 10%

4

6

10

16

26

99

122

208

335

405

11 Jun 2012 : Column 151W

11 Jun 2012 : Column 152W

Less deprived 10-20%

7

12

10

18

40

103

151

267

483

491

Less deprived 20-30%

8

7

26

23

51

137

176

280

486

591

Less deprived 30-40%

12

26

21

30

52

141

181

340

542

653

Less deprived 40-50%

14

17

31

25

52

152

233

329

689

722

More deprived 40-50%

15

20

25

42

49

177

248

396

657

816

More deprived 30-40%

23

15

38

42

88

188

276

449

794

943

More deprived 20-30%

16

31

36

49

85

207

330

552

1,046

1,159

More deprived 10-20%

19

23

50

63

87

270

424

619

1,123

1,232

Most deprived 10%

26

42

53

68

102

295

432

649

1,068

1,094

Unknown

7

7

10

12

2

11

25

54

113

135

Activity in English NHS Hospitals and English NHS commissioned activity in the independent sector
(b) Ethnic group
  2001-02(7)2002-03(7)2003-042004-052005-062006-072007-082008-092009-102010-11

A

British (White)

61

93

168

197

341

974

1,511

2,755

5,275

5,979

B

Irish (White)

1

4

6

5

10

41

43

42

C

Any other White background

6

5

13

15

42

68

108

263

275

D

White and Black Caribbean (Mixed)

2

6

10

12

19

32

E

White and Black African (Mixed)

1

1

7

7

9

10

F

White and Asian (Mixed)

2

4

4

10

9

G

Any other Mixed background

 

1

1

4

9

10

19

23

33

H

Indian (Asian or Asian British)

2

3

4

9

13

27

71

68

J

Pakistani (Asian or Asian British)

2

1

5

9

25

34

44

K

Bangladeshi (Asian or Asian British)

1

1

3

3

12

12

L

Any other Asian background

1

3

4

4

9

14

35

40

M

Caribbean (Black or Black British)

1

2

4

2

11

22

44

62

139

155

N

African (Black or Black British)

1

2

2

11

20

40

91

98

P

Any other Black background

2

6

7

17

18

43

130

131

R

Chinese (other ethnic group)

2

S

Any other ethnic group

1

2

4

4

17

39

50

67

99

X

Not known

6

14

21

40

244

317

175

119

249

Z

Not stated

20

83

112

127

194

411

506

758

994

965

0

White

32

9

1

Black - Caribbean

1

9

Not given

37

2

Activity in English NHS Hospitals and English NHS commissioned activity in the independent sector
(c) Age group

Age group

2001-02

2002-03

2003-04

2004-05

2005-06

2006-07

2007-08

2008-09

2009-10

2010-11

10-19

1

3

2

10

24

29

34

37

20-29

12

19

26

27

46

152

247

360

593

625

30-39

52

63

98

135

188

491

703

1,055

1,761

1,806

40-49

51

75

119

144

250

674

931

1,505

2,730

3,070

50-59

30

40

62

71

124

383

575

956

1,716

2,070

60-69

5

9

4

8

24

70

112

228

477

608

70-79

 

3

8

23

19

80-120

1

Unknown

1

2

2

2

6

11 Jun 2012 : Column 153W

11 Jun 2012 : Column 154W

(1) Finished Consultant Episode (FGE) A finished consultant episode (FCE) is a continuous period of admitted patient care under one consultant within one health care provider. FCEs are counted against the year in which they end. Figures do not represent the number of different patients, as a person may have more than one episode of care within the same stay in hospital or in different stays in the same year. (2) Primary diagnosis The primary diagnosis is the first of up to 20 (14 from 2002-03 to 2006-07 and seven prior to 2002-03) diagnosis fields in the Hospital Episode Statistics (HES) data set and provides the main reason why the patient was admitted to hospital. ICD-10 code used: E66—Obesity (3) Number of episodes with a (named) main or secondary procedure The number of episodes where the procedure (or intervention) was recorded in any of the 24 (12 from 2002-03 to 2006-07 and four prior to 2002-03) procedure fields in a HES record. A record is only included once in each count, even if the procedure is recorded in more than one procedure field of the record. Note that more procedures are carried out than episodes with a main or secondary procedure. For example, patients under going a ‘cataract operation’ would tend to have at least two procedures—removal of the faulty lens and the fitting of a new one—counted in a single episode. The figures will not match previously published data, as revised clinical codes defining bariatric surgery have been used. OPCS-4 codes used: G27.1 Total gastrectomy and excision of surrounding tissue G27.2 Total gastrectomy and anastomosis of oesophagus to duodenum G27.3 Total gastrectomy and interposition of jejunum G27.4 Total gastrectomy and anastomosis of oesophagus to transposed jejunum G27.5 Total gastrectomy and anastomosis of oesophagus to jejunum NEC G27.8 Other specified total excision of stomach G27.9 Unspecified total excision of stomach G28.1 Partial gastrectomy and anastomosis of stomach to duodenum G28.2 Partial gastrectomy and anastomosis of stomach to transposed jejunum G28.3 Partial gastrectomy and anastomosis of stomach to jejunum NEC G28.4 Sleeve gastrectomy and duodenal switch G28.5 Sleeve gastrectomy NEC G28.9 Unspecified partial excision of stomach G30:1 Gastroplasty NEC G30.3 Partitioning of stomach using band G30.4 Partitioning, of stomach using staples G31.1 Bypass of stomach by anastomosis of oesophagus to duodenum G31.2 Bypass of stomach by anastomosis of stomach to duodenum G31.3 Revision of anastomosis of stomach to duodenum G31.4 Conversion to anastomosis of stomach to duodenum G31.5 Closure of connection of stomach to duodenum G31.6 Attention to connection of stomach to duodenum G31.8 Other specified connection of stomach to duodenum G31.9 Unspecified connection of stomach to duodenum G31.0 Conversion from previous anastomosis of stomach to duodenum G32.1 Bypass of stomach by anastomosis of stomach to transposed jejunum G32.2 Revision of anastomosis of stomach to transposed jejunum G32.3 Conversion to anastomosis of stomach to transposed jejunum G32.4 Closure of connection of stomach to transposed jejunum G32.5 Attention to connection of stomach to transposed jejunum G32.8 Other specified connection of stomach to transposed jejunum G32.9 Unspecified connection of stomach to transposed jejunum G32.0 Conversion from previous anastomosis of stomach to transposed jejunum G33.1 Bypass of stomach by anastomosis of stomach to jejunum NEC G33.2 Revision of anastomosis of stomach to jejunum NEC G33.3 Conversion to anastomosis of stomach to jejunum NEC G33.4 Open reduction of intussusception of gastroenterostomy G33.5 Closure of connection of stomach to jejunum NEC G33.6 Attention to connection of stomach to jejunum G33.8 Other specified other connection of stomach to jejunum G33.9 Unspecified other connection of stomach to jejunum G33.0 Conversion from previous anastomosis of stomach to jejunum NEC G38.7 Removal of gastric band G48.1 Insertion of gastric bubble G48.2 Attention to gastric bubble G71.6 Duodenal switch (4) Socio-economic group The socio-economic group used is derived from the Index of Multiple Deprivation (IMD). IMD is a measure of multiple deprivation which ranks the relative deprivation of each area of England in a number domains (such as crime and income) and then combines the individual scores to produce a composite score for each area. The patient's residential postcode is then mapped to one of these areas and summarised into 10 groups for presentation The version of IMD used was published in 2004. See: http://www.communities.gov.uk/documents/communities/pdf/131206.pdf for further details. (5) Ethnicity Ethnicity data may not be good enough to allow accurate analysis, including analysis of ethnic differences. Ethnic group was collected from 1 April 1995 to 31 March 2002 and ethnic category, using the definitions in the 2001 census, from 1 April 2002. Patients are asked to select their category from a standard list, and some decline to do this. Data may therefore be incomplete and of poor quality. (6) Assessing growth through time HES figures are available from 1989-90 onwards. Changes to the figures over time need to be interpreted in the context of improvements in data quality and coverage (particularly in earlier years), improvements in coverage of independent sector activity (particularly from 2006-07) and changes in NHS practice. For example, apparent reductions in activity may be due to a number of procedures which may now be undertaken in out-patient settings and so no longer include in admitted patient HES data. (7 )There was a change in the ethnic categories during this period and while some providers adopted the new definitions others still used the old definition. Note: Data quality HES are compiled from data sent by more than 300 NHS trusts and primary care trusts in England and from some independent sector organisations for activity commissioned by the English NHS. The NHS Information Centre for health and social care liaises closely with these organisations to encourage submission of complete and valid data and seeks to minimise inaccuracies. While this brings about improvement over time, some shortcomings remain. Source: Hospital Episode Statistics (HES), Health and Social Care Information Centre

11 Jun 2012 : Column 155W

Oestrogen

Ms Abbott: To ask the Secretary of State for Health if he will make an assessment of the amount of oestrogen in drinking tap water; and if he will make an assessment of the amount of oestrogen found in takeaway food. [109797]

Anne Milton: The Drinking Water Inspectorate, on behalf of the Secretary of State for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs, my right hon. Friend the Member for Meriden (Mrs Spelman), has carried out and published a risk assessment on endocrine disrupting chemicals, including oestrogen hormones. The most recent evidence shows that it is highly unlikely that these substances are present in drinking water. In addition, water companies are required by law to risk assess each water supply and to test the raw water for any substances that might be present at a level of concern to public health.

Oestrogens are natural hormones and as such will be found in foods of animal origin such as meat, eggs and milk. Oestrogenic hormones are produced naturally by some plants. Very low levels of various synthetic chemicals with oestrogenic activity can also be present in some foods. Any takeaway food comprising one or more of these ingredients may contain traces of oestrogens. The Food Standards Agency has not conducted any survey to assess the levels of oestrogens in takeaway foods and has no plans to do so.

Departmental Administration Costs

Mr Redwood: To ask the Secretary of State for Health how much was spent on the administration of his Department in (a) 2009-10, (b) 2010-11 and (c) 2011-12. [109838]

Mr Simon Burns: Administrative expenditure is published in the Department's Annual Report and Accounts. Figures for 2009-10 and 2010-11 were £227.2 million and £247.3 million respectively. Administration expenditure for 2011-12 will be published in the 2011-12 Annual Report and Accounts.

Organs: Donors

Chris Skidmore: To ask the Secretary of State for Health how many donated organs were discarded by the NHS in each financial year since 1997-98. [110257]

Anne Milton: The information requested is provided in the following table:

Organs donated in the United Kingdom for transplant but not used, April 1997 to March 2012
Number
 KidneyPancreas(1)HeartLungLiverTotal

1997-98

70

20

9

52

34

185

1998-99

84

7

12

54

37

194

1999-2000

76

5

11

22

37

151

2000-01

89

7

5

35

39

175

2001-02

80

21

8

40

32

181

2002-03

76

33

9

42

52

212

2003-04

49

33

6

48

40

176

2004-05

93

33

3

62

46

237

2005-06

90

48

4

64

61

267

11 Jun 2012 : Column 156W

2006-07

62

47

6

33

48

196

2007-08

100

108

3

36

50

297

2008-09

131

162

3

65

69

430

2009-10

164

170

2

50

75

461

2010-11

178

189

4

40

88

499

2011-12

193

161

0

18

94

466

Total

1,535

1,044

85

661

802

4,127

(1) Including islets (since 2008-09). Source: NHS Blood and Transplant (NHSBT).
Reasons for non-use
 Percentage

Organ

57.7

Donor

9.3

Recipient

2.7

Logistical

1.2

Other

29.2

Source: NHSBT.

The introduction of the Organ Donation Taskforce recommendations has meant more families being approached and subsequently agreeing to donate their loved ones’ organs. This has resulted in a steady increase in the number of transplants in this country over the past seven years, and a 34% increase in deceased donation since 2007-08. However by approaching more potential donors this has also increased the number of donors whose organs are unsuitable for donation.

The reason for non-use of organs is recorded as one of five categories. The most common reason is because of a problem with the organ itself, which on retrieval leads to the organ being classed as unsuitable for transplantation. Other reasons include a problem with the donor such as background checks highlighting a previous health condition; a problem with a recipient for example if they become too unwell for transplant to take place; or logistical issues such as the timeframe to get the organ to the recipient hospital being too short. Where the reason for not accepting an organ for transplant is more detailed than fits in the above categories or the reason is not clarified by the transplant centre, it is recorded as ‘other'.

Out-patients: Attendance

Dr Poulter: To ask the Secretary of State for Health what the average cost to the NHS is of a missed out-patient appointment. [109641]

Mr Simon Burns: No estimates have been made centrally of the cost to the NHS of missed out-patient appointments.

Palliative Care

Gareth Johnson: To ask the Secretary of State for Health what steps his Department is taking to support awareness of palliative care facilities and services. [109530]

Paul Burstow: We are continuing with the implementation of the Department's “End of Life Care Strategy”. The strategy recognises the importance of ensuring patients, carers and families have timely access to relevant information

11 Jun 2012 : Column 157W

about conditions and services. Patients and carers should be appropriately assessed and offered a care plan, which will provide much of this information.

The National Institute for Health and Clinical Excellence's “Quality Standard for End of life care for adults”, published in November 2011, sets out the importance of people approaching the end of life and their families and carers being provided with information and, for people approaching the end of life, being offered a personalised care plan.

The NHS Choices website has a range of information on health and care services as well as information on health issues.

www.nhs.uk

Brandon Lewis: To ask the Secretary of State for Health what the cost was of palliative care in acute hospitals in England and Wales in (a) 2009, (b) 2010 and (c) 2011. [109909]

Paul Burstow: This information is not collected centrally.

For England, the Department conducted a special exercise to collect information on expenditure by primary care trusts on specialist palliative care for adults in 2010-11. These data include some information on expenditure in hospitals. However, as this is specialist palliative care only, it does not provide a full picture of palliative care expenditure in hospitals. These data are available on the Department's website:

www.dh.gov.uk/en/Publicationsandstatistics/Publications/PublicationsPolicyAndGuidance/DH_086277

The health service in Wales is a devolved responsibility.

Mr Charles Walker: To ask the Secretary of State for Health what requirements are placed on hospitals to inform next of kin when a “do not resuscitate” order is put in place; and if he will make a statement. [110078]

Anne Milton: The British Medical Association, the Resuscitation Council (UK) and the Royal College of Nursing have issued a joint statement “Decisions relating to Cardiopulmonary Resuscitation (2007)”, which includes guidance on communication and discussion with patients, or those close to patients who lack capacity, around such complex and sensitive decisions, and can be found at:

www.resus.org.uk/pages/dnar.htm

The Department commends this guidance as an appropriate basis for hospital trusts to develop resuscitation policies.

11 Jun 2012 : Column 158W

The General Medical Council has also published detailed guidance on making decisions on cardiopulmonary resuscitation in “Treatment and care towards the end of life: good practice in decision making (2010)”. This encompasses the discussions that doctors must consider when making decisions about cardiopulmonary resuscitation. This guidance can be found at:

www.gmc-uk.org/End_of_life.pdf_32486688.pdf

Postgraduate Education: Fees and Charges

Paul Blomfield: To ask the Secretary of State for Health how much his Department provided for postgraduate course fees at higher education institutions in England in 2011-12. [109385]

Anne Milton: This information is not collected by the Department.

Postgraduate training covers a wide range of professions and may be funded by individual employers, the individual or through the multi-professional education and training budget dependent on the course undertaken.

The MPET budget for 2012-13 is £4.9 billion. This budget funds education and training for health care professions, part of which covers postgraduate education and training for 44,649 medical trainees.

MPET is not ring-fenced. Strategic health authorities (SHAs), in conjunction with their associated deaneries, higher educations institutes, primary care trusts and national health service trusts are responsible for commissioning the appropriate level of health care workforce training posts to meet the needs of the local population. It is the responsibility of SHAs to invest the budget appropriately, as local NHS organisations are best placed to assess the health needs of their local health community and plan the workforce they require to deliver services for patients.

Primary Care Trusts: North West

Helen Jones: To ask the Secretary of State for Health how much funding has been allocated to each primary care trust in the North West in 2012-13; and if he will estimate the funding that they would receive if age rather than deprivation had been the prime determinant of funding allocations. [109938]

Mr Simon Burns: The revenue allocations made to primary care trusts (PCTs) in the North West in 2012-13 are provided in the following table.

PCTTotal revenue allocations (£000)Growth in total revenue allocations (£000)Growth in total revenue allocations (%)

Ashton, Leigh and Wigan PCT

589,137

16,064

2.8

Blackburn with Darwen Teaching Care Trust Plus

298,192

8,084

2.8

Blackpool PCX

301,794

8,205

2.8

Bolton PCT

502,437

13,746

2.8

Bury PCT

324,995

8,843

2.8

Central and Eastern Cheshire PCT

745,929

20,305

2.8

Central Lancashire PCT

791,192

21,515

2.8

Cumbria Teaching PCT

893,078

24,404

2.8

East Lancashire Teaching PCT

717,666

19,601

2.8

Halton and St Helens PCT

615,521

16,845

2.8

11 Jun 2012 : Column 159W

11 Jun 2012 : Column 160W

Heywood, Middleton and Rochdale PCT

407,377

11,150

2.8

Knowsley PCT

344,256

9,416

2.8

Liverpool PCT

1,034,541

28,195

2.8

Manchester PCT

1,061,585

29,076

2.8

North Lancashire Teaching PCT

593,728

16,276

2.8

Oldham PCT

434,044

11,866

2.8

Salford PCT

489,352

13,300

2.8

Sefton PCT

550,990

14,962

2.8

Stockport PCT

495,946

13,471

2.8

Tameside and Glossop PCT

441,929

11,988

2.8

Trafford PCT

389,916

10,594

2.8

Warrington PCT

334,239

9,104

2.8

Western Cheshire PCT

427,388

11,638

2.8

Wirral PCT

647,784

17,619

2.8

Notes: 1. Total revenue allocations include PCT recurrent allocations and non-recurrent allocations for primary dental care, pharmaceutical services, general ophthalmic services and support for joint working between health and social care. 2. The weighted capitation formula was not applied for the PCT recurrent revenue allocations in 2012-13 and all PCTs received a uniform uplift. This was to allow PCTs stability in a year of transition.

Age is the primary determinant of an individual's need for health care along with other factors and these are reflected in the PCT allocations formula.

It is not possible to estimate what allocations would have been under different formulae and different decisions on the pace of movement in allocations towards those determined by the formula; this would be little more than speculation.

Prostate Cancer

Oliver Colvile: To ask the Secretary of State for Health if he will consider including one and five-year survival rates for prostate cancer in the NHS Outcomes Framework. [109387]

Paul Burstow: The NHS Outcomes Framework is designed to be a balanced, high-level set of outcome goals that signal improving quality across the breadth of national health service services. We consulted fully on which indicators to include in it, and selected indicators across a range of population groups and health conditions.

We considered including a specific indicator on prostate cancer but decided that it was not suitable, because one-year and five-year cancer survival can artificially be elevated by increased prostate specific antigen testing, without necessarily reducing mortality.

However, the Outcomes Framework contains seven indicators on cancer, including the under-75 mortality rate from cancer, which covers prostate cancer alongside all other types of cancer.

Publications

Jonathan Ashworth: To ask the Secretary of State for Health how many publications have been issued by his Department since May 2010. [109821]

Mr Simon Burns: In the period 1 May 2010 to 23 May 2012, there were 650 publications added to the Department’s website at:

www.dh.gov.uk/health/category/publications

Sexually Transmitted Infections

Ms Abbott: To ask the Secretary of State for Health how many people in each (a) socio-economic, (b) ethnic and (c) age group were diagnosed with a sexually transmitted disease in each of the last 10 years. [109603]

Anne Milton: The data collected by the Health Protection Agency (HPA) on all acute sexually transmitted infections (STIs) by socio-economic deprivation, ethnicity and age group are available only for 2009 and 2010.

The information is provided in tables 1, 2 and 3 as follows. Tables 1 and 2 contain data from genitourinary medicine (GUM) clinics only as data by ethnicity and area of residence are not collected in all community settings reporting chlamydia data. Table 3 contains data from GUM clinics and also chlamydia diagnoses made in community settings in the 15 to 24-year-old age group.

Acute STIs include the following diagnoses:

Chlamydia (complicated and uncomplicated);

Gonorrhoea (complicated and uncomplicated);

Syphilis (primary, secondary and early latent);

Genital Herpes simplex (first episode);

Genital Warts (first episode);

Non-specific genital infection/urethritis;

Chancroid;

Lymphogranuloma venerum (LGV);

Donovanosis;

Molluscum contagiosum;

Trichomoniasis;

Scabies; and

Pediculus pubis.

Table 1: The number and rates of acute STIs by deprivation quintile using the Index of Multiple Deprivation, England, 2009-10
 NumberRates per 100,000 population
Deprivation Quintile2009201020092010

Most deprived

83,567

87,467

816.0

854.1

2nd most deprived

74,028

75,350

718.0

730.8

11 Jun 2012 : Column 161W

3rd most deprived

55,526

55,645

533.3

534.4

4th most deprived

44,288

45,354

426.7

436.9

Least deprived

38,523

39,224

368.1

374.8

Notes: 1. Data are sourced from the Genitourinary Medicine Clinic Activity Dataset (GUMCAD) and are collected from all GUM clinics in England. 2. GUMCAD does not collect data on the socio-economic status of individuals. Data on the area of residence of patients attending GUM clinics are collected and this was used to assign each patient to a Lower Super Output Area (LSOA) in England. Deprivation was measured using the Index of Multiple Deprivation (IMD) for each in England. All LSOAs were ranked according to the IMD score and assigned to quintiles (IMD group 1—least deprived; IMD group 5—most deprived). 3. LSOA data was not known for around 37,000 cases in 2009 and 17,000 cases in 2010 and so are excluded from the table. 4. The data available from the GUMCAD returns are the number of diagnoses made, not the number of patients diagnosed. 5. Rates per 100,000 population have been calculated using mid-2009 ONS population estimates. Source: Health Protection Agency, GUMCAD returns. Date of data: 24 May 2012.
Table 2: The number and rates of acute STIs by ethnic group, England, 2009-10
 NumberRates per 100,000 population
Ethnicity2009201020092010

White

244,571

236,938

539.7

522.9

Black or Black British

33,829

32,602

2,223.5

2,142.9

Asian or Asian British

10,338

10,695

326.4

337.7

Mixed

11,696

11,638

1,222.5

1,216.5

Other ethnic group

6,578

6,825

772.4

801.4

Unknown

26,345

21,239

Total

333,357

319,937

643.4

617.5

Notes: 1. Data are sourced from the Genitourinary Medicine Clinic Activity Dataset (GUMCAD) and are collected from all GUM clinics in England. 2. The data available from the GUMCAD returns are the number of diagnoses made, not the number of patients diagnosed. 3. Ethnicity was patient defined and was classified into standardised national health service categories. 4. Rates per 100,000 population have been calculated using mid-2009 ONS population estimates. Source: Health Protection Agency, GUMCAD returns. Date of data: 25 May 2012.

11 Jun 2012 : Column 162W

Table 3: The number and rates of acute STIs by age group, Englan, 2009-10
 NumberRates per 100,000 population
Age group2009201020092010

<15

668

601

54.7

49.1

15 to 19

108,448

104,858

3,274.6

3,210.2

20 to 24

153,343

152,661

4,314.3

4,233.8

25 to 34

99,637

97,401

1,470.7

1,412.7

35 to 44

38,523

37,386

506.2

500.5

45 to 64

20,103

20,895

154.1

157.8

65+

1,151

1,238

13.6

14.4

Unknown

104

145

Total

421,977

415,185

814.5

794.9

Notes: 1. Data are spurced from the Genitourinary Medicine Clinic Activity Dataset (GUMCAD), National Chlamydia Screening Programme (NCSP) and non-GUM, non-NCSP returns. 2. The data available are the number of diagnoses made, not the number of patients diagnosed. 3. The 15 to 24-year-old age group also contains data on chlamydia diagnoses made in community settings. 4. The NCSP offers opportunistic chlamydia screening to those aged 15 to 24 years attending a variety of non-GUM clinic settings. 5. Rates per 100,000 population have been calculated using mid-2009 and mid-2010 ONS population estimates. Source: Health Protection Agency, GUMCAD returns, NCSP returns and non-GUM, non-NCSP returns. Date of data: 25 May 2012.

Prior to 2009 data on STIs were collected through the KC60 data returns. This was an aggregate data return and the data are not available in the requested breakdown. Data by age group are available for 2001 to 2010 for the following STIs only (chlamydia, gonorrhoea, genital herpes, genital warts, and syphilis) and are included in table 4.

Table 4: The number of diagnoses for selected STIs by age group, England, 2001-10
STIAge group-2001200220032004200520062007200820092010

Chlamydia

<15

236

243

300

304

317

328

332

356

281

272

 

15 to 19

17,294

20,580

23,158

25,375

25,975

26,115

28,479

64,755

71,603

70,946

 

20 to 24

24,435

28,865

32,444

35,853

37,053

38,133

40,788

72,178

81,942

83,392

 

25 to 34

18,747

20,007

20,898

22,318

23,181

24,534

26,280

27,123

26,160

25,242

 

35 to 44

4,928

5,435

5,701

5,836

6,051

6,367

6,844

6,669

6,651

6,487

 

45 to 64

1,125

1,245

1,328

1,556

1,747

1,903

2,227

2,405

2,608

2,807

 

65+

59

57

78

73

65

87

83

95

94

131

 

Unknown

2,587

2,839

2,688

2,901

2,902

2,910

3,474

3,360

17

37

 

Total

69,411

79,271

86,595

94,216

97,291

100,377

108,507

176,941

189,356

189,314

            

Gonorrhoea

<15

72

96

85

62

71

49

60

47

47

42

 

15 to 19

4,668

5,028

4,863

4,378

3,490

3,345

3,631

3,287

3,231

3,017

 

20 to 24

6,094

6,701

6,661

5,839

4,978

4,791

4,952

4,334

4,826

4,941

 

25 to 34

6,684

7,137

6,774

5,891

5,086

5,044

4,780

4,192

4,719

5,244

 

35 to 44

3,091

3,413

3,352

2,963

2,672

2,526

2,205

1,800

2,123

2,293

 

45 to 64

1,033

1,119

1,155

1,082

983

1,052

1,004

917

1,132

1,232

 

65+

57

52

51

60

42

63

42

36

60

54

 

Unknown

499

577

405

394

310

321

445

372

6

12

11 Jun 2012 : Column 163W

11 Jun 2012 : Column 164W

 

Total

22,198

24,123

23,346

20,669

17,632

17,191

17,119

14,985

16,144

16,835

            
            

Anogenital herpes: first episode

<15

47

38

46

31

35

33

56

67

55

46

 

15 to 19

2,487

2,404

2,444

2,542

2,647

3,075

3,735

4,083

3,942

4,155

 

20 to 24

4,298

4,518

4,337

4,382

4,748

5,336

6,481

7,073

7,685

8,206

 

25 to 34

5,990

5,900

5,864

5,528

5,762

6,129

7,363

8,272

8,896

9,629

 

35 to 44

2,604

2,894

2,870

2,788

2,699

3,027

3,588

3,991

4,114

4,485

 

45 to 64

1,261

1,358

1,273

1,335

1,391

1,553

2,024

2,446

2,681

3,077

 

65+

88

74

68

84

82

93

138

154

158

190

 

Unknown

31

73

1

4

15

8

102

8

5

6

 

Total

16,806

17,259

16,903

16,694

17,379

19,254

23,487

26,094

27,536

29,794

            

Syphilis: primary, secondary and early latent

<15

0

2

0

0

10

1

2

4

0

0

 

15 to 19

23

43

52

62

102

108

88

76

115

85

 

20 to 24

91

124

160

222

345

298

291

267

368

334

 

25 to 34

261

409

539

642

758

686

685

582

904

844

 

35 to 44

194

366

461

668

726

783

688

626

846

773

 

45 to 64

90

162

222

316

406

382

417

423

583

556

 

65+

8

11

13

16

21

33

32

19

32

49

 

Unknown

368

443

558

700

818

825

1,004

877

3

9

 

Total

1,035

1,560

2,005

2,626

3,186

3,116

3,207

2,874

2,851

2,650

            

Anogenital warts: first episode

<15

143

155

155

146

139

138

153

149

142

108

 

15 to 19

11,383

11,518

12,192

13,220

13,490

14,225

15,653

16,364

15,973

14,463

 

20 to 24

20,625

21,177

21,893

23,049

23,532

24,129

25,814

27,109

26,825

26,750

 

25 to 34

19,756

19,885

19,689

19,977

20,014

20,157

21,593

22,141

22,119

21,587

 

35 to 44

6,600

7,097

7,207

7,518

7,305

7,478

7,926

7,959

8,168

7,778

 

45 to 64

2,702

2,754

2,986

3,108

3,171

3,358

3,632

4,109

4,252

4,368

 

65+

203

183

188

212

189

210

272

313

316

310

 

Unknown

93

213

9

21

12

5

229

12

50

51

 

Total

61,505

62,982

64,319

67,251

67,852

69,700

75,272

78,156

77,845

75,415

Notes: 1. Data are sourced from the KC60 return (2001-08), Genitourinary Medicine Clinic Activity Dataset (GUMCAD) (2009-10), National Chlamydia Screening Programme (NCSP) and non-GUM, non-NCSP returns (2008-10). 2. The data available are the number of diagnoses made, not the number of patients diagnosed. 3. The chlamydia 15 to 24-year-old age group also contains data on chlamydia diagnoses made in community settings. 4. The NCSP offers opportunistic chlamydia screening to those aged 15 to 24 years attending a variety of non-GUM clinic settings. Source: Health Protection Agency, KC60 returns, GUMCAD returns, NCSP returns and non-GUM, non-NCSP returns.