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Written Answers to Questions

Tuesday 26 June 2012

Wales

Energy

Caroline Flint: To ask the Secretary of State for Wales whether her Department has switched its (a) gas or (b) electricity supplier in any of the last 10 years. [113452]

Mr David Jones: Electricity for the Wales Office's London building is supplied under a Ministry of Justice contract and the supplier has not changed during the period requested.

The Wales Office is not supplied with gas.

Caroline Flint: To ask the Secretary of State for Wales which energy supplier supplies her Department with (a) gas and (b) electricity. [113490]

Mr David Jones: Electricity for the Wales Office's London building is supplied by British Gas under a Ministry of Justice contract. Energy for the Department's Cardiff leased office space is provided for the building as a whole by the Landlord.

The Wales Office is not supplied with gas.

Caroline Flint: To ask the Secretary of State for Wales how much her Department has spent on its (a) gas and (b) electricity bills in each of the last 10 years. [113511]

Mr David Jones: The Wales Office holds information on spends against electricity from financial year 2004-05. The total spends for each year is shown as follows:

 Electricity (£)

2004-05

5,308

2005-06

4,132

2006-07

5,054

2007-08

4,007

2008-09

7,416

2009-10

9,730

2010-11

12,468

2011-12

-6.078

The Wales Office does not have a gas supply.

Government Procurement Card

Rachel Reeves: To ask the Secretary of State for Wales how many procurement card holders in her Department were (a) paid off-payroll, (b) employed on a part-time basis and (c) employed as a non-permanent employee in (i) 2009-10, (ii) 2010-11 and (iii) 2011-12. [113332]

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Mr David Jones: One part-time and one non-permanent member of staff held Government procurement cards in 2010-11 and 2011-12. The Wales Office does not pay any staff off-payroll.

Rachel Reeves: To ask the Secretary of State for Wales on which dates her Department has published Government procurement card spending over £500 since May 2010. [113350]

Mr David Jones: In line with Cabinet Office guidelines the Wales Office first published procurement card spending on both the Wales Office and Data.Gov websites on 30 September 2011. Since that date, data on spend exceeding £500 has been published quarterly. We most recently published data on 8 March 2012.

Tanks

Mr Hollobone: To ask the Secretary of State for Wales what discussions she has had with the Secretary of State for Defence on the future of tank regiments in Wales. [113917]

Mrs Gillan: I have had a number of discussions about the structure of regiments in Wales as part of the study into the Army's future force structure. The outcome of the study will be announced once decisions have been made. Until then it is not possible to comment on which specific units may be affected.

Cabinet Office

Energy

Caroline Flint: To ask the Minister for the Cabinet Office (1) how much has spent on (a) gas and (b) electricity bills for the Deputy Prime Minister's office since May 2011; [113492]

(2) how much his Department has spent on its (a) gas and (b) electricity bills for the Prime Minister's Office in each of the last 10 years. [113493]

Mr Maude: The Prime Minister's Office and Deputy Prime Minister’s are integral parts of the Cabinet Office.

Corona Energy and Shell supply gas while EDF Energy, British Gas and Npower supply electricity to the Department.

The central London Cabinet Office estate and Rosebery Court have retained the same gas and electricity suppliers for the last 10 years while the Central Office of Information switched suppliers in 2005 and the Emergency Planning College, York, in 2011.

The amount spent on gas and electricity over the last 10 years can be provided only at disproportionate cost.

Public Services: Transparency

Stephen Timms: To ask the Minister for the Cabinet Office pursuant to the answer of 20 June 2012, Official Report, column 1074W, on public services, what transparency commitments the Department for Work and Pensions is being required to follow; and on what date they were set. [113913]

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Mr Maude: Transparency commitments related to Government spend were set out in the Prime Minister's letters of 31 May 2010 and 7 July 2011.

Public Policy Research: Members

Mr Chope: To ask the Minister for the Cabinet Office if he will make it his policy that his Department will not commission or fund research into the opinions of hon. Members on issues of public policy; and if he will make a statement. [110291]

Mr Maude [holding answer 11 June 2012]: Commissioning of research and the proposed field for the research will be considered on a case-by-case basis.

Unemployment: Young People

Steve McCabe: To ask the Minister for the Cabinet Office how many young people have been unemployed for more than a year in (a) England, (b) the west midlands and (c) south Birmingham. [113840]

Mr Hurd: The information requested falls within the responsibility of the UK Statistics Authority. I have asked the authority to reply.

Letter from Stephen Penneck, dated June 2012:

As Director General for the Office for National Statistics, I have been asked to reply to your Parliamentary Question asking how many young people have been unemployed for more than a year in (a) England; (b) the West Midlands and (c) South Birmingham. (113840)

The Office for National Statistics (ONS) compiles unemployment statistics in line with International Labour Organisation (ILO) definitions for local areas from the Annual Population Survey (APS).

Table 1 shows the number of people aged 16 to 24 who have been unemployed for more than 12 months in England and the West Midlands, from the APS, for the 12 month period ending March 2012, which is the latest available estimate. However, due to small sample sizes estimates of the number of people aged 16 to 24 claiming for more than a year resident in South Birmingham are not available.

As with any sample survey, estimates from the APS are subject to a margin of uncertainty. A guide to the quality of the estimates is given in the table.

National and local area estimates for many labour market statistics, including employment, unemployment and claimant count are available on the NOMIS website at:

http://www.nomisweb.co.uk

Table 1: Number of people aged 16 to 24 resident in England and the west midlands who are unemployed for more than a year
Thousand
12 months ending March 2012Level

England

*193

West Midlands

***23

South Birmingham

****(1)

(1) Data has not been supplied as it has been classed as unreliable. Note: Coefficients of Variation have been calculated for the latest period as an indication of the quality of the estimates. See following Guide to Quality. Guide to Quality: The Coefficient of Variation (CV) indicates the quality of an estimate, the smaller the CV value the higher the quality. The true value is likely to lie within +/- twice the CV—for example, for an estimate of 200 with a CV of 5% we would expect the population total to be within the range 180-220. Key: * 0 = CV<5%—Statistical Robustness: Estimates are considered precise. ** 5 = CV <10%—Statistical Robustness: Estimates are considered reasonably precise. *** 10 = CV <20%—Statistical Robustness: Estimates are considered acceptable. **** CV ? 20%—Statistical Robustness: Estimates are considered too unreliable for practical purposes. Source: Annual Population Survey

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Scotland

Energy

Caroline Flint: To ask the Secretary of State for Scotland whether his Department has switched its (a) gas or (b) electricity supplier in any of the last 10 years. [113451]

David Mundell: The Scotland Office has changed its gas and electricity suppliers on a number of occasions in the last 10 years.

Caroline Flint: To ask the Secretary of State for Scotland which energy supplier supplies his Department with (a) gas and (b) electricity. [113489]

David Mundell: The Scotland Office is supplied with gas by Total and with electricity by Scottish Power and British Gas.

Caroline Flint: To ask the Secretary of State for Scotland how much his Department has spent on its (a) gas and (b) electricity bills in each of the last 10 years. [113510]

Michael Moore: The Scotland Office spend on gas and electricity in the last ten years is shown in the following table:

£
 ElectricityGas

2002-03

28,439

88,244

2003-04

23,703

88,085

2004-05

23,372

96,362

2005-06

21,650

106,883

2006-07

36,488

105,968

2007-08

26,481

78,669

2008-09

30,728

100,262

2009-10

33,809

63,057

2010-11

22,315

89,435

2011-12

19,733

69,517

Government Procurement Card

Rachel Reeves: To ask the Secretary of State for Scotland how many procurement card holders in his Department were (a) paid off-payroll, (b) employed on a part-time basis and (c) employed as a non-permanent employee in (i) 2009-10, (ii) 2010-11 and (iii) 2011-12. [113333]

Michael Moore: All Scotland Office staff are paid through payroll. None of the staff who hold procurement cards are either part time or non-permanent employees.

Rachel Reeves: To ask the Secretary of State for Scotland on which dates his Department has published Government procurement card spending over £500 since May 2010. [113351]

Michael Moore: The Scotland Office has published the dates of publication of its Government procurement card spending over £500 since May 2010 on the Office's website alongside the data:

http://www.scotlandoffice.gov.uk/scotlandoffice/16203.html

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Northern Ireland

Energy

Caroline Flint: To ask the Secretary of State for Northern Ireland whether his Department has switched its (a) gas or (b) electricity supplier in any of the last 10 years. [113453]

Mr Paterson: My Department has not switched either its gas or electricity supplier in any of the last 10 years.

Caroline Flint: To ask the Secretary of State for Northern Ireland which energy supplier supplies his Department with (a) gas and (b) electricity. [113488]

Mr Paterson: The following suppliers provide my Department with gas and electricity:

Northern Ireland: Northern Ireland Electricity and Phoenix Gas

London: EDF and British Gas

Caroline Flint: To ask the Secretary of State for Northern Ireland how much his Department has spent on its (a) gas and (b) electricity bills in each of the last 10 years. [113509]

Mr Paterson: Figures are only comparable from devolution in April 2010. Since this date my Department has spent the following amount on gas and electricity.

Electricity: £465,950

Gas: £86,163

These figures cover the period April 2010-31 May 2012.

Government Procurement Card

Rachel Reeves: To ask the Secretary of State for Northern Ireland how many procurement card holders in his Department were (a) paid off-payroll, (b) employed on a part-time basis and (c) employed as a non-permanent employee in (i) 2009-10, (ii) 2010-11 and (iii) 2011-12. [113334]

Mr Paterson: Comparable figures for the Department as it is now configured are not available following the completion of devolution of policing and justice functions on 12 April 2010.

Prior to this year the Northern Ireland Office's finance function was delivered by the Department of Justice in Northern Ireland; my Department therefore has information only in relation to 2011-12 which is as follows:

(a) None

(b) One

(c) None

Northern Ireland Grand Committee

Vernon Coaker: To ask the Secretary of State for Northern Ireland what the Government's policy is on the role of the Northern Ireland Grand Committee. [113935]

Mr Paterson: We believe that the Northern Ireland Grand Committee can play an important role in facilitating debate on Northern Ireland issues. For example, since May 2010 the Government has held Grand Committee debates on the implications for Northern Ireland of the comprehensive spending review and the big society agenda.

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Communities and Local Government

Green Belt

John Mann: To ask the Secretary of State for Communities and Local Government whether he expects new areas of land to be designated as green belt following the publication of the National Planning Policy Framework. [113538]

Greg Clark: It is for local authorities to decide if they want to designate new areas of green belt, and if so to take proposals through the Local Plan process which includes public consultation and an independent examination. The National Planning Policy Framework sets out policy on green belt in Section 9 of the document.

John Mann: To ask the Secretary of State for Communities and Local Government what his policy is on (a) new settlements and (b) urban extensions in green belts. [113540]

Greg Clark: As with previous policy on the green belt, the National Planning Policy Framework maintains that inappropriate development is, by definition, harmful to the green belt and should not be approved except in very special circumstances.

The Framework sets out that when considering any planning application, local planning authorities should ensure that substantial weight is given to any harm to the green belt. 'Very special circumstances' will not exist unless the potential harm to the green belt by reason of inappropriateness, and any other harm, is clearly outweighed by other considerations. Local planning authorities should regard the construction of new buildings as inappropriate in green belt. Exceptions to this can be found listed in paragraph 89 of the Framework.

Housing: Construction

Ms Buck: To ask the Secretary of State for Communities and Local Government how many affordable homes are included in the schemes shortlisted for the Get Britain Building programme in each region. [113437]

Grant Shapps: The Get Britain Building scheme is designed to unlock locally-backed stalled sites with planning permission to help restart construction activity. There is no requirement for bids to include affordable units, although the outstanding planning consent granted by the local authority may require affordable units, reflecting local planning policies.

A contributing factor for sites being stalled may be due to economically unrealistic section 106 agreements negotiated at the height of the housing boom—resulting in no development, no regeneration and no community benefits at all. As outlined in the written ministerial statement of 23 March 2011, Official Report, columns 57-58WS, Ministers have encouraged councils to consider such unviable agreements to help facilitate development, particularly on stalled sites. As outlined in November 2011’s Housing Strategy, we intend to take further steps to help unlock sites in this regard.

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The total number of affordable homes included in Expressions of Interest short listed for Get Britain Building funding in March 2012 was 1,878. These are broken down by Homes and Communities Agency operating area in the following table:

Homes and Communities Agency operating areaNumber of affordable homes

East and South East

229

London

526

Midlands

376

North East, Yorkshire and the Humber

263

North West

117

South and South West

367

This table is only for first round, shortlisted Expressions of Interest; the completions are likely to be lower than Expressions of Interest, in part due to the due diligence and contract agreement process. The prospectus for the second round was published by the Homes and Communities Agency on 21 June 2012.

Planning Permission

Stuart Andrew: To ask the Secretary of State for Communities and Local Government how he proposes that neighbourhood forums and neighbourhood plans developed in areas not represented by parish or town councils will be funded. [113854]

Robert Neill: The Government have committed to providing up to £50 million until March 2015 to support local councils in making neighbourhood planning a success. As part of this in 2011-12 the neighbourhood planning front runners programme made available £4.66 million to local planning authorities to support the development of neighbourhood plans. We are considering funding options for 2012-13, 2014-15 and 2015-16 and will make an announcement in due course.

The Department has made available £4.25 million to date to four organisations (the Prince's Foundation for Building Community; the Royal Town Planning Institute; Locality (the Building Communities Consortium) and the Campaign to Protect Rural England (working with National Association of Local Councils) as part of the Supporting Communities in Neighbourhood Planning scheme to enable communities that wish to engage in planning at either the neighbourhood or local level to access free advice and support. Local businesses, landowners and developers may also be interested in sponsoring and taking a role in neighbourhood planning.

Further information about neighbourhood planning is available at

http://communityrights.communities.gov.uk/what-are-community-rights/neighbourhood-planning

Attorney-General

Energy

Caroline Flint: To ask the Attorney-General (1) whether the Law Officers' Departments have switched (a) gas or (b) electricity supplier in any of the last 10 years; [113470]

(2) which energy supplier supplies the Law Officers' Departments with (a) gas and (b) electricity. [113491]

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The Attorney-General: The Treasury Solicitors Department manages the gas and electricity suppliers for the Treasury Solicitor's Department (TSol), HM Crown Prosecution Service Inspectorate (HMCPSI) and (since May 2007) the Attorney-General's Office (AGO). The AGO does not hold any information on energy suppliers prior to this date.

The following is a list of these suppliers for the past 10 years:

Electricity

TSol: Queen Anne's Chambers

2002-05 London Energy and London Electricity.

TSol: One Kemble Street

2005-06 E.ON

2007-08 SWALEC

2008-09 npower

2009 to present EDF.

TSol: Riverside Chambers Taunton

2002-04 South Western Electricity

2004 to present British Gas.

TSol: Southern House Croydon

2010-present E.ON.

HMCPSI: Old Queen Street (to 2011)

EDF.

AGO: Victoria Street (from May 2007)

EDF.

Gas

TSol: Queen Anne's Chambers

2002-05 Corona Energy.

TSol: One Kemble Street

No gas supplied to this building.

TSol: Riverside Chambers Taunton

2002 to present Corona Energy.

TSol: Southern House Croydon

2010 to present Gazprom.

HMCPSI: Old Queen Street (to 2011)

Corona.

AGO: Victoria Street (from May 2007)

E.ON (standing charge only).

The SFO currently has two sites, Elm House on Elm Street and part of the ITN building on Gray's Inn Road.

At Elm House, gas is supplied by Corona and electricity is supplied by EDF Energy. These suppliers have provided the gas and electricity for the last 10 years as part of the Government Procurement Service framework agreements. For the ITN building, the SFO pays the managing agent for its energy consumption through the service charge for this property. The SFO has used this building only since 2005-06.

The Crown Prosecution Service (CPS) is responsible for the purchase of gas and electricity in the buildings it occupies, it does so through a Government Procurement Service framework contract. There has been no change in the contracted suppliers used during any of the last 10 years. At other sites, gas and electricity is supplied under arrangements made by landlords or major occupiers, and is paid for by way of a service charge.

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The Crown Prosecution Service (CPS) purchases gas and electricity from the following suppliers through a Government Procurement Service framework contract:

Gas—Corona Energy;

Electricity—Electricite De France (EDF) (large sites) and; and

British Gas—(small sites).

There are a number of sites occupied by the CPS where arrangements for the supply of gas and electricity are made by commercial landlords under lease arrangements or, by other Government Departments under a Memorandum of Terms of Occupation (MOTO). No data are held on the energy providers used at these sites.

Caroline Flint: To ask the Attorney-General how much the Law Officers' Departments have spent on (a) gas and (b) electricity bills in each of the last 10 years. [113512]

The Attorney-General: The information requested is set out in the following table:

£
 Treasury Solicitors Department(*)Crown ProsecutionServiceSerious Fraud Office

2002-03

   

Gas

30,816

146,647

14,820

Electricity

50,655

855,735

66,119

    

2003-04

   

Gas

31,830

182,345

9,927

Electricity

66,285

944,107

66,486

    

2004-05

   

Gas

42,989

206,643

16,500

Electricity

76,019

1,117,060

83,648

    

2005-06

   

Gas

34,736

269,272

18,162

Electricity

130,947

1,484,482

135,177

    

2006-07

   

Gas

13,025

253,063

29,524

Electricity

149,533

1,436,411

397,585

    

2007-08

   

Gas

5,031

202,443

18,334

Electricity

163,359

1,433,220

168,497

    

2008-09

   

Gas

6,603

329,818

48,116

Electricity

305,042

1,721,698

243,728

    

2009-10

   

Gas

16,486

234,296

24,909

Electricity

272,563

2,094,175

284,350

    

2010-11

   

Gas

8,805

312,684

17,749

Electricity

262,125

1,289,765

205,171

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2011-12

   

Gas

1,557

207,847

21,088

Electricity

249,405

1,344,089

196,443

(* )TSol data also cover the Attorney-General's Office and HM Crown Prosecution Service Inspectorate.

Energy and Climate Change

Advisory Bodies

Martin Caton: To ask the Secretary of State for Energy and Climate Change what the cost to the public purse was of each of the statutory advisory bodies reporting to his Department in the latest period for which figures are available. [113519]

Gregory Barker: The Department of Energy and Climate Change does not have any statutory advisory bodies.

Carbon Sequestration: Yorkshire and Humber

Mr Knight: To ask the Secretary of State for Energy and Climate Change what estimate he has made of the total cost to the public purse of the proposed Yorkshire and Humber Carbon Capture, Transportation and Storage Project. [113405]

Charles Hendry: I have made no estimate of the total cost to the public purse involved in the proposed Yorkshire and Humber Carbon Capture, Transportation and Storage Project. The project may feature in proposals we expect to receive as part of the CCS Commercialisation programme announced on 3 April 2012. If so, the level of public financial support required for these projects will be assessed as part of that process.

Mr Knight: To ask the Secretary of State for Energy and Climate Change what assessment he has made of the security and stability of the technology involved in the proposed Yorkshire and Humber Carbon Capture, Transportation and Storage pipeline project. [113407]

Charles Hendry: I have made no estimate of the security and stability of the pipeline involved in the proposed Yorkshire and Humber Carbon Capture, Transportation and Storage Project. The project may feature in proposals we expect to receive as part of the CCS Commercialisation programme announced on 3 April 2012. If so, the technical feasibility of these projects will be assessed as part of that process.

Mr Knight: To ask the Secretary of State for Energy and Climate Change how much carbon dioxide will be prevented from entering the atmosphere as a result of the proposed Yorkshire and Humber Carbon Capture, Transportation and Storage Project on average each year; and what proportion of the UK annual carbon dioxide emission this represents. [113408]

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Charles Hendry: Individual developers of potential CCS projects are responsible for quantifying this information. The developer's website contains further information about the potential for this project to capture and store carbon dioxide

www.ccshumber.co.uk

It suggests the potential to save tens of millions of tonnes of carbon dioxide every year.

Mr Knight: To ask the Secretary of State for Energy and Climate Change what studies he has commissioned on the possible effects on marine life of the storage of carbon in the seabed by the Yorkshire and Humber Carbon Capture, Transportation and Storage pipeline project. [113409]

Charles Hendry: None. As part of the process of securing the necessary permits to complete the project the developer will have to demonstrate that there will be no significant adverse impact on marine life.

Mr Knight: To ask the Secretary of State for Energy and Climate Change whether he plans to take any additional steps to ensure the prevention of carbon dioxide leaks from the proposed Yorkshire and Humber Carbon Capture, Transportation and Storage Project following the leaks in the Netherlands at Berkel en Rodenrijs in 2008. [113410]

Charles Hendry: The pipeline operator has a legal responsibility to take all reasonable steps, and introduce appropriate measures, to ensure that the pipeline is designed, constructed and operated safely. The Environment Agency are responsible for monitoring that the risks to the environment from the pipeline are assessed by the pipeline operator and that suitable controls are put in place. The Health and Safety Executive (HSE) will oversee that the health and safety risks to people from these work activities are addressed by enforcing the general duties of the Pipelines Safety Regulations 1996.

Coryton Refinery

Mr Iain Wright: To ask the Secretary of State for Energy and Climate Change what assessment he has made of the implications of recent developments in the processing of crude oil at the Coryton refinery for (a) the competitiveness of the UK and (b) the effectiveness of the supply chain in the oil, gas and petroleum industries; and what discussions he has had with the Secretary of State for Business, Innovation and Skills on this matter. [110115]

Charles Hendry: It is disappointing that a buyer has not yet been found for the Coryton refinery. This reflects a general overcapacity in the European refining sector. An assessment of the economic impact on the area has been commissioned by a task force set up by Thurrock council. On the supply chain, the south-east is served by other supply points that enable suppliers to develop and implement existing contingency plans to maintain their supply operations.

The Department has kept in regular contact with the Department for Business, Innovation and Skills about developments at the refinery.

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Stephen Metcalfe: To ask the Secretary of State for Energy and Climate Change what approaches PricewaterhouseCoopers has made to the Government for financial assistance in securing the future of the Coryton Oil Refinery; and if he will make a statement. [113246]

Charles Hendry: The administrators of Coryton Oil Refinery made a formal representation to the Department on 15 May 2012 in respect of the provision of Government assistance for one option relating to Coryton Oil Refinery. We understand that this was one of a range of options the administrators were considering at the time. These representations are necessarily commercially confidential.

Energy: Finance

Laura Sandys: To ask the Secretary of State for Energy and Climate Change if he will publish the total value of (a) subsidies, (b) tax incentives and (c) capital allowances to support (i) oil, (ii) gas, (iii) wind, (iv) solar, (v) biomass, (vi) nuclear and (vii) hydroelectric energy. [113702]

Gregory Barker: The following table shows the total amount paid by technology under renewables obligation from 2003-04 (the year of commencement) to 2010-11 (the last year for which data are available).

Technology£ million (real 2012-13 prices)

Wind

2,921

Solar

1

Biomass(1)

1,667

Hydroelectric

1,037

(1 )This includes co-firing of biomass with fossil fuel, biomass using an advanced conversion technologies, co-firing of energy crops, dedicated biomass, dedicated biomass with combined heat and power (CUP), dedicated energy crops, dedicated energy crops with CHP.

For the period 1 April 2010 to 31 December 2011, a total of £80,748,750.10 was paid for the electricity generated by all the technologies under the Feed-in Tariffs (FITs) scheme. We do not have this information broken down by technology.

There are no subsidies for oil and gas, and no subsidies for nuclear.

The Department does not hold information on the total value of tax incentives or capital allowances. I refer the Member to Her Majesty's Treasury for this information.

Energy: Prices

Caroline Flint: To ask the Secretary of State for Energy and Climate Change pursuant to the oral answer of 16 May 2012, Official Report, column 563, on energy bills, what protection in addition to that provided by the Unfair Trading Regulations 2008 consumers will have following the deal secured with the big six energy companies. [113432]

Charles Hendry: The agreements secured by the Deputy Prime Minister with each of the major energy suppliers are voluntary and do not affect statutory protections. One of the key aims of each agreement is to ensure suppliers are taking more proactive steps to help customers to be on the best tariff for them.

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Caroline Flint: To ask the Secretary of State for Energy and Climate Change with reference to paragraph three on his Department's consultation on a proposed new power for Ofgem to compel regulated energy businesses to provide redress to consumers, what estimate his Department has made of the number of consumers who have taken individual action in the courts against their energy supplier in the latest period for which figures are available. [113436]

Charles Hendry: Consumers who are dissatisfied with their energy company's response to their complaint can refer the matter to the energy ombudsman. The ombudsman received 7,201 complaints about energy suppliers and distributors in 2011-12. This figure is likely to be significantly higher than the number of court actions brought by individuals against their energy supplier, given the greater cost and complexity of pursuing such matters in the courts.

Fuel Poverty

Tom Greatrex: To ask the Secretary of State for Energy and Climate Change what recent estimate he has made of the number of households in (a) the UK, (b) each region of the UK, (c) each local authority in the UK and (d) each parliamentary constituency living in fuel poverty. [114017]

Gregory Barker: In 2010, the latest year for which data is available, the number of households in the UK in fuel poverty was estimated to be 4.75 million. The following table shows the figures for each region.

RegionEstimated number households in fuel poverty

London

331,000

South East

401,000

South West

342,000

West Midlands

485,000

East of England

381,000

East Midlands

341,000

Yorkshire and the Humber

415,000

North West

601,000

North East

238,000

Scotland

658,000

Wales

332,000

Northern Ireland

297,000

Estimates for local authorities and parliamentary constituencies for England can be found on the DECC website:

http://www.decc.gov.uk/en/content/cms/statistics/fuelpov_stats/regional/regional.aspx

For Scotland, estimates for local authority can be found here:

http://www.scotland.gov.uk/Topics/Statistics/SHCS/LA0810

Wales and Northern Ireland do not produce fuel poverty statistics at a local authority or constituency level.

Natural Gas: Imports

Dan Byles: To ask the Secretary of State for Energy and Climate Change what proportion of UK imports of natural gas, including liquefied natural gas, originated from (a) Russia, (b) Norway, (c) Qatar, (d) Algeria and (e) other sources in 2011. [113975]

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Gregory Barker: Provisional figures for imports of natural gas both piped and shipped to the UK in 2011 are contained in the following table.

 Country
 (a) Russia(b) Norway(c) Qatar(d) Algeria(e) Other sources

Gigawatt hours

~0

244,159

230,618

2,647

100,536

Percentage

~0

42.2

39.9

0.5

17.4

The UK has not physically imported any gas directly from Russia. Some Russian gas might exist in gas imported from the Continent, but in negligible amounts.

Imports of natural gas by country are published on the Department of Energy and Climate Change's website at the following address:

http://www.decc.gov.uk/media/viewfile.ashx?filetype=4&filepath=Statistics/source/gas/et4_4.xls&minwidth=true

Renewable Energy: Feed-in Tariffs

Caroline Flint: To ask the Secretary of State for Energy and Climate Change pursuant to the answer of 11 June 2012, Official Report, column 204W, on renewable energy feed-in tariffs, if he will make it his policy to seek parliamentary approval for any agreement between his Department and relevant developers on comfort to support early investment decisions. [113433]

Gregory Barker: The draft energy Bill 2012 contains a number of provisions which would enable the Government to issue what are called “investment instruments” in advance of the regime for Contracts for Difference (CfDs) being established. These provisions have been put in place to allow the Department to offer comfort to developers of low carbon electricity generating projects that need to take final investment decisions ahead of the introduction of the electricity market reforms contained in the draft Bill.

The draft Bill specifies that the issue of an investment instrument is subject to conditions, including that a draft of the instrument has been laid before Parliament. The final issue of the investment instrument is of course subject to the enactment of the draft Bill.

The draft Bill also contains provisions enabling the Secretary of State for Energy and Climate Change to make modifications to electricity supply licences or to make regulations by statutory instrument in connection with investment instruments. Both of these provisions would be subject to annulment in pursuance of a resolution of either House of Parliament.

Dan Byles: To ask the Secretary of State for Energy and Climate Change what discussions he has had with private energy sector investors about the appropriate body to act as the counterparty for the feed-in tariffs with contracts for difference as set out in the draft energy Bill. [113977]

Charles Hendry: The Secretary of State for Energy and Climate Change regularly meets with energy

26 Jun 2012 : Column 171W

sector stakeholders. As part of discussions on Electricity Market Reform, the counterparty arrangements under Contracts for Difference has been raised.

As the Government made clear when publishing the draft energy Bill on 22 May 2012, we recognise that investors need robust counterparty arrangements to invest under Contracts for Difference. Officials at DECC have had detailed discussions with a wide variety of industry stakeholders on both the current proposals and also an alternative model with a single counterparty. A final decision on which model to adopt will be published in the autumn.

Details of meetings between Ministers and external organisations are published quarterly on the departmental website at:

http://www.decc.gov.uk/en/content/cms/accesstoinform/registers/ministermtgs/ministermtgs.aspx

Home Department

Abid Hussain

Michael Dugher: To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department whether (a) she and (b) Ministers in her Department have met Abid Hussain. [112969]

Damian Green: Home Office Ministers and officials have meetings with a wide variety of international partners, as well as organisations and individuals in the public and private sectors, as part of the process of policy development and delivery. As was the case with previous Administrations, it is not the Government's practice to provide details of ail such meetings.

Michael Dugher: To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department whether (a) she, (b) Ministers in her Department and (c) officials in her Department have given advice on the vetting of Abid Hussain to Ministers of the Cabinet Office in relation to her participation in official Government business. [112970]

Damian Green: Neither my right hon. Friend the Secretary of State for the Home Department, Home Office Ministers or officials have given advice on the vetting of Abid Hussain to Ministers of the Cabinet Office in relation to his participation in official Government business.

Animal Experiments

Mr Mike Hancock: To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department how many licences were issued for the animal testing of botulinium toxin in each year since 1997; how many animals of each (a) breed and (b) type were involved; and how much toxin was involved in each case. [113428]

Lynne Featherstone: Authority for the batch testing of botulinum toxin under the Animals (Scientific Procedures) Act 1986 is not granted solely for that purpose and would be included in licences granted for the regulatory testing of various biological toxins. The number of licences issued each year for this purpose since 1997 is not held centrally and could be obtained only at disproportionate cost.

26 Jun 2012 : Column 172W

Typically the type of animal used would be mice. Information on the number of animals used for potency testing of botulinum toxin for human use is not collected for statistical purposes so it is not possible to identify the number of animals used in testing a particular substance or product. Licences for this purpose typically determine the amount of toxin in the substance to be tested (the potency) through dilution assays. There is no agreed measurable unit of potency for botulinum toxin. It can only be assessed as a function of its biological effect on a living organism. Therefore the licences typically would not specify the amount of toxin involved.

Animal Experiments: EU Law

Simon Wright: To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department whether her Department plans to remove the ban on using stray cats and dogs in experiments in the transposition of European Union Directive 2010/63/EU. [113886]

Lynne Featherstone: I refer the hon. Member to the answer given on 21 June 2012, Official Report, columns 1111-12W.

Crime Prevention

Mr Llwyd: To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department what steps she plans to take to reduce crime amongst people who are homeless. [112890]

James Brokenshire: Police forces need to tackle crime in line with local priorities and there is no simple link between homelessness and crime. From November 2012 the election of police and crime commissioners will help drive down crime by making policing more accountable and responsive to local needs and concerns. Police.uk now provides the public with street-level information about crime to enable them to hold local policing teams to account. The Government have swept away central targets and are cutting bureaucracy to help free police officers to cut crime. At a national level, the creation of the National Crime Agency will make the UK a hostile environment for serious and organised criminality.

The Government have maintained funding for the Homelessness Grant at 2010-11 levels with £400 million over the next four years, and announced an additional £70 million investment this year which will: protect vital front line services; enable local authorities to intervene earlier and help people stay in their homes; ensure single homeless people get access to good housing advice; and deliver improved hostel provision.

Mr Llwyd: To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department what steps she plans to take to reduce crime amongst people who are unemployed. [112891]

James Brokenshire: Police forces need to tackle crime in line with local priorities and there is no simple link between unemployment and crime. From November 2012 the election of police and crime commissioners will help drive down crime by making policing more accountable and responsive to local needs and concerns. Police.uk now provides the public with street-level information about crime to enable them to hold local

26 Jun 2012 : Column 173W

policing teams to account. The Government have swept away central targets and are cutting bureaucracy to help free police officers to cut crime. At a national level, the creation of the National Crime Agency will make the UK a hostile environment for serious and organised criminality.

The Government are taking a number of steps to tackle unemployment. The Youth Contract was introduced in April 2012 to provide additional support, worth almost £1 billion, to young unemployed people over the next three years, and from March 2012, the Government provided additional employment support for prison leavers through the Work programme, immediately on release from prison.

Mr Llwyd: To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department what steps she plans to take to reduce crime amongst people who have a (a) numeracy level and (b) reading age below that expected of an 11 year old. [112892]

James Brokenshire: Police forces need to tackle crime in line with local priorities and from November 2012 the election of police and crime commissioners will help drive down crime by making policing more accountable and responsive to local needs and concerns. Police.uk now provides the public with street-level information about crime to enable them to hold local policing teams to account. The Government have swept away central targets and are cutting bureaucracy to help free police officers to cut crime. At a national level, the creation of the National Crime Agency will make the UK a hostile environment for serious and organised criminality.

As part of our support to local partners to tackle crime, we are working across Government to improve life chances, education and employment outcomes. On numeracy and literacy levels, the Government are aiming to ensure that:

no child should leave school without the literacy and numeracy skills to succeed;

young people held in the secure estate have access to a full day of education and constructive activity. Their literacy and numeracy levels are assessed on entry and they receive an individual learning plan to address their learning needs whilst in custody; and

those who have already offended are given the skills they will need, including the basic skills of maths and English, to find and keep jobs on release or while serving a community sentence.

In addition, the Government are continuing to fund basic English and maths courses for adults who lack these skills, enabling them to gain the qualifications that they need for employment and progression.

Mr Llwyd: To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department what steps she plans to take to reduce crime amongst people who have a psychiatric disorder. [112893]

James Brokenshire: Police forces need to tackle crime in line with local priorities and from November 2012 the election of police and crime commissioners will help drive down crime by making policing more accountable and responsive to local needs and concerns. Police.uk now provides the public with street-level information about crime to enable them to hold local policing teams to account. The Government have swept away central targets and are cutting bureaucracy to help free police

26 Jun 2012 : Column 174W

officers to cut crime. At a national level, the creation of the National Crime Agency will make the UK a hostile environment for serious and organised criminality.

It is unlikely that most offenders with mental disorders offend primarily as a direct result of their disorder. It may however be a contributory factor and may also undermine an individual's ability to engage with interventions which support rehabilitation and reduce reoffending. We are committed to tackling the underlying mental health and substance misuse issues that some offenders have. Our priority is to ensure that those with mental health problems within the criminal justice system are identified as early as possible, so that the right interventions can be provided in the most appropriate setting. We are currently working with the Department of Health and Ministry of Justice to develop liaison and diversion services in police custody suites and at courts for offenders with mental health issues and other vulnerabilities, and to test options for intensive, treatment based alternatives to custody.

Mr Llwyd: To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department what steps she plans to take to reduce the number of crimes committed by people who have used drugs in the previous year. [112894]

James Brokenshire: Police forces need to tackle crime in line with local priorities and from November 2012 the election of police and crime commissioners will help drive down crime by making policing more accountable and responsive to local needs and concerns. Police.uk now provides the public with street-level information about crime to enable them to hold local policing teams to account. The Government have swept away central targets and are cutting bureaucracy to help free police officers to cut crime. At a national level, the creation of the National Crime Agency will make the UK a hostile environment for serious and organised criminality.

In relation specifically to drug misusing offenders, the Drug Interventions Programme (DIP) is a centrally funded crime reduction programme which has been running since 2003. The programme provides interventions for drug misusing offenders across England and Wales at relevant points during their contact with the criminal justice system, including police custody, court, prison, and probation.

Home Office funding for the DIP currently pays for police staff to carry out drug testing to identify drug misusing offenders among those arrested or charged, and ensure they seek support. In addition, the Home Office and Department of Health jointly provide funding to local areas for the employment of drug workers to assess and refer people into the appropriate treatment and recovery services. The programme managed nearly 63,000 individuals into treatment and recovery services in England and Wales in 2010-11, and research has shown significant reductions in offending by individuals in contact with the programme.

Crime Prevention: EU Action

Mr Raab: To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department how the European Crime Prevention Network established under EU Council Decision 2009/902/JHA interacts with the police forces of England and Wales; and what assessment her Department has made of its effectiveness. [113327]

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Nick Herbert [holding answer 25 June 2012]: It is not possible to quantify exactly the interaction by police forces in England and Wales in the activities of the European Crime Prevention Network (EUCPN) because those interactions take place primarily through police forces' uploading information to a public access website.

The UK must decide, no later than 31 May 2014, whether to accept full European Court of Justice jurisdiction over those EU police and criminal justice measures adopted before 1 December 2009 which have not been amended or replaced. This measure falls within the scope of that decision and will be reviewed accordingly.

Crime: British Overseas Territories

Fiona Mactaggart: To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department whether (a) she and (b) her officials have had discussions with UK police forces on assessing and responding to drug crime and violent crime in the overseas territories; and if she will make a statement. [112869]

Nick Herbert [holding answer 2 June 2012]: Much of the Home Office assistance to the Overseas Territories (OTs) is based on requests from them. The Home Office has not been involved in discussions with UK police forces specifically on assessing or responding to drug and violent crime in Overseas Territories (OTs) and does not commission such assistance. The Home Office has, however, authorised overseas deployments by serving police officers (under s.26 of the Police Act 1996) in response to various ad hoc requests by OTs for assistance. Annex A of The Overseas Territories and the Home Office paper

www.homeoffice.gov.uk

provides a list of examples of such support provided during 2010 and 2011. The Government will shortly publish a White Paper entitled “The Overseas Territories—Security, Success and Sustainability” and this covers UK assistance of and partnership with the OTs, including in relation to crime.

Detainees: Compensation

Chris Bryant: To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department (1) how many compensation claims for wrongful detention were (a) made and (b) granted in each year from 1997 to 2011; [113273]

(2) how many compensation claims for wrongful detention have been (a) made and (b) granted in 2012 to date; [113275]

(3) how many compensation claims for wrongful detention were (a) made and (b) granted in 2011-12. [113274]

Damian Green: In order to answer this question the UK Border Agency would need to analyse a large volume of electronic records, case and litigation files which would incur a disproportionate cost.

Energy

Caroline Flint: To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department whether her Department switched its (a) gas or (b) electricity supplier in any of the last 10 years. [113465]

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Damian Green: Since 2002 the Home Office has in the main used the central Government energy frameworks for its gas and electricity needs. The Department has switched suppliers on some occasions in moving additional buildings into these frameworks.

Caroline Flint: To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department how much her Department spent on (a) gas and (b) electricity bills in each of the last 10 years. [113497]

Damian Green: The Home Office has spent the following on gas and electricity bills in each of the last 10 years:

£ million
 Commodity
 GasElectricity

2003-04

0.58

2.84

2004-05

0.79

3.62

2005-06

1.16

4.73

2006-07

2.13

7.91

2007-08

0.86

8.11

2008-09

4.46

11.15

2009-10

3.66

11.00

2010-11

2.63

9.21

2011-12

2.38

9.65

Essex Police Authority

Mr Amess: To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department (1) what guidance Essex Police Authority issues to its employees on the booking of (a) inland and (b) overseas travel for official business; and if she will make a statement; [113097]

(2) how many and which files were sent to the National Archives by Essex Police Authority in each of the last 10 years; [113100]

(3) how many people employed by Essex Police Authority visited (a) the US and (b) the EU on official business in each of the last three years; and at what cost to the public purse in each case. [113107]

Nick Herbert: The issues raised in these questions are all matters for Essex Police Authority to address.

Mr Amess: To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department on what date each property (a) owned and (b) leased by Essex Police Authority was occupied by Essex Police Authority; and what the estimated monetary value is of each such property. [113101]

Nick Herbert: This information is not collected centrally. Decisions about the most effective use of available resources, including decisions about what property to buy or lease and the arrangements for occupying such property, are for the chief constable and police authority to take locally.

Mr Amess: To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department (1) how much it cost to run Essex Police Authority in each of the last three years; [113106]

26 Jun 2012 : Column 177W

(2) how much was spent by Essex Police Authority on the use of taxis in each of the last five years; and whether Essex Police Authority issues guidance on the use of taxis by employees; [113149]

(3) how much was spent by Essex Police Authority on entertainment in each of the last 10 years. [113150]

Nick Herbert: This information is not collected centrally. These are matters for the police authority to decide locally.

Mr Amess: To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department how many (a) males and (b) females were (i) arrested and (ii) prosecuted for an offence committed on premises occupied by Essex Police Authority in each of the last five years for which information is available; how many were (A) convicted and (B) acquitted in each case; and if she will make a statement. [113241]

Nick Herbert: The information requested is not collected centrally.

Mr Amess: To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department how much was paid in compensation by Essex Police Authority in each of the last five years for which information is available; to whom; for what reason in each case; and if she will make a statement. [113242]

Nick Herbert: This is a matter for Essex Police Authority.

Mr Amess: To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department how many people employed by Essex Police Authority were eligible for performance bonuses and special bonuses at each grade in each of the last three years; how many people received each type of bonus at each grade in each such year; what the average payment was for each type of bonus; and what the maximum payment was for each type of bonus at each grade. [113102]

Nick Herbert: This information is not collected centrally. These are matters for the Police Authority.

Mr Amess: To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department how many temporary workers were employed by Essex Police Authority in each of the last five years; and what the total cost to the public purse was of such staff in each year. [113103]

Nick Herbert: This is a matter for Essex Police Authority.

Europol

Mr Raab: To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department how many requests to (a) initiate, (b) conduct and (c) co-ordinate investigations the UK received from Europol pursuant to Article 7 of EU Council Decision 2009/371/JHA in each year since 2009; and how many of those requests resulted in an investigation. [113324]

Nick Herbert [holding answer 25 June 2012]: Records of the information requested are not held centrally.

26 Jun 2012 : Column 178W

Government Procurement Card

Rachel Reeves: To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department on which dates her Department has published Government procurement card spending over £500 since May 2010. [113364]

Damian Green: The Home Office has published Government procurement card spending over £500 on its website every month since April 2011 on the following dates:

1. April 2011 data published 30 June 2011

2. May 2011 data published 29 July 2011

3. June 2011 data published 31 August 2011

4. July 2011 data published 30 September 2011

5. August 2011 data published 31 October 2011

6. September 2011 data published 30 November 2011

7. October 2011 data published 30 December 2011

8. November 2011 data published 31 January 2012

9. December 2011 data published 29 February 2012

10. January 2012 data published 30 March 2012

11. February 2012 data published 30 April 2012

Immigration

Mr Spellar: To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department what assessment her Department has made of the abuse by citizens of non-EU member states of the right of entry into the UK for citizens from accession states. [113548]

Damian Green: In 2011 Border Force officers detected 433 non-EU citizens who attempted to gain entry to the UK by falsely presenting themselves as a national of an Accession state with a right of entry. In these cases the non-EU citizen presented a forged document or impersonated the holder of a genuine document issued by an Accession state.

There is also evidence to suggest that the free movement rights of Accession state nationals are being abused through marriages of conveniences. In 2011 the UK Border Agency received 579 reports from registrars of suspected marriages of convenience involving Accession nationals marrying third country nationals.

The Government are committed to protecting free movement rights from fraud and abuse and is taking action domestically and at the EU-level to tackle the problem.

Immigration Controls

Sir Bob Russell: To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department what training staff operating passport and security desks at sea and airports undertake on customer-friendly attitudes; whether performance in this area is monitored; and whether refresher training sessions are undertaken. [113642]

Damian Green: Border Force constantly strives to provide a high standard of customer service at the border. Officers within Border Force is provided with a range of customer service training including

Exceeding Customer Expectations—Aimed at all officers; covers ways to improve the quality of the customer service provided;

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Proud to Serve and Protect—Professional Service—Aimed at all officers; raises awareness of how the behaviour of an officer working at the border can impact on the customer experience;

Proud to Serve and Protect—BF Service Style—Aimed at all officers; covers the standard for face to face interaction with our public;

Sustaining Excellent Customer Service—Aimed at managers; provides tools to reinforce and recognise good customer service plus address problem situations;

First Impressions Count—Aimed at all officers; places emphasis on the important role officers' will play in the overall Olympic and Paralympic experience, with particular focus on the Paralympics.

Monitoring of performance, including observing the manner in which individual officers deal with the public, is the responsibility of team leaders.

Refresher training on customer service is being provided by the provision to all officers of the First Impressions Count package.

Immigration: Merseyside

Mr Woodward: To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department how many applications from people of non-European Economic Area nationality applying for leave to enter the UK on the basis of their family relationship with a British citizen or a person settled in the UK were sponsored by someone living in St Helens South and Whiston constituency in each of the last five years. [113411]

Damian Green: The following table provides the number of entry clearance applications from non-EU nationals applying for leave to enter on the basis of their family relationship with a British citizen or a person settled in the UK, and where the sponsor of these applications is someone living in the St Helens South and Whiston constituency in the last five years.

 Applications

2007

206

2008

209

2009

165

2010

155

2011

151

Total

886

The above data are based on management information. It is provisional and subject to change. The data relate to applications where the sponsor postcode begins with WA10 or L35.

Information Officers

Rachel Reeves: To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department how much press officers in her Department, its agencies and arm’s length bodies claimed in reimbursable expenses since May 2010. [112990]

Damian Green [holding answer 21 June 2012]: A total value of £54,037.32 was claimed and paid in reimbursable expenses between May 2010 and 19 June 2012.

Abu Qatada

Mr Mike Hancock: To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department how much her Department has spent on legal fees for (a) Abu Qatada and (b) her Department since 2002. [113429]

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Damian Green: Legal fees incurred by the Government to deport Abu Qatada are £0.82 million up to 30 April 2012. The case is ongoing, and so further costs are likely to be incurred.

Home Office spend on legal fees over the last 10 years is as follows:

Legal fees
 £ million

2003-04

12.27

2004-05

15.11

2005-06

21.11

2006-07

27.20

2007-08

29.26

2008-09

28.95

2009-10

29.76

2010-11

44.18

2011-12

50.54

Licensing Laws: Birmingham

Shabana Mahmood: To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department what information her Department holds on the number of alcohol licences revoked in (a) Birmingham, Ladywood constituency and (b) Birmingham city council area since the coming into force of the Licensing Act 2003. [113056]

James Brokenshire: Alcohol licensing statistics are not collected by constituency, so they cannot be broken down to the requested level. The latest available information relates to the number of premises licences, club premises certificates and personal licences surrendered, lapsed, revoked, forfeited, suspended or withdrawn within Birmingham licensing authority as a whole between 1 April 2006 and 31 March 2010.

These figures can be seen within the following tables. They include all such authorisations for licensable activities under the Licensing Act 2003 covering the licensing authority.

Table 1: Premises licences surrendered, lapsed, suspended by a court, closure notice, Birmingham licensing authority, 2006-07 to 2009-10
Financial yearSurrendered(1)Lapsed(2)Suspended by a court(3)Closure notice(4)

2006-07

30

6

0

(5)

2007-08

7

5

0

0

2008-09

204

35

0

0

2009-10

13

12

0

0

(1) Where a premises licence is surrendered under section 28 of the Licensing Act 2003. (2) Where a premises licence has lapsed due to the death, incapacity, insolvency etc. of the licence holder, as set out under section 27 of the Licensing Act 2003. Excludes instances where a premises licence was in effect for a limited period, but the period has since expired (e.g. one-off events). (3) Where a premises licence is suspended by a court, under section 147B( 1) of the Licensing Act 2003 (as amended by the Violent Crime Reduction Act 2006) for the sale or supply of alcohol, following an offence of persistently selling to underage children. (4) Where a premises is prohibited from selling alcohol for 48 hours following a closure notice under s.169A. (5) Unknown (not collected in 2006-07).
Table 2: Club premises certificates surrendered, lapsed, withdrawn, Birmingham licensing authority, 2006-07 to 2009-10
Financial yearSurrendered(1)Lapsed(2)Withdrawn(3)

2006-07(2)

0

0

0

2007-08

1

0

0

2008-09

11

0

0

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2009-10

9

0

0

(1) Where a club premises certificate is surrendered under section 81(3) of the Licensing Act 2003. (2) Where a club premises certificate has lapsed because it had effect for a limited period, but that period has since expired. (3) Where a club premises certificate is withdrawn under section 90 of the Licensing Act 2003.
Table 3: Personal licences surrendered, revoked, forfeited, suspended by a court, Birmingham Licensing Authority, 2006-07 to 2009-10
Financial yearSurrendered(1)Revoked(2)Forfeited(3)Suspended by a court(4)

2006-07

2

0

0

0

2007-08

5

0

0

0

2008-09

13

0

1

0

2009-10

4

0

1

0

(1) Where a personal licence is surrendered under section 116 of the Licensing Act 2003. (2) Where a personal licence is revoked under section 124 of the Licensing Act 2003. (3) Where a personal licence has been forfeited following a court order under section 129 of the Licensing Act 2003 in the time period specified (and where that order has not been suspended, pending an appeal under sections 129(4) or 130 of the Licensing Act 2003). (4) Where a personal licence is suspended following a court order under section 129 of the Licensing Act 2003 in the time period specified (and where that order has not been suspended, pending an appeal under sections 129(4) or 130 of the Licensing Act 2003).

Olympic Games 2012

Chris Bryant: To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department what assessment she has made of the effect secondments to the UK Border Force during the London 2012 Olympics will have on the detection of illegal drugs at ports. [113276]

Damian Green: The secondments to Border Force during the London 2012 Olympic period will help it to maintain all border security activity, including the detection of illegal drugs at ports.

Chris Bryant: To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department whether foreign law enforcement agents and other foreign nationals with firearms will be allowed to enter the UK during the London 2012 Olympics; and what steps she plans to take to ensure such firearms are tracked. [113277]

Damian Green: Foreign law enforcement agents (known as in flight security officers or federal air marshals or sky marshals) are not permitted to hold firearms in the United Kingdom. Border Force will continue to secure and retain control of firearms being brought to the UK by foreign law enforcement agents.

The Government remain committed to delivering a safe and secure Olympic games in 2012, and lead responsibility for this rests with the police who have substantial experience of dealing with public order and security at major events. The rules governing the presence of foreign security and protection teams at the games are the same as at any time.

Foreign national games family members (GFM) competing in the Olympic and Paralympic shooting events will be given the appropriate authority to hold firearms. All firearms will be held in the Royal Artillery Barracks in the UK. The London Organising

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Committee of the Olympic and Paralympic Games (LOCOG) will be operating a collection-and-return service between the ports and the Royal Artillery Barracks for firearms. Border Force officers, along with the Metropolitan Police Service, SO19—specialist firearms command responsible for issuing British visitors firearms permits—will be deployed to the Royal Artillery Barracks to ensure that regulatory requirements and re-export of firearms are completed.

Organised Crime: British Overseas Territories

Fiona Mactaggart: To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department what assessment she has made of the presence of organised crime in each of the overseas territories; and if she will make a statement. [112866]

Nick Herbert [holding answer 25 June 2012]: The Overseas Territories and the Home Office paper

www.homeoffice.gov.uk

provides an overview of some of the assistance provided by the Home Office to the Overseas Territories (OTs). A number of Government agencies, including the Serious Organised Crime Agency (SOCA), are well positioned to liaise with and support each OT to protect itself from the threat of organised crime. In delivering Local to Global, the Government's organised crime strategy, SOCA liaises regularly with the Caribbean OTs and supports them with training, equipment and staffing resources to combat a broad spectrum of serious and organised crime impacting upon the region and potentially the UK.

The Government will also shortly publish a White Paper entitled “The Overseas Territories—Security, Success and Sustainability” which covers UK assistance of, and partnership with, the OTs, including in relation to crime.

Police

Dan Jarvis: To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department how many police officers have been recruited in the (a) South Yorkshire, (b) Northumberland, (c) Merseyside and (d) Metropolitan police since May 2010. [113297]

Nick Herbert [holding answer 25 June 2012]: The number of police officers that have been recruited in the South Yorkshire, Northumbria, Merseyside and Metropolitan police for 2010-11 are shown within the following table:

Police officer joiners for South Yorkshire, Northumbria, Merseyside and Metropolitan police for 2010-11(1,2)
 Joiners

South Yorkshire

102

Northumbria

54

Merseyside

2

Metropolitan police

432

1 This table contain full-time equivalent figures that have been rounded to the nearest whole number. (2) Figures include transfers from other England and Wales forces but does not include officers returning after a period of secondment.

26 Jun 2012 : Column 183W

Police: Information and Communications Technology

Mr Hanson: To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department (1) which police authorities had agreed to participate in the new police ICT company as at 18 June 2012; [113383]

(2) by what date she expects the new police ICT company to be established. [113384]

Nick Herbert: We plan to update Parliament on the creation of the company shortly.

Police: Overtime

Mr Burley: To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department how much each police force spent on overtime for (a) police officers, (b) police community support officers and (c) police staff in each of the last 10 financial years. [113224]

Nick Herbert [holding answer 25 June 2012]: The data are available on the website of the Chartered Institute of Public Finance Accountants at:

www.cipfastats.net

Police: Pay

Dan Jarvis: To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department what assessment she has made of the effects of the freeze of incremental pay of police officers with over three years of service. [113077]

Nick Herbert [holding answer 21 June 2012]: A two-year freeze of incremental progression was among the recommendations made by the Police Arbitration Tribunal (PAT) in January. My right hon. Friend the Secretary of State for the Home Department considered the tribunal's findings very carefully, in line with her statutory responsibilities. She announced on 30 January that she had decided to accept the PAT's recommendation. I refer the hon. Member to her statement of 30 January 2012, Official Report, column 31WS.

Prisoners: Repatriation

Nadine Dorries: To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department (1) what steps her Department is taking to increase the number of countries to which foreign national offenders can be removed; [113533]

(2) with reference to section 21 of the Coalition agreement, to how many more countries the UK can now deport foreign criminals than in 2010. [113686]

Damian Green: There are no countries to which, as a matter of immigration policy, the UK Border Agency cannot remove foreign national offenders. However, there may be some countries where it is difficult to make enforced removals, or where there are legal barriers that prevent removal from taking place.

The UK Border Agency continues to work in partnership with the officials of foreign Governments to overcome any barriers faced in enforced removals.

26 Jun 2012 : Column 184W

Procurement

Jeremy Lefroy: To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department how many contracts issued by her Department were awarded to small and medium-sized enterprises in 2011-12; what proportion that figure represents of all contracts let; and what the monetary value was of such contracts. [113962]

Damian Green: I refer my hon. Friend to the answer I gave on 19 June 2012, Official Report, column 877W.

UK Border Force

Chris Bryant: To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department what her policy is on the establishment of a national command centre by the UK Border Force. [113278]

Damian Green: There are no plans to establish a Border Force national command and control centre. Border Force currently ensures that appropriate arrangements for managing deployment and incidents are in place, and the efficacy of such arrangements is kept under review.

Young Offenders: Reoffenders

Kate Green: To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department how many arrests at the prison gate there were of people just released from prison aged 25 years and under in each of the last five years. [113046]

Nick Herbert: The information requested is not available centrally.

Education

Adoption: Ethnic Groups

Keith Vaz: To ask the Secretary of State for Education pursuant to the answer of 11 June 2012, Official Report, column 364W, on adoption: ethnic groups, for what reason his Department does not collect information on the ethnicity of adopters. [112708]

Tim Loughton: All children who ceased to be looked after at some point during the year, on the granting of an adoption order, will have been placed with their adoptive parents before the making of the adoption order. The Department collects information from local authorities on the number of adopters, their gender and relationship status. The collection of data on adopters was intended to monitor the implementation of the Adoption and Children Act 2002 and was limited to avoid a large data burden upon local authorities and the data collection process. However, Ofsted is now collecting information on the ethnicity of adopters under their annual adoption collection, and therefore in future this information will be available to the Department.

Young People: Carers

Julian Sturdy: To ask the Secretary of State for Education what support his Department has made available to young carers since 2010. [112745]

Tim Loughton: Supporting carers, including young carers, is a priority for this Government. We want young carers to be healthy, to achieve and to have the same opportunities as other children.

26 Jun 2012 : Column 185W

That is why within six months of the general election we published the revised HMG Carers Strategy ‘Recognised, valued and supported: Next Steps for the Carers Strategy’. The Department made three commitments in that strategy, all of which have now been implemented: to make a new Early Intervention Grant available to local Government; to work with the Department for Business, Innovation and Skills to develop the first all-age careers service; and to launch a new national campaign to help turn around the lives of families with multiple problems—now being lead by the troubled families team in the Department for Communities and Local Government.

In addition to this work the Department for Education is also grant-funding the Children's Society and Carers Trust £1.5 million over two years to work with local authorities and voluntary and community organisations to: encourage children's and adult services to work more closely together and adopt ‘whole family’ approaches to supporting young carers; and identify and share existing evidence based good practice, tools and resources for the identification and support of young carers.

To support this work further the Department for Education (DFE) has also worked with the Department of Health and the National Young Carers Coalition to create a ‘Healthy Schools’ e-learning module for teachers and school staff to enable them to better identify and support young carers. It is available on the Children's Society website:

http://www.childrenssociety.org.uk/sites/default/files/Young-Carers-Web-Pub-v13/player.html

To support the spread of effective practice, we have also published ‘Turning around the lives of families with multiple problems—an evaluation of the Family and Young Carer Pathfinders Programme’. This evaluation report is based on findings from 18 local authorities that have been developing innovative local practice by getting children's and adult services to work effectively together alongside the voluntary sector and schools to support young carers. The report is available at:

https://www.education.gov.uk/publications/RSG/publicationDetail/Page1/DFE-RR154

Last year following Carers Week I wrote to every MP and every director of children's services in England to urge them to continue to champion the cause of young carers in their area and ensure they have access to the support services they require.

Young People: North East

Alex Cunningham: To ask the Secretary of State for Education what comparative assessment he has made of the proportion of young people in the north-east and other regions who are not in education, employment and training. [113109]

Tim Loughton: Official estimates of the number and proportion of 16-18 year olds not in education, employment or training (NEET) in England are published by the Department in a statistical first release (SFR) each June and can be found on the Department's website:

http://www.education.gov.uk/rsgateway/DB/SFR/s001011/index.shtml

However, these estimates cannot be broken down to regional level.

26 Jun 2012 : Column 186W

We can estimate the number and proportion of 16-18 year olds NEET at a regional level using data collected by local authorities. The proportion of 16-18 year olds who were NEET in each region in England at the end of 2011 (November 2011-January 2012 average) is shown in the following table. Note that due to methodological differences, estimates for young people NEET based on local authority data tend to be lower than the official estimates for NEET in the SFR.

Proportion of 16-18 year olds NEET by region
 Percentage

North East

8.8

North West

7.1

Yorkshire and Humber

7.1

East Midlands

5.4

West Midlands

6.2

South West

5.7

East of England

6.0

London

4.5

South East

5.8

England

6.1

Source: Local authority data (CCIS)

Alex Cunningham: To ask the Secretary of State for Education how much funding is available through the Youth Contract specifically to help young people not in education, employment or training in the north-east; and if he will make a statement. [113110]

Tim Loughton: As part of the Youth Contract, we will provide additional support for 16 to 17-year-olds who are not in education, employment or training and have low levels of qualifications. We expect provision to be available to young people from September and have confirmed funding until the end of 2014-15.

For the north-east region, excluding Newcastle and Gateshead local authorities, we have set an indicative contract amount of £6,494,447 over that period. We also intend to devolve £577,695 directly to Newcastle and Gateshead local authorities in each of the next three years to allow them to procure tailored local support for young people as part of our City Deals.